Entertainment

Young Cardi B Is Dropping Some Truth In Some Of The Funniest Memes On The Internet

Cardi B has been dropping albums and collabs left and right, working straight through her pregnancy. In the mere ten days since Baby Kulture Kiari Cephas was born, the Internet has taken to turning a 5-year-old “Young Cardi” photo into all the memes.

We are definitely hoping that Baby Kulture has all the same sass that her mama was born with.

Cardi B started it by offering up the pic and asking the Internet to make a meme.

CREDIT: @iamcardib / Instagram

The Bardi gang got to work and it quickly became a “My mama said” meme.

Caption: “😂😂😂😂😂😂😂too funny cause i was a smart ass like this 😩😩😩”

But then she took the photo and request down.

CREDIT: @iamcardib / Instagram

… and instead regrammed this very relatable baby Cardi meme asking the Internet to leave her alone.

Caption: “Yaaaa annoying for this 😩😩😩😩😂Leave five year old Belcalis alone 😤😤”

But we just couldn’t stop: A History Lesson Meme.

CREDIT: Untitled. Digital Image. Latina. 20 July 2018.

Any Latino: “Baby Belcalis, your mommy is right, como siempre. Don’t trust your teachers. Mentirosas.”

Honest Bardi being honest.

CREDIT: @chillselfcare / Twitter

BAHAHA–every kid takes offense to being assumed younger than they are, and you can just see Cardi being that kid.

Soon, people started Snapping Young Cardi into their day to day lives.

CREDIT: @MarieIssaBaddie / Twitter

Every older brother ever: “WHY ME? Go tell mom ___________.”

Young Cardi: Repeats “Well…Mom said you have to take me with you.”

Young Cardi for Justice

CREDIT: @MarieIssaBaddie / Twitter

Because every young kid’s equality bone flairs up when it comes to cookies. They’re always watching, so don’t expect to binge in peace anymore.

7. Nosy Young Bardi

CREDIT: @MarieIssaBaddie / Twitter

IDK WHY THIS ONE IS SO FUNNY. 😂 🤣

I’m praying for Kulture to be as confident in her right to know everything as we imagine young Cardi to be.

In case you had a hard time visualizing it the first time: History Buff Cardi.

CREDIT: @YoungCardiB / Twitter

Baby Cardi B was so ahead of her time, you guys. Screw Superman Pose*, I’m going for a Young Cardi Pose before any interaction with a human.

*Studies show that if you put your hands on your hips and boast your chest out and look up (Super Man), you’re more likely to perform higher on tests, before speeches, etc. It’s a confidence pose, and Cardi has it on lock.

Then there are the meme mashups…

CREDIT: @CashFlow_The1 / Twitter

A viral video of a little girl throwing her dad a comeback, “Want to see my stupid face?” has become an internet meme in it’s own right. But Young Cardi will always have the last laugh: “Psh, you already have.”

Of course Neymar made it.

CREDIT: @El_CapitanKing / Twitter

Literally, people are using this image just as a response to people. No caption needed. This breaks all meme rules, but we’re not crying about it. 😉

The most relatable meme ever, however, is here.

CREDIT: Untitled. Digital Image. Latina. 20 July 2018.

You know how you used to invite your non-Latino friends over after school when you knew you might be in trouble because your mom wouldn’t beat you in front of them. Cousins are family, so they don’t count, which means that if the playing were to go on, “that ain’t even hurt.” 😅😂

“My mom says if you don’t bring me, you’re not going.”

CREDIT: Untitled. Digital Image. Latina. 20 July 2018.

This is how our mother’s trained us to be just like them. The most believeable meme of them all: yes, your mama said that, and yes, Cardi B., we know you did, too.

She has some s a v a g e burns.

CREDIT: @ProjectMonz / Twitter

We love/hate kids for their brutal honesty. Thanks, Young Cardi, thanks a lot.

I’m cringing.

CREDIT: @xotokyoo / Twitter

Look into her eyes and tell me you can’t see her saying just that. 👀

And don’t even play like you didn’t say the same thing to 8 of your friends growing up.

Corn Chip Cardi is everything.

CREDIT: @melinacnza / Twitter

Do you ever wonder if our moms just used us to speak their confrontational thoughts so that they can keep being polite? Yeah, it doesn’t ring true to me either. Nobody gave a f*ck.

Some of the memes are trying to bring people closer to the Lord.

@melinacnza / TwitterYou guyyysss…. Saturday night sleepovers were only allowed with your Catholic friends, because the Lord knows everything, and sees everything.

Body Shamer Young Cardi

CREDIT: @jadevanllc / Twitter

I can see why adult Cardi started to have a problem with these memes. Although it’s very likely that at some point in the 90’s, a young Cardi might have said that.

PoPo Young Cardi.

