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15 Fashion And Beauty Trends That Should Stay In The 2010s

2019 is coming to a close, and you know what that means—we’re about to begin a whole new decade. Each decade has its ups and downs, its memorably bright moments and its tragically bad trends. The last ten years brought us some crazes that really, truly slayed…but there are so many fashion and beauty trends that we hope will NOT return in the 2020s.

Spray Tan

Credit: Pinterest

The Guardian reported that the spray tan was the fastest growing area of cosmetics in 2010. Let’s just hope. Thankfully, that statistic didn’t hold up throughout the 2010s. Let’s hope it stays that way through the 2020s.

Wedge Sneakers

Credit: Pinterest

Okay, sometimes these can be pretty fly, if paired with the right outfit. And lots of celebs loved them—from Beyonce to Alicia Keys to Nicki Minaj, they were everywhere in the early-to-mid aughts. But they’re not the most functional, if you think about the fact that they’re a sneaker, and a lot of ladies complained that they (ironically) made their legs look shorter. They’re still around, though, and it wouldn’t be surprising to see them carry over into the next decade.

Couture Athleisure

Credit: Pinterest

On a similar note…athleisure?! Athleisure is just glorified sweatpants. There, I said it. But much like its weird cousin, the Wedge Sneaker, it’s likely to grossly overstay its welcome.

Cold Shoulder Cut-Out Tops

Credit: Pinterest

This is just a matter of logic, people. When you wear long sleeves, it’s probably kind of cold out, right? Why would you expose your innocent shoulders to the elements? It makes no sense. Put a real shirt on.

Glitter Roots

Credit: Pinterest

Glitter is one of those polemic things that people either love or really, really hate. Even if you fall into the former, it’s safe to say that no one is trying to keep this trend alive…glitter is hard enough to clean up, so who wants that stuff embedded in their hair? It may look cute and whimsical, but no thanks.

Heavy Contouring

Credit: Makeupandbeauty.com

Oh, the magic of contouring. No one can deny its wildly transformative powers. But in reality, contouring is something that works best when you’re in front of the camera—it’s not really for everyday life. Not only can it add unnecessary time to your morning routine, it can often have a masklike effect if not done well, and we ain’t got nothing to hide in 2020!

Single Earring

Credit: Refinery29

The single earring trend took hold in 2017 (though it started back in the 80s), and honestly—it’s tough to say whether it should stay or go. Asymmetry can be edgy and fierce, for sure, but leaving one ear completely empty? That sounds like something only Prince could pull off. Maybe it deserves a pass IF the wearer can really rock it.

Heel-less Heels

Credit: Daily Mail

Heel-less heels are often used for cosplay, which makes sense—they’re cartoonish enough to work well for a costume. And if you’re dressing up as a person whose ankles may break at any moment, they are absolutely perfect!

Bubble Nails

Credit: Pinterest

Bubble nails—or “hump” nails—are essentially fingernails in 3D. The sculpted acrylic takes on the appearance of (you guessed it!) a bubble, and even though it first came on the scene in 2009 and got pretty popular in 2015, 2020 just may not be ready for this jelly.

Clear Plastic Boots

Credit: Pinterest

Speaking of jelly, the recent clear plastic boots trend hearkens back to the jelly sandals of the 90s. There’s definitely something nostalgic about this current iteration, but boots have a tendency to make feet hot and, well, damp. Not sure how much we want to show off our sweaty feet in the years to come.

Negative Space Eyeliner

Credit: Jon Kopaloff/Getty Images

We all know the satisfaction of a perfect wing, but this negative space trend would be way too hard to master. Imagine all the time it would take to perfect that little triangle—and unlike a classic winged tip, it’s unlikely to flatter most eye shapes. Thank you, next.

Flared Nails

https://www.instagram.com/p/BV8y_WthU__/?utm_source=ig_embed

Flared nails first emerged in the early aughts, but they regained traction in 2017. Why, though?

Real Fur

Credit: Imgur

Animal activists argue that clothing made from real fur is unethical, as it unnecessarily puts animals in harm’s way and are likely to be mistreated at every level of fur and leather production. With this in mind, fur alternatives are a much better trend to pursue in 2020 and beyond—

Fake Fur

https://www.instagram.com/p/B3o1ekZgT9a/

—Or are they? The truth is, faux furs pose a major threat to the environment, as the methods and materials used to produce it are teeming with petrochemical poisons. Up-and-coming “bioleathers,” made from biodegradable and lab-grown compounds, are likely to be the best alternative that the upcoming decade will have to offer.

Man Buns

Credit: Pinterest

You either love them or you hate them. Either way, it might be okay for them to stay fossilized in the 2010s, at least for a while.

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Top Reviewed Brushes for Naturally Curly Hair

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Top Reviewed Brushes for Naturally Curly Hair

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Every curly-haired girl knows that to ensure strength and growth in their tresses, staple items are needed. From a moisturizing deep conditioner to a perfect leave-in conditioner, these staples are vital for the care and keeping of our natural hair. With the right brush, curlies can stop breakage, put an end to split ends, and see growth if that’s what they’re seeking. We searched the internet for the best brush tools for Curly Hair and put them on a list for you.

Here’s a look at the top brushes you’ll want for detangling your natural hair.

