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A Latina Photographer Recreated 6 Iconic Afro-Latina Portraits And The Results Are Stunning

Linda Nieves-Powell is the woman behind the photos recreating iconic Latina photos and now she’s back with a brand new photo project focusing on Afro-Latina musicians. Nieves-Powell told mitú that the idea to recreate the photos of Latinas came when she was photographing some of her friends and realized that there aren’t many Latinas in the photography world. With that, she set out to do something positive with photography and social media and recreate some of the most iconic portraits of Afro-Latinas…

Irene Cara, the Grammy-winning singer of “What A Feeling.”

marz-thatsentertainment / BlogSpot / Linda Nieves-Powell
CREDIT: marz-thatsentertainment / BlogSpot / Linda Nieves-Powell

“I had been thinking for some time of creating a photography project that features Latinas and by chance I came across an old photo of Rita Moreno on the cover of Life magazine, on my Facebook timeline,” Linda Nieves-Powell told mitú.. “That picture sparked the idea to create a tribute to trailblazers, but at the same time I knew this could be so much bigger than just re-creations.”

La India, the Princess of Salsa.

ElektroBeatz1 / YouTube / Linda Nieves-Powell
CREDIT: ElektroBeatz1 / YouTube / Linda Nieves-Powell

“In my research, I noticed that Afro-Latina musicians, at least the ones that I had found, possessed an incredible sense of style and seemed to revel in their individuality,” Nieves-Powell explained to mitú. “Who doesn’t want to pose as Celia Cruz with those amazing hats and multi-colored wigs?”

La Lupe, the Queen of Latin Soul.

jordanvkifer / Tumblr / Linda Nieves-Powell
CREDIT: jordanvkifer / Tumblr / Linda Nieves-Powell

“When I began doing the research for this series, I already knew I would be looking for models to pose as Celia Cruz, and La Lupe, as they are two of the most recognized Afro-Latinas in the entertainment industry,” Nieves-Powell told mitú. “It was when I came across the photos of Irene Cara and Esperanza Spalding that I noticed the pattern. I tend to like working in themes and decided that this series would feature Afro-Latinas in music.”

Lisa “Left Eye” Lopes, late member of TLC.

@Melanin_World / Twitter / Linda Nieves-Powell
CREDIT: @Melanin_World / Twitter / Linda Nieves-Powell

For Nieves-Powell, it is important now more than ever to own our brownness and celebrate our contributions to this country. “We find ourselves in 2017 with an administration determined to see brown people go back to where they came from. However, many Americans who endorse that idea ironically don’t know why cities and states are named San Francisco, Los Angeles, San Antonio, Montana, Florida, Arizona, and Colorado,” Nieves-Powell told mitú. “These Spanish names merely hint at our contributions to this country. It’s important to remember and remind ourselves of that. Latina Icons allows me to do that in my way. I feel that artists often have to be the change they want to see. We can do it through many mediums. I chose photography.”

Esperanza Spalding, Grammy winner for Best New Artist in 2011.

@msrosiloves / Twitter / Linda Nieves-Powell
CREDIT: @msrosiloves / Twitter / Linda Nieves-Powell

Powell also explained how she considers people as iconic. “For me the word iconic should not be limited to just those individuals who are considered trailblazers. I think the iconic in Latina Icons, can also include a single mother who is holding it down for the family while pursuing her dream job,” Nieves-Powell told mitú. “So what makes someone iconic to me is strength, determination, fearlessness, authenticity, cultural pride, vision, and above all a clear sense of self. Someone who doesn’t use societal standards as the gauge to measure her greatness but instead creates her own benchmark for excellence.”

Celia Cruz, Cuban-born salsa icon with 23 gold albums.

cosmosonic / Tumblr / Linda Nieves-Powell
CREDIT: cosmosonic / Tumblr / Linda Nieves-Powell

“I see Latina Icons as a way of promoting Latina excellence, celebrating Latinidad, and documenting our evolution, as well as providing a reference to the past,” Nieves-Powell told mitú about her hopes for more photo series. “I see a series depicting Ivy League bound Latinas, Entrepreneurs who are working on their million dollar ideas, and yes, Latinas in aeronautics would be such an inspiring series.”

Check out the video below!

Latina Icons Is Shedding Light On Iconic Afro-Latina Icons, And It’s Just Beginning

Posted by We are mitú on Thursday, February 16, 2017


READ: 13 Celebs You Probably Didn’t Know Were Afro-Latino


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Selena Gomez Releases New Spanish-Language Single ‘De Una Vez’ and Teases Full Spanish Album: ‘I’m Targeting My Heritage’

Entertainment

Selena Gomez Releases New Spanish-Language Single ‘De Una Vez’ and Teases Full Spanish Album: ‘I’m Targeting My Heritage’

Photo via selenagomez/Instagram

Good news, Selenators! Word on the street is that Selena Gomez will soon be dropping her first-ever Spanish language album. The rumors started after Gomez dropped a surprising (and beautiful!) new Spanish-language single, “De Una Vez”.

