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Foundation Used To Only Have Three Colors, Here’s How We Went From Nudes To Fenty

Ah, foundation. Literally the basic building block for most of our beauty routines. It’s been around literally since the early ages and continues to thrive and impact the ways in which beauty brands develop their own platforms. But foundation wasn’t always as inclusive and complex as it used to be While it’s not uncommon to find foundation in it is starkest  blanket shades, literally dubbed light, medium, and dark, beauty brands like Fenty, Estée Lauder and Maybelline New York have all pushed for foundation hues that complement the broad spectrum of skin tones. But how did we make such progress in beauty? And where did foundation originally come from? 

Here’s a brief and insightful look at how foundation became another household item that we cannot live without.

In the beginning, foundation was only for the rich and powerful.

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Believe it or not, makeup goes back all the way to Biblical days where it was referred to as “face painting.” Just check out the Old Testament (Ezekiel 23:40). It was also used by rich Romans and Greeks during 200 B.C. However, the practice of using makeup for spectacle purpose could be seen more prominently in the 17th-century by monarchs such as Queen Elizabeth I and in the 18th-century men began to wear it too as made fashionable by Louis XV. Back then, this group of elites would wear foundation while artists painted their portraits as part of s social affairs, and actors would then go onto wear their looks onstage. While the foundation was only worn by the wealthy, the makeup itself was made out of toxic ingredients including zinc oxide, glycerin and calamine lotion.

Foundation, as we know it today, has its roots in Germany and Poland.

Credit: Instagram/@oldhollywoodmoviemagic

Originally, German actor Carl Baudin created greasepaint to use as a tool to use on stage so his wig line would be hidden onstage. The greasepaint was made out of zinc white, ochre, and vermillion in lard. Weird, right? But it worked and he began to sell it. Then in 1914, Polish makeup icon Max Factor created his own formula that was a mix of pigment and lard and invented. Factor created the makeup specifically for actors in Hollywood and it worked so well on film that the product became a hot commodity. The Hollywood industry only used Max Factor foundations on sets. The term people used for the foundation was called pan-cake because of the density of the product but also it wasn’t only in liquid form but packed powder. 

The evolution of foundation in the ’70s, ’80s, and ’90s

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For the most part, foundation just came in three shades, white, medium, and dark, which didn’t leave much room for those of us with a skin tone that didn’t fall into any of those three tones. While cosmetic companies began to manufacture their own foundation, for the average woman the main brands were Maybelline and Cover Girl. Both those brands sold compact powder cases that provided inexpensive coverage that provided coverage for faces. 

Loose powder foundation. Finally a breakthrough!

 Credit: Instagram/@bareminerals

As foundation continues to evolve, we now have foundation that comes in all forms including loose powder. While liquid provides extensive coverage that basically gets applied just like paint, for women who want a natural look can easily turn to loose powder for that flawless look. In the late ’90s Leslie Blodgett, a makeup executive at Bare Escentuals, changed the foundation game when her company created Bare Minerals, released a loose powder foundation that had SPF and other vital minerals for your face. Now every cosmetic company sells their own version of loose foundation powder. 

Foundation for everyone.

Credit: Instagram/@boise.beauty

Foundation has come a long way. It’s not the pan-cake makeup of yesteryear, nor is it made just for the rich and famous. It comes in a variety forms, including liquid, matte, powder, sticks, and so much more. The great thing about this evolving makeup is that it comes in all tones and for all skin types, and it’s no longer made with harmful ingredients. Today, cosmetic companies have found ways to create a product that not only provides coverage but that can also help your skin. There’s a huge portion of the beauty industry that sells products that are vegan, animal-cruelty free and made of organic ingredients. Imagine if Max Factor knew how foundation was made today, he’d probably think you were joking and argue that foundation could not be made without the use of animal lard. The reality is that today trying to choosing which foundation might have become a bit more complex since he started making foundation but as a result, mostly everyone is able to find a brand that works for their skin tone,  beauty standards, and wallet. 

READ: 25 Brands Made For Latinas And Women Of Color That Are Totally Crushing The Beauty Game

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Mexico City Could Soon Change Its Name To Better Embrace Its Indigenous Identity

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Mexico City Could Soon Change Its Name To Better Embrace Its Indigenous Identity

Mexico City is the oldest surviving capital city in all of the Americas. It also is one of only two that actually served as capitals of their Indigenous communities – the other being Quito, Ecuador. But much of that incredible history is washed over in history books, tourism advertisements, and the everyday hustle and bustle of a city of 21 million people.

