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22 WOC Body Positive Brands

The body positivity movement has seen a real shift in the way that we think about beauty standards, and also pop culture. While the content we consume influences the way that we perceive beauty and our bodies, we can also exercise the power to change our culture that privileges thin, white, able bodies. And so, we’ve put together a list of WOC body positive brands – from bigger companies, to authors, models, right down to individual influencers – to ensure that we can participate in a culture that shows beauty in all its wonderful and gorgeous diversity.

1. Plus Model Magazine

Instagram / @plusmodelmag

Plus Model Magazine is curated with content for, surprise-surprise, plus-sized women. Led by editor-in-chief Madeline Figueroa-Jones, this publication strives to show its audience not only stylish options for dressing but also body confidence in action.

2. The Chenese Lewis Show

Instagram / @cheneselewis

The most powerful part of the Chenese Lewis Show is that it is a podcast made for plus-sized women, by a plus-sized WOC. The show features interviews with women and asks for commentary from plus-sized influencers, in addition to industry experts.

3. Jibri

Instagram / @jibrionline

Plus-sized women’s clothing brand Jibri was founded by American fashion designer, Jasmine Elder. Inspired by her teenage mentor, Jibri Mann, Elder created her classy fashion brand and has since had her work featured in the likes of Marie Claire, Cosmopolitan and also InStyle Magazine.

4. Daily Venus Diva

Instagram / @dailyvenusdiva

This online publication, headed up by creator Steph D. Penn, highlights plus-sized fashion and pop culture, driving content that ties beauty and body positivity.

5. Moonlight Serenade Apparel

Instagram / @moonlightserenadeapparel

Moonlight Serenade Apparel boasts a gorgeous array of lingerie, reminding plus-sized ladies to embrace their sexy side, too!

6. Maiysha

Instagram / @maiyshakai

Maiysha is a force to be reckoned with. As the managing editor of The Glow Up at The Root, iconic plus-sized model, and Grammy-nominated artist, she’s one to watch as a one-woman show-cum-role-model.

7. Nikki Gomez

Instagram / @thenikkigomez

These days, Nikki Gomez foregrounds beautiful big black bodies in her work as a photographer, balancing her photographic work alongside her love for blogging about food and fashion on her website, The Nikki Gomez.

8. Christina Mendez

Instagram / @modelchristinamendez

This lifestyle blogger professionally models plus-sized clothing on both her Instagram and website, spending her time promoting body positivity online and in the community.

9. A Curious Fancy

Instagram / @polka.cafe

Fashion blogger Ragini Nag Rao started blogging a decade ago, in 2009. As a veteran in the online community, she’s been working hard to normalize fat fashion by showing off her classy vintage outfits and looks.

10. Chronicles of a Mixed Fat Chick

Instagram / @mixedfatchick

Founder Pia Schiavo-Campo uses her platform as a blogger, public speaker, life coach and style expert to foreground #fatfab40s. Body positivity isn’t just about size or skin – it’s also about embracing age, too!

11. Full Figured Fashion Week

Instagram / @moguldiva

Full Figured Fashion Week, or FFFWeek, was a 20-year project in the making from the likes of visionary and entrepreneur Gwen DeVoe. While FFFWeek isn’t running in 2019, we can expect to see it return in 2020, after DeVoe has dedicated her time towards hosting smaller events revolving around plus-sized fashion and body positivity.

12. Monif C

Instagram / @monifcplussizes

With 14 years of business behind it, Monif C is a small business that produces lingerie, primarily catering for bigger women. For those of you who are interested, you can find its delicious selection of racy underwear on Etsy.

13. Model Behavior with Sharon Quinn

Instagram / @modelbehaviortvwithsharonquinn

Having spent many years on the modeling circuit as a plus-sized WOC, Sharon Quinn used her platform to create an award-winning talk show series that focused on both fashion and the entertainment business.

14. Premme

Instagram / @premme.us

Co-founded by the real “OG fat girl” model, Gabi Gregg, Premme is a clothing brand designed with bigger bodies in mind. Part of the joy of signing up to their mailing list is getting a sweet 10 percent off your next purchase – jump on it now, babes!

15. I Weigh

Instagram / @i_weigh

I Weigh, an online community founded by The Good Place actress Jameela Jamil, was created after Jamil realized that, as a successful actress, she had a platform she could use to promote body positivity and diversity. The intention behind the movement’s name was to show that we are all worth more than how much we weigh. I Weigh shows love for anything from tiger-stripe like stretch marks to beautiful disabled bodies and gorgeous curvaceous women.

16. The Body is Not an Apology

Instagram / @thebodyisnotanapology

This online course and community, initiated by activist and performance poet Sonya Renee Taylor, is geared towards teaching people how to love themselves, in all their imperfect glory.

17. The Shopping Slayer

Instagram / @theshoppingslayer

Created by author, mom and self-confessed lipstick-lover, Lisa Scott, The Shopping Slayer celebrates fashion from the perspective of a WOC plus-sized model. Rather than hiding her body, she adorns it in eye-catching patterns and bold color.