Soon after the single dropped, rumors of a full Spanish-language studio album began to swirl when murals promoting “De Una Vez” and a yet-unreleased single “Baila Conmigo” popped up across, Mexico.

To make matters even better, Selena already dropped “De Una Vez”‘s music video.

The lush and imaginative video has been garnering praise for its inclusion of Latin American visuals and symbols. Gomez hired Tania Verduzco and Adrian Perez to direct her video–a husband and wife team who hail from Mexico and Spain, respectively and go by the moniker Los Pérez.

Of hiring Spanish speakers to direct her video, Gomez revealed to Vogue online that the decision was intentional. “If I was going to completely immerse myself into a project inspired by Latin culture, I wanted to work with native Spanish speaking creators,” she said.

And indeed, Verduzco and Perez tried to infuse as much Latin spirit into the video’s conception as possible.

“Magical realism has always been part of the Latin culture, whether it be in art or telenovelas,” Gomez told Vogue. “I wanted [to capture] that sense of a supernatural world.”

They accomplished this sense of magical realism by utilizing motifs from Mexican folk art, like Milagro, which is symbolized by the glowing heart that is beating within Gomez’s chest throughout the video.

“We wanted to play with powerful language and images. We designed the heart—we call it the Milagro in Mexican culture—and its light to be a metaphor for the healing throughout the story,” Verduzco told Vogue.

Selena Gomez fans are especially excited about this project because Gomez has long hinted at her desire to release a Spanish-language album.

Back in 2011, Gomez tweeted about her plans to eventually record an entire album in Spanish. “Can’t wait for y’all to hear the Spanish record;) it’s sounding so cool,” she wrote.

She retweeted the sentiment on Thursday with the comment: “I think it will be worth the wait”–which many fans took as confirmation that a full studio album is on its way.

It’s worth noting that Gomez has already dipped her toe into the Latin music scene with 2010’s “Un Año Sin Lluvia” and 2018’s DJ Snake, Ozuna and Cardi B collab, “Taki Taki”.

As for the difficulty of recording songs in a second language, Gomez said that it was a practice that came naturally.

“I actually think I sing better in Spanish. That was something I discovered,” she said in an interview for Apple Music. “It was a lot of work, and look, you cannot mispronounce anything. It is something that needed to be precise, and needed to be respected by the audience I’m going to release this for.”

She continued: “Of course I want everyone to enjoy the music, but I am targeting my fan base. I’m targeting my heritage, and I couldn’t be more excited.”

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A Brazilian Photographer Is Documenting Indigenous Tribes In The Amazon

Culture

A Brazilian Photographer Is Documenting Indigenous Tribes In The Amazon

ricardostuckert / Instagram

Indigenous tribes are the most important connection between man and nature. These tribes have lived off the land before modern society and many have never interacted with modern society. Ricardo Stuckert is going through and documenting the indigenous Amazonian tribes in Brazil.

Ricardo Stuckert is photographing indigenous tribespeople in the Brazilian Amazon.

The indigenous community is something sacred that most people agrees should be protected. They are more connected to the land than we are. Their customs and traditions are more ingrained in this world than ours are and it is so important to protect them.

The indigenous community of Brazil has been subjected to horrible attacks and conditions from the Brazilian government.

One of the most widespread attacks against the indigenous Brazilians living in the Amazon has been for the land. President Jair Bolsonaro has tried to take land away from the indigenous communities to allow for logging and mining. A bill he sent to the congress sought to exploit the land for commercial purposes, even legalizing some of the attacks we have seen on indigenous people since President Bolsonaro took power.

Stuckert wants to preserve the indigenous culture and customs through photos.

“I think it is important to disseminate Brazilian culture and show the way that native peoples live today,” Stuckert told DailyMail. “In 1997, I started to photograph the Amazon and had my first contact with the native people of Brazil. Since then, I have tried to show the diversity and plurality of indigenous culture, as well as emphasize the importance of the Indians as guardians of the forest. There are young people who are being born who have never seen or will see an Indian in their lives.”

The photographer believes that using photography is the best way to share culture.

“I think that photography has this power to transpose a culture like this to thousands of people,” Stuckert told DailyMail. “The importance of documentary photojournalism is to undo stigmas and propagate a culture that is being lost. We need to show the importance of indigenous people to the world, for the protection of our forests.”

You can see all of Stuckert’s photos on his Instagram.

Stuckert’s work to documented the indigenous community is giving people an insight into a life many never see. Brazil is home to about 210 million people with around 1 million having indigenous heritage. The diverse indigenous community of Brazil is something important to showcase and that’s what Stuckert is doing.

READ: Indigenous Photographer Diego Huerta’s Photos Of Oaxaca’s Indigenous People Celebrates Their Beauty

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