Fierce

According To Experts, Breastfeeding Changes Your Body And Can Even Affect Your Sex Life In Really Weird Ways

Having a baby is arguably the greatest miracle of life. Rumor has it, breastfeeding your baby takes second place. Extensive research has revealed that breastfeeding can provide mother and infant all kinds of benefits including providing her with proteins that stimulate against allergies and eczema. What’s more, it can make vaccines more effective and make babies smarter. But what ways can it affect your body?

Here’s what you can expect.

1. While you breastfeed, your body releases oxytocin and prolactin, which means you’re going to feel *really* good.

@ChristianSerratos / Instagram

Breastfeeding your baby is an emotional experience. Your body becomes flooded with oxytocin when you breastfeed, which is nature’s way of ensuring mom wants to breastfeed. Every breastfeeding mammal produces is laden with casomorphin, which has a sedative effect on your baby. Your body does this to solidify the bonding experience between you and your baby.

2. That means that most moms experience mood dips when they stop breastfeeding.

@phbulous / Instagram

Of course, some moms are very happy to scrap their nursing bras, while others can suffer from hormonal mood swings once they wean. One way to help prevent a severe mood dip is by weaning very slowly. An abrupt stop to breastfeeding might feel like whiplash to your body, which has been flooded with oxytocin and prolactin for months at this point.

3. You lose 5 to 10 percent of your bone mass within the first six months of breastfeeding.

@megandoesnola / Instagram

University of Pittsburgh’s own associate professor of endocrinology, Mara Horwitz, says that, in order to ensure the baby is getting enough calcium, the body takes it directly from the mother’s own bones.

4. You have a higher risk of gum disease.

@healyourselfwithnature / Instagram

While you’re pregnant, your hormones change, and you lose the estrogen that is typically there to protect your bones, so once you start breastfeeding, you start leeching calcium like crazy. That lack of calcium also leads to an increase in risk for gum disease. In order to combat this lack of calcium, it’s important to take at least 1,000 milligrams of calcium daily. Think dark leafy greens, fortified orange juice or fortified almond milk, and it will help.

5. The good news is that you’ll eventually have stronger, healthier bones than you did before.

@lalecheleagueusa / Instagram

According to a 2012 study by Osteoporosis International, women who breastfeed for 33 months or longer eventually have stronger, larger bones than moms with less than 12 months of breastfeeding.

6. Your boobs are about to hurt way more often.

@lalecheleagueusa / Instagram

Except, this time, it won’t be your body’s monthly warning that your period is on its way. For the first few weeks of breastfeeding, when your boobs start to ache, it means you need to wake up Bebé and feed her. You can take a warm shower before nursing to help with milk flow and will have to apply cool compresses to your breasts between feedings.

7. You may notice hard, marble-sized lumps in your breasts.

@24kspray / Instagram

That’s also normal. If you’re breastfeeding still, it may be a clogged milk duct, resolved by massaging the area as you breastfeed until that side goes dry. If you’ve already weaned, it’s likely your body absorbing its own milk.

8. Your boobs are going to deflate after weaning, pero no te preocupes–they’ll perk up in six months.

@florkubana.style / Instagram

If you’re starting to feel at all anxious about the entire breastfeeding process, remember that everything is temporary. Once you “dry up”, it might feel like your boobs are hangin’ low, but that’s just a natural temporary loss of fat. As your body comes back to equilibrium, fat will return to your boobs.

9. While breastfeeding, you may experience vaginal dryness, tightness or tenderness.

@ursuburbanhippie / Instagram

That’s because your body has produced lower estrogen levels while breastfeeding. Some women experience a lower libido while others experience a higher libido while breastfeeding. Either way, you can absolutely use a lubricant to relieve the symptoms and go about your business.

10. Your breasts might leak while you have sex.

kyraamoore_/ Instagram

Don’t fret. It’s the most normal thing in the world for you to squirt breastmilk when you’re feeling aroused. It’s also far more common to not want to have sex at all, given the body’s production of prolactin, which you need to produce breastmilk, but which also decreases the libido.

11. The longer you breastfeed, the longer break you’re likely to get from a period.

@oakandhoneyphoto / Instagram

Some women get their period immediately after birth, though they aren’t typically ovulating until six months later. Far more often, while mothers are breastfeeding, they’re also delaying their period. Breastfeeding is high energy work.