18. Su-Style

Instagram / @sustyletv

Su-Style has been a hit within the Latina community, as founder Suzanna Ujaque found her niche as a Latina fashion blogger and Plus-Sized expert. She creates content on both her Instagram page and Youtube channel promoting body positivity and diversity, which supports her own lifestyle blogging activities.

19. Virgie Tovar

Instagram / @virgietovar

This author of You Have the Right to Remain Fat advocates for the “right to bare arms” and embraces all of the rolls and wrinkles that come with living on the larger side of life. Beyond her advocacy for body positivity in her books, Tovar de-stigmatizes the plus-sized community by sharing her day-to-day life, spending time with friends, eating what she likes, and generally being all smiles, all of the time.

20. Plus Size Biz

Instagram / @nationalcurvesday

Founded by Jennene Biggins, Plus Size Biz is centered around making body positive brands easier to find in the US. Functioning as a search engine of sorts, the site features both location and business categories to make finding a business that caters for plus-sized people a straightforward process.

21. The Curvy Fashionista

Instagram / @thecurvyfashionista

The Curvy Fashionista is an online publication that knows its audience: WOC who want to see themselves represented in the media that they consume. Having operated since 2008, the magazine continues to feature stories centered on the body positivity and resources for plus-sized women.

22. Susan Moses

Instagram / @madameandmademoiselle

Susan Moses is undeniably a trailblazer, with her styling talent featured on the red carpet at events such as the Oscar’s, Golden Globes, Grammies and American Music Awards. Considering her illustrious career working with gorgeous and talented women – yes, she can name-drop that she’s Queen Latifah – Moses wrote The Art of Dressing Curves to celebrate and empower curvy women.

The body positive movement has given us much to celebrate, from thinking about the way that we relate to our own bodies, to how we think about other people’s bodies, too. What’s your experiences with the body positive movement – and have you already had the chance to interact with WOC body positive brands? Tell us about it on Twitter – you can find it by clicking on the logo at the top of the page.

As El Chapo Got Sentenced To Life In Prison, His Daughter Launched A Clothing Line Based Off The Drug Lord And People Cannot Wait To Drop Money On This

Entertainment

As El Chapo Got Sentenced To Life In Prison, His Daughter Launched A Clothing Line Based Off The Drug Lord And People Cannot Wait To Drop Money On This

El Chapo Guzmán / Facebook

It’s been a tumultuous week for drug lord Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman. On Wednesday, Guzman was sentenced to life in prison plus 30 years and was ordered to pay $12.6 billion in forfeiture. But on that same day, Alejandrina Gisselle Guzman Salazar, one of Guzman’s ten children, was in the midst of officially launching her new clothing line named after her father, El Chapo 701.

El Chapo’s daughter is starting a clothing line in Mexico that is based heavily off the legacy and lore surrounding him.

Credit: Twitter/@afpmexico

The brand-new fashion line made it’s debut at the Intermoda fashion show in Guadalajara this week and is making headlines for its inspiration. Alejandrina Guzman named the brand “El Chapo 701” as a reference to Forbes naming her father the 701st richest person in the world back in 2009. 

The clothing line sells items such as T-shirts, belts, purses, and jackets all adorned with imagery of Guzman and the 701 logo. According to the Mexico Daily News, many of the products that were on display in Guadalajara were made by prison inmates at the Puente Grande prison in Jalisco where Guzman managed to escape from in 2001 out of a laundry cart. The proceeds from sales will reportedly go to helping people in need and assist in the reintegration of inmates back into society.

“In the entire world, he is known as the CEO of Sinaloa or the Lord of the Mountains. He is the unique and legendary 701,” the brands website says.

Products prices range from $35 for shirts to $100 for belts and jackets. 

Credit: Twitter/@1_am-damson

Whether it’s ties, leather wallets, and boots, El Chapo 701 has managed to produce a wide variety of items for the El Chapo enthusiast in your family. Many of the items reportedly sold out very quickly at the Intermoda fashion show amidst growing buzz for the recently incarcerated Guzman. 

But there is already a competing El Chapo brand that is being released. That company has the consent and approval of Guzman and is being headed by his wife. 

Back in March, Guzman had reportedly signed a contract from prison granting rights for his name and likenesses to a company headed by his wife, Emma Coronel. The company is called El Chapo Guzman and just saw it’s first clothing drop last week. The ex-drug lord will not have any role or say in Coronel’s company. 

“I’m very excited to start this project, which was based on ideas and concepts that my husband and I had years ago,” Coronel told CNN, adding that the line will be dedicated to their twin daughters.

Reaction to the El Chapo clothing brand has been quite interesting online as some are praising his daughter for her entrepreneurship skills.

