Entertainment

These Celebrities Will Prove That Capricorns Are Hard Workers Who Thrive By Nature

Full disclosure: you won’t find Rihanna on this list (Pisces), but we can all agree that her song “Work” is the anthem of Capricorns around the world. Capricorns are of the earth, which can make them grounded, level-headed people, but can also make them inflexible and stubborn. Igual.

These Capricorns have relentlessly climbed to the top of their industries, know how to work and play hard. Their zodiac symbol is an actual goat, you guys. Meet the G.O.A.T.s of our generation.

1. Naya Rivera

CREDIT: @nayarivera / Instagram

Born and raised in Santa Clarita from January 12, 1987, onward, Rivera has been working since she was a baby, appearing in commercials for Kmart. When she was just 4 years old, she received a Young Artist Award nomination for her performance on The Royal Family.

2. Pitbull

CREDIT: @pitbull / Instagram

Formally known at birth (January 15, 1981) as Armando Christian Pérez, Pitbull has now become Mr. Worldwide. He’s literally started from nothing, the son of Cuban immigrants, and has built himself an empire.

3. Elizabeth Rodriguez

CREDIT: @theonlyelizabethrodriguez / Instagram

Born on December 27, 1974, Rodriguez has climbed the performance ladder. We all know her as Aleida in Orange is the New Black, but most don’t know that she’s already a Tony award winner for her performance in a 2011 play, The Motherfucker with the Hat. Are we not surprised?

4. Junot Díaz

CREDIT: @brainpicker / Twitter

Right under Cardi B, Junot Díaz is probably the most famous Dominican-American alive, with a Pulitzer Prize under his belt. The famous poet was born on December 31, 1968, in Santo Domingo.

5. Ricky Martin

CREDIT: @bananabusiness / Twitter

Our favorite boy band star grown up, Ricky Martin was actually born on Christmas Eve. Martin has been world-famous since he was just a boy, making Capricorns everywhere proud.

6. Héctor Elizondo

CREDIT: @mooveeblog / Instagram

The only Princess Diaries character that matters just turned 82 years old on December 22, 2018. Fun fact: Boricua Elizondo studied dance at Carnegie Hall when he was a young teen.

7. Isabella Castillo Díaz

CREDIT: @isabellacastillodv / Instagram

Born in Havana, Isabella Castillo Díaz is best known as Grachi en Grachi. Most people don’t know that while she was born on December 23, 1994, in Cuba, she emigrated to Belize by age three y despues a Miami. Literally, like any Capricorn, she’s been working since she was five years old.

8. Juan Gabriel

CREDIT: @soyjuangabriel_ / Instagram

Born as Alberto Aguilera Valadez on January 7, 1950, Mexico, world-famous singer Juan Gabriel was one of the most prolific songwriters in the world. Throughout his life, he sold over 200 million copies of his albums worldwide.

9. Diego Luna

CREDIT: @diegoluna_ / Instagram

Born December 29, 1979, Luna is only 39 years old and is already a famous Mexican actor, director, and producer, influencing films like Y tu mamá tambiénMilkRudo y Cursi, and Rogue One: A Star Wars StoryHe and Gael Garcia Bernal own Canana Films together, no big deal.

10. Don Francisco

CREDIT: @donfranciscotv / Instagram

Famous television host Don Francisco was born on December 28, 1940, in Chile to German Jewish refugees who fled the Holocaust. Como Capricorns everywhere, he’s worked to have the world’s longest running TV variety show, meeting all the stars. Buena trabajo, Don Francisco.

11. Jose Alfredo Jimenez

CREDIT: @josealfredistas / Instagram

Born on January 19, 1926, Jiménez helped define Mexican rancheras as we know them. The rumor goes that he didn’t know how to play a single instrument, but composed over 1,000 songs, some of which were sung by the likes of Selena and Julio Iglesias. Buen trabajo.