Ouidad Double Detangler Comb

Curly Hair brush
Amazon.com

Users say Ouidad’s Double Detangler is perfect for those with curly, thicker hair. The brush features double rows of comb teeth and is perfect for tackling tangles without being too forceful or rough.

“This is the best comb that I’ve ever used for detangling my hair. It detangles with ease and with a speed that I’ve never experienced and I couldn’t be happier. I have a range of 3c, 4a and 4b hair and this comb handles all of it with ease.” Amazon.com user.

Denman Brush

Curly Hair brush

An absolute classic, the Denman Brush has long been touted as the fairy godmother of brushes. Loved by 3c to 4 hair types the Denman brush has been known to dentangle its way through curlier hair pattern with a stroke of the brush.

Ladies and Gents do yourself a favor and get you a brush! My boyfriend is so shocked at my curls too! Honestly, I had never thought I could have a consistent curl pattern. The pics are 6 weeks apart but my curls never were this defined as they are with the Denman brush. I had 3B but now I am full 3C hair curl type.

I didn’t remove any rows and combined my curls with Shea Moisture Hair smoothie and some eco gel to style. Watch some youtube videos to help see how to properly brush hair out. I sectioned it into layers and even tried out bangs for the first time since the curls are so tight and I am seeing consistent coils!” – Amazon user.

Remington Detangle Brush for Curly Hair

Curly Hair

According to reviews, this electric styling tool really lives up to its name. The brush’s description says the brush’s teeth rock back and forth to loosen knots and tangles from hair without snagging or breaking your hair, working to cause less shedding. Users say that while it takes longer, the process is worth it.

“Love this detangler. I’ve been natural on and off for almost 40 years and this is the best detangler I’ve come across. It takes me longer to detangle with the vs a wide tooth comb. However, there is less shedding and breakage. I used my on wet hair with conditioner in it. My hair is more elongated after styling using this brush. I will be buying 2 as gifts,” wrote on Amazon user.

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A Woman On TikTok Gave Her Followers Insight Into What It Feels Like To Be Paralyzed

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A Woman On TikTok Gave Her Followers Insight Into What It Feels Like To Be Paralyzed

Atsushi Tomura/Getty

In 2009, the US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health reported that almost 5.4 million people in the United States live with paralysis. Still, despite how common this is, few people understand the condition of paralysis and how it affects a person’s daily life. Twenty-two-year-old Jessica Tawil, of New Jersey, recently set out to explain the experience on TikTok last year.

Since her first post in November, the TikToker has garnered over 1 million followers with content that focuses on her experience of being paralyzed from the waist down.

In a post shared on her TikTok page, Tawil explained an exercise that might give people a chance to understand the sensation of being paraplegic.

@jesstawil

#foryoupage #fyp #foryou #whatilearned #stemlife #needtoknow #weekendvibes #bekind #spinalcordinjury #productivity #disability #medical #paralyzed

♬ Epic Emotional – AShamaluevMusic

In a post shared on her TikTok page, Tawil shared an exercise with her followers that demonstrates how it feels to not be able to move a ligament. In this case, it’s your finger. According to Buzzfeed, Tawil came across the exercise after looking through posts related to disabilities. “I remember feeling so blown away because my legs felt the exact same way as my finger did,” she said.

“Not many people know too much about paraplegics and their capabilities, so I wanted to be that light to inform, educate, and even entertain people,” Tawil explained to BuzzFeed. “I want people to know what it’s like to be paralyzed … so that they can be a little bit more appreciative of what they have and remain humble.”

Tawil’s video demonstration currently has over 12 million views.

Tawil explained that a kidnapping and car accident led to her paralysis when she was in her teens.

Tawil explained that the accident took place on Nov. 15, 2014, when she went to a friend’s house in high school. When she arrived, Tawil discovered that men were present and instantly felt uncomfortable when she further learned that they had brought drugs and alcohol.

“When I eventually asked them to take me home, they took me to an abandoned road instead. When we got to this road, the driver stopped the car and put his foot on the gas and brake at the same time, doing a burnout with his wheels. He lost control of the car and crashed into a tree,” Tawil explained. “It was at this moment that I got whiplash, split my head open to the point where my skull was exposed, and sustained a spinal cord injury — leaving me paralyzed the moment we crashed,” she said. “Paramedics said that I lost the equivalence of a ‘Coca-Cola bottle of blood’ out of my head, and didn’t think I’d make it if they drove me to the hospital. So they drove me to a nearby soccer field where a helicopter airlifted me to the ICU. From there on, I went through seven months of rehab and remained permanently paralyzed and wheelchair-bound.”

Speaking about her injury, Tawil says she was “robbed of my ability to use the bathroom normally (I depend on catheters and enemas).”

Sadly Tawil says her experience led to her reclusiveness and weariness to trust others. Still, she finds that her disability comes with positives. “On the positive side, I have become a lot more spiritual and grateful to have been given another chance at life,” she told BuzzFeed. “My accident has emphasized the fact that we are not promised tomorrow, and that we should always be grateful for the simplest things in life… I also want to show people how I live my life in the present day — what is life like as a wheelchair user? — and devote my channel to being a blog where people can get to know me on a lot more of a personal level.”

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