12. You’ll probably lose weight while breastfeeding.

@wonder_woman_marlene / Instagram

Breastfeeding burns an average of 200 to 500 calories per day, and you’ll want to make sure you’re eating as often as you’re hungry to ensure optimal nutrition to the Bebé.

13. For mothers with a history of carpel tunnel, you may need extra support while breastfeeding.

@ursuburbanhippie / Instagram

Make sure you relax your grip on Bebé and have enough pillows to support your arm (one under the arm), your back and even between your legs. Stretch your fingers and circle your wrists between feedings.

A Video Of A Woman Singing ‘Fallaste Corazón’ To Her Abuelo With Dementia Is Going Viral After He Remembered The Lyrics

Things That Matter

A Video Of A Woman Singing ‘Fallaste Corazón’ To Her Abuelo With Dementia Is Going Viral After He Remembered The Lyrics

We all know that growing old is inevitable in this life and that our days on Earth are numbered. Regardless of that truth, it’s human nature to either feel afraid of growing old or to feel melancholy when it comes to thinking of growing old. What can be even more painful is seeing our parents, our aunts and uncles, or our grandparents growing old and imagining a life without them in it. 

Last week, one woman on Twitter shared a video of her grandfather who has dementia singing along with her to “Fallaste Corazón” by Pedro Infante in a fleeting moment of lucidness. 

In the video, you can see the woman singing with such passion to her grandfather who is attentively watching her sing and who later begins to sing along to the lyrics as well.

 Dayis, on Twitter, shared that her “tata” doesn’t remember a lot of things due to his dementia but in an effort to help him with his dementia, she sings to him every day. 

“Today he remembered the song fallaste corazón and I swear I was trying so hard not to cry,” she writes. “This many is my life.”

According to Alzheimers.net, there are many reasons as to why music boosts brain activity.

According to the site, “musical aptitude and appreciation” are two of the last remaining abilities in dementia patients, music can bring emotional and physical closeness, music can shift moods and stimulate positive interactions, and it evokes emotions that bring back memories.

Since musical aptitude and appreciation are the last remaining abilities in patients with Alzheimer’s and dementia, “music is an excellent way to reach beyond the disease and reach the person.” In later stages of dementia, patients are also prone to losing the ability to share emotions with their caregivers or family members but through music, they can still reach that emotional and physical closeness they once had. Further, singing to and with dementia patients is engaging and it leads to patients “exercising more mind power than usual.” 

People who saw the touching video on social media were not only quick to share their reactions after watching it but they also shared their own personal experiences with family members and loved ones who had dementia. 

One Twitter user replied to @Dayannagmusic03 and shared that they couldn’t stop watching the video. 

The Twitter user went on to say that their grandfather also has dementia but notices sometimes that “something around him has triggered a memory” and to see that, they said, is the best feeling in the world. 

The woman who initially posted the video shared that her “tata” is currently on “stage 6” of dementia and although it’s been a long and rough battle, “he always seems to remember certain songs.”

“When he does, it warms my heart with joy,” she continued to write on Twitter. 

It’s safe to say the video had a lot of people in their feels and rightfully so.

We love to see raw and touching moments like these. 

The 0:50 mark made us ugly cry too.

This is right when her grandfather starts to faintly sing along with her and man, she sings with so much emotion too. 

Other folks on Twitter sent their blessings to her family and her grandfather.

We hope her grandfather continues to have more moments like this. 

People on Twitter also compared the heartwarming video to the movie Coco.

Remember the scene toward the end of the film when Miguel sings to Mamá Coco and she begins to remember? I’m not crying, YOU’RE CRYING. 

Others said what we’re all thinking… just thinking about our parents, aunts, uncles, and grandparents getting old hurts a little bit more as we keep getting older ourselves. 

We’d like to keep believing their invincible and will live forever. 

Another Twitter user @missmalindakat tweeted that she had never seen anyone sing with more “heart and passion” than in that video.

One Twitter user shared her own video of her grandfather in a similar situation who also seemed to remember the lyrics to “El Rey” by Vicente Fernández when her great aunt sang it to him.

It’s touching to see other folks sharing their similar experiences and videos in an effort to support one another. This video has also amassed over 47,000 views on Twitter. 