12. Madison de la Garza

CREDIT: @maddelagarza / Instagram

Born on December 28, 2001, you might not recognize this young star, but you’ll remember her as la hija de Eva Longoria, Juanita Solis, on Desperate Housewives. She’s also Demi Lovato’s younger half-sister.

13. Ricardo Arjona

CREDIT: @ricardoarjona / Instagram
Born on January 19, 1964, Arjona is the most successful Guatemalan singer-songwriter of all time, with more than 80 million albums sold. Oh, and he also toured with Guatemala’s national basketball team and has the record for most points scored in a single game by a Guatemalan. Overachiever.

14. Yandel

CREDIT: @yandel / Instagram

Puerto Rican reggaeton singer, Yandel, of Wisin & Yandel, was born January 14, 1977, in Cayey, Puerto Rico. The family is very important to Capricorns, and Yandel proves it over and over again. He married his long-time novia, Edneris Espada Figuero fifteen years ago and together they have two teenage kids.

15. Samantha Boscarino

CREDIT: @sambosco_10 / Twitter

Born on December 26, 1994, in Ventura County, Boscarino is Ecuadorian y Italian. You might remember her as Alicia Rivera in The Clique.

16. Wilson Cruz

CREDIT: @wcruz73 / Instagram

Born December 27, 1973, in Brooklyn, Cruz broke out as a star in the early 1990s while being an openly gay man of Puerto Rican descent, a feat worth celebrating alone. Add the fact that his first break-out role was in the now cult classic TV series My So-Called Life about Rickie Vasquez, a gay teen, and we’ve got a fully developed Capricorn getting what’s theirs.

17. Amoury Nolasco

CREDIT: @amaurynolasco / Instagram

Another Christmas Eve baby, Nolasco was born in Puerto Rico to Dominican immigrants but moved to the Big Apple to pursue his career in acting. Like a Cap, he made it in series like CSI, and ER, eventually moving onto the movies in 2 Fast 2 Furious, Transformers and Prison Break.

18. David Archueleta

CREDIT: @davidarchie / Instagram

Remember this American Idol icon who earned the second spot in American Idol’s seventh season? The Honduran was born on December 28, 1990, in Miami, and like every Capricorn on this list, he’s been actually winning competitions since he was ten years old at the Utah Talent Competition.

19. Marco Antonio Solís

CREDIT: @marcoantoniosolis_oficial / Instagram

Born December 29, 1959, Solís has been performing since he was just six years old. Solís has won five Latin Grammy Awards, two Lo Nuestro Awards and has his own star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

20. Jesus Cristo

CREDIT: @GabrielAlvesS18 / Twitter

You thought I’d leave out the most famous Capricorn in Latin culture? Psh, no. Next time your mami tells you that you’re such a stubborn Capricorn, tell her not to take the Lord’s name in vain.


READ: 2019’s Zodiac Wheel de la Fortuna: Your Financial Future According to Your Sign

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Four Years After His Last Music Was Released, Neon Indian Comes Back To Music With Spanish Song ‘Toyota Man’

Entertainment

Four Years After His Last Music Was Released, Neon Indian Comes Back To Music With Spanish Song ‘Toyota Man’

alan_palomo / Instagram

Amidst President Trump’s impeachment hearings, a new protest song is making the rounds online. Except this one sounds more like a festive, satirical and catchy tune; rather than a political critique. Just last week, Neon Indian dropped his first song in Spanish “Toyota Man” after four years of not releasing any new music. The pro-immigration anthem references classics like Selena’s “Bidi Bidi Bom Bom” and Miley Cyrus’s “Party in the U.S.A.” The song talks about migrant laborers, the American dream, and DACA recipients in a catchy and witty way. 

Alan Palomo aka Neon Indian dropped his new single last week, “Toyota Man,” with a self-directed video that tells his immigration story. 