Recently, city residents voted on a non-binding resolution that could see the city’s name changed back to it’s pre-Hispanic origin to help shine a light on its rich Indigenous history.

Mexico City could soon be renamed in honor of its pre-Hispanic identity.

A recent poll shows that 54% of chilangos (as residents of Mexico City are called) are in favor of changing the city’s official name from Ciudad de México to México-Tenochtitlán. In contrast, 42% of respondents said they didn’t support a name change while 4% said they they didn’t know.

Conducted earlier this month as Mexico City gears up to mark the 500th anniversary of the fall of the Aztec empire capital with a series of cultural events, the poll also asked respondents if they identified more as Mexicas, as Aztec people were also known, Spanish or mestizo (mixed indigenous and Spanish blood).

Mestizo was the most popular response, with 55% of respondents saying they identified as such while 37% saw themselves more as Mexicas. Only 4% identified as Spaniards and the same percentage said they didn’t know with whom they identified most.

The poll also touched on the city’s history.

The ancient city of Tenochtitlán.

The same poll also asked people if they thought that the 500th anniversary of the Spanish conquest of Tenochtitlán by Spanish conquistadoresshould be commemorated or forgotten, 80% chose the former option while just 16% opted for the latter.

Three-quarters of respondents said they preferred areas of the the capital where colonial-era architecture predominates, such as the historic center, while 24% said that they favored zones with modern architecture.

There are also numerous examples of pre-Hispanic architecture in Mexico City including the Templo Mayor, Tlatelolco and Cuicuilco archaeological sites.

Tenochtitlán was one of the world’s most advanced cities when the Spanish arrived.

Tenochtitlán, which means “place where prickly pears abound” in Náhuatl, was founded by the Mexica people in 1325 on an island located on Lake Texcoco. The legend goes that they decided to build a city on the island because they saw the omen they were seeking: an eagle devouring a snake while perched on a nopal.

At its peak, it was the largest city in the pre-Columbian Americas. It subsequently became a cabecera of the Viceroyalty of New Spain. Today, the ruins of Tenochtitlán are in the historic center of the Mexican capital. The World Heritage Site of Xochimilco contains what remains of the geography (water, boats, floating gardens) of the Mexica capital.

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Madonna’s Daughter Lourdes Embraces Natural Body Hair In Beautiful Selfie With Mom

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Madonna’s Daughter Lourdes Embraces Natural Body Hair In Beautiful Selfie With Mom

Grooming habits should be a matter of personal choice, but thanks to generations of the patriarchy telling women how they should look, what they should wear, and how they should take care of their bodies, that isn’t always the case. Thankfully, more and more brave women are embracing their natural beauty and that includes their own body hair.

Lourdes Leon showing off her natural arm pit hair is the normalization of body hair we all need.

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A post shared by Madonna (@madonna)

Whether it’s on the red carpet or in a photo with her mom, Madonna, Lourdes Leon has a relationship with her body hair we can all admire. For instance, he two posed for a rare selfie on April 10, and Leon’s natural look moved us another step closer to normalizing visible body hair.

The sweet image is captioned: “Like Pieces of your Heart Walking around outside of you #lola.”

‘Lola’ is the nickname of Madonna’s eldest child, whom she shares with Cuban personal trainer-actor Carlos Leon.

The fashion icon’s post has received more than 440,000 ‘likes’ with many fans praising her daughter’s decision to embrace her natural body hair – with comments including “two beautiful, strong women” and “beautiful mother with her gorgeous daughter.”

Leon has never been shy about embracing her natural beauty.

Her mother has pushed beauty boundaries for decades, so it makes sense the 24-year-old model would choose to do the same. In November 2018, Lourdes generated headlines when she showed off her unshaved armpits and legs on the red carpet at the CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund Gala, just weeks after she turned heads for the same reason on the catwalk at New York Fashion Week.

Earlier this year, in February, she also showed off a glimpse of armpit hair in a new fashion campaign for Marc Jacobs. 

It seems that Lourdes may even have been inspired by her famous mom when it comes to ditching the razor. Speaking to Harper’s Bazaar in 2010, the singer said: “Going to high school, I saw how popular girls had to behave to get the boys. I knew I couldn’t fit into that.

“So I decided to do the opposite. I refused to wear makeup, to have a hairstyle. I refused to shave. I had hairy armpits.”

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