Listen to “Fallaste Corazón” in full on YouTube below:

One Latina Talks About Breaking Down The Walls Of Stigma In The Latinx Community

Fierce

One Latina Talks About Breaking Down The Walls Of Stigma In The Latinx Community

Maskot / Getty Images

In an ideal world, we would all play active roles in breaking down the mental health stigma. Dinner talks would be filled with

 “¿Mijo, cómo te has sentido?” 

“¿Cómo vas con tu medicina?” or

“¿Sigues yendo a yoga?” 

Showing emotion would be encouraged and vulnerability would be praised. 

But you and I both know, this isn’t the case when it comes to the world we live in. Growing up in the Central Valley, surrounded by what seemed like endless tomato fields, with two farm-working parents, I will be the first to admit that conversations about mental health were non-existent. Up until my last year of undergrad, I believed that anxiety attacks were an over-exaggeration of weak, pitiful people who couldn’t handle a little stress. Until of course, it happened to me. I suffered my first anxiety attack one night during my last semester at Fresno State. It was one of the scariest things I’ve ever experienced, and it changed my life forever. 

During the years that followed, I fought against cultural norms. For me, nothing else had worked, so I said ‘yes’ to therapy and anxiety medication, even when my family opposed it or didn’t quite understand it. It was hard. I felt misunderstood and out of place. I was conflicted about how people would judge me and my family if they found out that I sought outside help. 

But I am happy to report that things did get better. Therapy and medication helped tremendously, and my parents eventually came around to supporting my decision to seek help, primarily because they began to see the progress I was making. 

So yes, even though these conversations are tough, I believe they are absolutely necessary to ensure the wellbeing of our families and our future generations. Mental health conversations have to become an integral part of our families, especially within the cultural context.

There’s no doubt about it, the Latinx culture is beautiful! Its richness is felt in the music, food and strong family values. However, many aspects of the culture are not conducive for growth. Not being able to comfortably talk about our mental health because of the ensuing stigma is definitely one of them. Truth is, if we want to move our Latinx families forward, we must find ways to play a role in normalizing mental health conversations within our traditional families. There is no room for inaction. 

The good news is, you don’t have to be a hardcore mental health advocate to help! 

Empowered Bystanders Matter

We can choose to either be an empowered bystander or play an active role in this. Both can be equally important in normalizing these conversations. First, we must acknowledge that not everyone wants to be outspoken and actively pushing change forward. Regardless, empowered bystanders can still make a difference with what may seem like small insignificant acts. 

Here is how you can help as an empowered bystander: 

Withdraw from toxic dialogue.

Oftentimes within traditional family dynamics, we witness ideologies that are toxic for people experiencing mental health issues. Conversations in family reunions can sometimes be offensive and discouraging. As an empowered bystander, you have a choice to partake in this dialogue or completely withdraw from it. By simply choosing not to laugh at an offensive joke, for example, you take a subtle yet firm stance that you are not here for this, you do not agree with this behavior. 

Compare apples to apples.

You may not suffer from a mental health issue, but you can still observe and pinpoint opportunities for conversation. Hypothetically speaking, let’s say one of your siblings is contemplating taking medication for their mental health but is discouraged by your parent who says things like: 

“¡You don’t need that, you are not crazy,” or

“¡Que locuras! Mejor ponte a limpiar tu cuarto, es lo que debes de hacer!” 

As an empowered bystander, you have the power to respectfully interject and propose an idea like:

“Pa, how is that different from you taking your daily blood pressure medicine, you take that every day for you to function.”

In doing so, you suddenly propose a new thought, a new perspective. You don’t force change; you simply ask questions and initiate thoughtful conversations.  

For those of us who are personally impacted by mental health issues, and feel strongly about creating change, here is how you can help as an active participant: 

Embody and embrace the rebel persona. 

Within the cultural family context, we must acknowledge that taking an active role in breaking the mental health stigma often comes with feeling isolated. We will not always fit in. Understanding this upfront will make it easier to cope. We have to understand that our immediate family will not always be our frontline cheerleaders. This is 100% okay. Whether we receive support within our family or not, it is vital that we seek some type of support, through friendships or support groups. 

Be the example.

Do you suffer from a mental health issue? Do you take medication? Do you go to therapy? Living without shame and using your experiences to offer insight and a different perspective in conversations with folks is key to normalizing this subject within our families. Own your experiences, so they become the shining light for others struggling to find their voice. Showing them that you can thrive with your condition is the best type of education we can provide to our families.

To check out Your Story to Tell Academy’s Instagram go here.