Credit: Twitter/@genesis_araiza

Some people online are looking at the brand launch in a more positive way. One user said “You gotta understand Our people are hustlers. The hustle never stops! YEEE!!! Plus it’s simply supply and demand WHY U MAD HE CAUGHT ALREADY”

Guzman has been viewed differently by various people since his rise to Robin Hood-like reputation in Mexico. He would often give back to the many poor communities in Sinaloa, Mexico making him a beloved figure to many there. But that legacy is mixed to others as Guzman became a drug lord and kingpin for drug cartels in the ’80s and ’90s. 

While the 62-year-old Guzman gets ready to spend the rest of his life behind bars, there is a growing market for brand and name. With nearly 9K followers on Instagram, Alejandrina Guzman has a well-established social media presence for her fashion brand and will no doubt be fueling this popularity behind El Chapo. 

“There are people who give us a lot of support, who like it, who buy things and come from other places to distribute our products,” Adriana Ituarte, a sales representative for the brand told Mexico News Daily. “But there are some people who criticize us, who say we are promoting a drug trafficker.”

READ: El Chapo Will Spend The Rest Of His Life Behind Bars But It’s What He Told The Judge That Everyone Is Talking About

Just When You Thought The Fashion Industry Didn’t Need To Learn More Lessons About Tone Deafness, Chanel Did This

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Just When You Thought The Fashion Industry Didn’t Need To Learn More Lessons About Tone Deafness, Chanel Did This

@chanelofficial / Instagram

Like many major institutions, the Fashion Industry has been accused in the past of gatekeeping and breeding a lack of diversity in its designers, models, and photographers. This lack of variety in the stories told by the industry has resulted in more than a few controversies in the recent past for some of the biggest names in fashion.

Brands like Gucci, Prada, and H&M have all seen major backlash after featuring products that were more than a little racist. Back in December of 2018, it was Prada with their Golliwog-like figures displayed in the windows of their SoHo boutique. Then there was H&M and their online page featuring a young, black child wearing a shirt that had the word monkey on it. Less than a month later it was Gucci in February 2019, with their sweater that — when pulled up — had the dark features and red lips of a blackface character.

These controversies caused more than a little public outcry when they happened. Either because of these instances or because they realized it was way past time, all three of these company’s created some sort of position to encourage diversity and inclusion in their organizations.

Now, it seems that Chanel has done the same but their hire has a major difference than others in the industry.

Twitter / @BoF

Earlier this month, Fiona Pargeter — who previously held the same position at Swiss bank UBS — joined Chanel as their Head of Diversity and Inclusion. Though Pargeter obviously comes with previous experience, she also lacks something that seems important in an inclusion director. Namely, she isn’t a member of one of the marginalized communities Chanel hopes to further incorporate.

According to a post on VOGUE, the role was created as “a sign of Chanel’s commitment and its importance to the house.” In an interview with THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER, a Chanel representative elaborated on this new position. The statement read:

“Fiona Pargeter just joined the company in the position of head of Diversity and Inclusion to evolve our existing diversity and inclusion approach. Diversity and Inclusion has been led for a couple of years in our People and Organization function by our people communication and engagement leader. Fiona has been hired to continue to create momentum for our efforts. This recruitment is a sign of our commitment to these topics and its importance to the house.”

While the position doesn’t necessarily require the director of diversity and inclusion to be a minority, this appointment does raise some valid questions.

Twitter / @Brigitte_Vezina

Was Pargeter the best person for the job based on her experience and skill and is that why she got the job or was it another example of failed diversification? Was her hiring a purposeful attempt to avoid tokenism and diversity hiring? Only the decision-makers at Chanel can speak towards that.

Can a white person honestly do a good enough job at reaching out to marginalized communities? Do they understand enough about the racism that Black and brown people face? Can they make a difference in the systems that oppress these communities? We aren’t sure but history has shown us that the only ones who create this kind of systematic change are people who have experienced the atrocities of said system themselves.

In response to Gucci’s controversy, streetwear designer Dapper Dan was tapped to lead a predominately black “Changemakers Council.” Additionally, the brand hired a Black Vice President of Brand and Culture Engagement, Antoine Phillips. Prada recruited director Ava DuVernay and artist Theaster Gates to co-chair the Diversity and Inclusion Council after their own backlash. Likewise, H&M made their own hires after their accusations of racism. Annie Wu was instated as Global Leader of Diversity & Inclusiveness for the company and Nigerian-American Ezinne Kwubiri was made the North American lead.

Can these Black people and people of color do a better job than Pargeter just because they understand the pain of racism? Possibly but we can’t say for sure.

Of course, Twitter had a lot to say about the Chanel hiring as well.

Twitter/ @heirjordan973

This Twitter user pointed out that Chanel’s response to too few Black people and POC in their company was to hire yet another white person. It almost reads like a bad joke when it’s put that way but it is exactly what the fashion company did in this situation.

There’s no telling how impactful this hire will prove for Chanel or other members of the industry but, in the meantime, we can vote with our dollars instead. Buy from Black and POC owned brands and know for sure that your money is going directly back into marginalized communities instead of systems that would further oppress them.

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