Palomo’s video for “Toyota Man” opens with himself standing at the U.S.-Mexico border flipping through cue cards. “Llegamos al apartamento cuatro de un tío después que cruzamos el río en Reynosa.”  Born in Monterrey, Mexico, the Chillwave singer tells the story of his crossing the border through Reynosa on to San Antonio and Austin. Once in ‘el otro lado’ he gets hired to wash Toyota trucks. The musician takes a rag to a red vehicle in what could be an ode to American underground experimental filmmaker, Kenneth Anger’s “Kustom Kar Kommandos,” 

Fiestas, piñatas, tacos, and abuelas, the satirical video is all about representing Alan Palomo’s Mexican culture.

Credit: Neon Indian / YouTube

At a backyard party featuring the classic taquiza and piñatas, a  Trump-shaped piñata comes to life and makes a run for it. The 45th president  duels with an abuela, and gets chased by children to the sound of the chorus “Venimos a estudiar, queremos trabajar, y aunque lo quieran negar, todos somos Americanos” Spanish for “we come to study, we want to work and even if they want to deny it, we’re all American.” There’s also a puppet show about migrant labor, a cowboy giving birth to cars and a lot more weird stuff going on before the Trump-ñata gets hits by a car and spills green cards all over the road.

The pro-immigrant anthem speaks to the American dream.

Credit: alan_palomo / Instagram

Palomo calls out Uncle Sam for all the obstacles the U.S. government has put in place to ensure that immigrants find it hard to achieve success and stability. He talks about citizenship trials, labor rights violations, ’Aquí tu no cuentas igual,’ he sings. “Though my music has always been generally apolitical,” Alan Palomo said in a statement to Pitchfork, “I realized when recording this song that it was impossible to write biographically (in the rhetorical context of the Trump administration) without being entirely that: political. The story of my family, which before felt commonly American, was suddenly politicized.”

Palomo’s first song in Spanish, “Toyota Man” takes from a variety of both Mexican and American classic tunes.

Credit: alan_palomo / Instagram

The beat of the Mexican folk song “La Cucaracha,” plays in the riff of ‘Toyota Man’. Palomo mentions “The Star-Spangled Banner,” Selena’s “Bidi Bidi Bom Bom” and Miley Cyrus’s “Party in the U.S.A.” “Te tienes que aguantar hasta que no te puedan deportar, asi es este party in the U.S.A.”

But above all, ‘Toyota Man’ is a satirical pro-immigration Latino song.

Credit: alan_palomo / Instagram

“Recognizing the absurdity of it all,” said Palomo in a statement, “I thought it would be refreshing to address the social narrative around immigration through comedy — nods to Benny Hill, misremembered San Antonio car commercials, and School House Rock. My family and I had a ton of fun making this and I hope it’s equally as fun to watch.”

“Toyota Man” is Neon Indian’s first track since his 2015 album.

Credit: alan_palomo / Instagram

The track is Palomo’s first new single since his 2015 album, “VEGA INTL. Night School” and his all-star Prince tribute in 2016. The tone and sound of his new song “Toyota Man,” hints at a new direction for the indie-rock artist. He’s talked about singing in his native language for a while, and if this track is any indication, perhaps we can expect more personal, political works from Neon Indian, and hopefully, a new album is in the works.

Neon Indian is nearing the end of a fall U.S. tour that wraps up on Nov. 29 in Salt Lake City, Utah.

READ: These Drug Smugglers Left The Internet Laughing At Their Less Than Intelligent Attempts At Smuggling Drugs

7 of the Most Racist Tropes in Disney Movies

Entertainment

7 of the Most Racist Tropes in Disney Movies

Disney

On November 12th, Disney launched its much-anticipated streaming service Disney+, a platform that offers over 7,000 television episodes and 500 films of Disney titles to its subscribers. And while the influx of beloved Disney content is exciting, some Disney fans can’t help but cringe at the outdated, stereotypical tropes that some of the House of Mouse’s older content employed. And while racist tropes and offensive stereotypes were par for the course decades ago, we are now living in a world where sensitive cultural representation in the media is of the utmost importance. 

Aware of people’s lowered tolerance for racism in their entertainment, Disney+ has issued content warnings on some of their titles. The warning reads: “This program is presented as originally created. It may contain outdated cultural depictions”. And while some are applauding Disney for acknowledging the problematic nature of some of their content, others don’t think that a mere content warning is enough. Others are calling for Disney to make a greater effort to reckon with their problematic legacy. In light of these development, here are seven of the most racist moments in Disney movies that you can look out for when deciding on your next Disney+ viewing.

1. The Siamese Cats in “Lady and the Tramp”

@lcrowde8/Twitter

When “Lady and the Tramp” was released in 1955, it wasn’t unusual for the entertainment industry to create characters based on offensive stereotypes of what they believed people of Asian descent acted like. One of the most offensive instances of this were there characters “Si” and “Am” in “Lady and the Tramp”–two mischievous and troublesome cats who come into Lady’s home and make a mess, which Lady is ultimately blamed for. It doesn’t help that the cats are illustrated with slanted eyes and sing with broken accents. 

2. Everything about “Song of the South”

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Probably the most offensive and problematic of all Disney movies, “Song of the South” was released in 1946. It follows the story of a young boy who befriends Uncle Remus, a former slave who teaches him about life through a series of fables. The movie is upsetting for many reasons, one of which is the way the movie expresses nostalgia for the pre-Civil War way of life–which even the movie’s black characters seem to long for. The song “Song of the South” is the perfect example of this, where a black choir sings, “This heart of mine is in the heart of Dixie. That’s where I belong”. 

3. The Crows in “Dumbo”

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The crows in “Dumbo” are a play on blackface minstrel characters that much of the American audience would’ve been familiar with at the time of “Dumbo”‘s release in 1941. To add insult to injury, the character of Jim Crow (yes, that’s actually his name), was voiced by white actor Cliff Edwards, voicing an exaggerated version of a stereotypical black Southern voice. In “Dumbo”, Jim is depicted as lazy, dumb, and indulgent. This offensive stereotype of black people was well-known in the South. 

4. Sunflower in “Fantasia”

@WookieJohn/Twitter

In the original “Fantasia” released in 1940, the movie features a little black character named Sunflower. Sunflower was a black little girl with the body of a donkey. She was drawn with dark skin, an over-exaggerated nose and lips and braids in her hair. From her brief appearance in the movie, her apparent purpose in life was to help the glamorous white centaurs with their beauty routine (she was shown as filing the nails of a centaur). In later version, her character was cropped out completely of the movie to avoid a public outcry. 

5. “What Makes a Red Man Red?” in “Peter Pan”

@WookieJohn/Twitter

The racism inherent in “Peter Pan” is laid out plainly in the song “What Makes a Red Man Red?” that Neverland’s tribe of Native Americans sings to explain their history to the Lost Boys. The song is meant to be the origin story of how Native Americans got their skin color. The lyrics are as follows: “Let’s go back a million years/To the very first Injun prince/He kissed a maid and start to blush/And we’ve all been blushin’ since”. 

6. “Arabian Nights” in “Aladdin”

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Critics of “Aladdin” have long called the movie problematic for the way it depicts people of Middle Eastern descent and how it fails to illustrate the differences between various Middle Eastern cultures. Instead, the Kingdom of Agraba is a mish-mash of various cultures of the Middle East which implies that the cultures are interchangeable. And don’t forget the most problematic pat of the movie, the song “Arabian Nights” that contains the following lyrics: “I come from a land…Where they cut off your ear if they don’t like your face. It’s barbaric, but hey, it’s home”.

7. Shun Gon in “The Aristocats”

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The Chinese cat Shun Gon in “The Aristocats” is another prime example of a racist character that Disney employed in their earlier movies. Shun Gon is a member of O’Malley the Alley Cat’s street gang. He speaks in broken English, has slanted eyes and prominent teeth, and plays the piano with chopsticks. In other words, it doesn’t get more offensive that this.