CREDIT: @FidelMartinez_1 / Twitter

She’s very attached to her chancletas and wants me to make sure that you don’t take a single one.

“My mamá says why can’t she and my aunts see what you post publicly on Facebook?”

CREDIT: @CashFlow_The1 / Twitter

Ummm… it must be a Facebook error or something. 🤷🏾‍♀️ Of course, I want your family to know todo que me hace. 🙄

Walmart Thief Young Cardi.

CREDIT: @YoungCardiB / Twitter

Someone legit started a new Twitter handle called @YoungCardiB. 👌

Honestly, Cardi B. would excel in any career she chose to go down.

 Feminist Young Cardi

CREDIT: Untitled. Digital Image. Latina. 20 July 2018.

Translation: “When you write him and he leaves you on sight. NAH, YOU DIDN’T HURT ME.”

And a diss to Nicki Minaj.

CREDIT: Untitled. Digital Image. Latina. 20 July 2018.

Translation: “My mom says you can’t listen to Nicki Minaj because she curses so much.”

Everyone thinks that Cardi and Nicki have beef, but it’s all #fakenews. This is just the most ironic meme yet.


QUIZ: Can You Ace Just The First Verse Of Cardi B’s ‘I Like It’ Hit?

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Shakira Is Famously Colombian-Lebanese And Her ‘Tongue Moment’ Meant A Lot For Middle Eastern Representation

Entertainment

Shakira Is Famously Colombian-Lebanese And Her ‘Tongue Moment’ Meant A Lot For Middle Eastern Representation

Last night Shakira and Jennifer Lopez gave us one of the most iconic halftime show performances we’ve seen in a long time. Not only did they become the first Latinas to headline a Superbowl show, they also brought out the whole Latino Gang —Puerto Rican trap super star Bad Bunny, Colombian reggaeton king J Balvin, and J.Lo’s own little girl, Emme. The show was filled with subtle cultural statements —and one of them became a viral moment. Here’s what Shakira’s tongue flicking gesture actually means. 

Sunday night’s half time show was nothing short of iconic. 

Shakira and JLo performed their biggest hits, including “Waka Waka,” “Let’s get Loud,” and a few others. They brought Bad Bunny on stage to perform Cardi B’s “I Like It,” and his own hit “Callaita,” anchored by Shak. J Balvin also joined in on the spectacle with his massive hit “Mi Gente.”

The Grammy Award-winner was just launching into her hit song “Hips Don’t Lie” when the viral moment happened. 

Shakira leaned down toward one of the cameras at Hard Rock Stadium in Miami Gardens, Fl, stuck out her tongue and let out a high-pitched, warbling cry that instantly set the internet in flames. 

Viewers were quick to ridicule the singer, and the memes started rolling out. 

Countless memes likened her to a turkey, a petulant toddler and characters from Nickelodeon’s “SpongeBob SquarePants”, among a host of other unflattering comparisons. But a few of Shakira’s true fans pointed out the obvious; the sound was a nod to her Lebanese heritage. 

If you’ve followed Shakira’s career since the late 90s you might remember that the artist is inspired by her Middle Eastern roots.

Born Shakira Isabel Mebarak Ripoll, to a Colombian mother and Lebanese father, the singer has drawn on her diverse cultural heritage to create her signature style —both vocally and stylistically. I mean come on, it’s her Lebanese background what inspired her belly-dancing and hip-swaying moves —duh.  

Shakira’s widely celebrated performance was full of nods to her Colombian and Lebanese heritage.

The seemingly random gesture actually carried deep cultural significance. To those familiar with Middle Eastern culture, the sound was akin to a traditional Arabic expression of joy and celebration called a zaghrouta. It was also interpreted as a reference to the world-famous Carnaval de Barranquilla, which is held in Shakira’s hometown in Colombia.

In the beginning of the 2000s Rolling Stone magazine wrote about what made Shakira stand out

“The stylistic breadth of Shakira’s music – elements of folk, Middle Eastern and traditional Latin styles over a foundation of rock and pop – gave her a degree of credibility the American teen queens lacked.” Shakira’s breakout single, which many Latinx millennials might remember from the 90s, was ‘Ojos Así’, a song heavily inspired by the middle eastern world —The Colombian even sings in Arabic. 

Her Latin sound has always been spiced with Middle Eastern elements and Colombia’s African heritage.

The salsa beats in her 2006 megahit “Hips Don’t Lie” are reggaeton-inspired, and it also has an Afrocolombian element to it. The singer she still featured a belly dancing arab-esque number in the video. The same mixture of cultures has been fed into countless of the artists biggest hits, like ‘Tortura,’ ‘Yo soy Gitana,’ ‘Whenever Wherever’, and the list goes on. Her own vocal style was also born from this melting-pot of cultures. Shakira has noted the importance of her sense of “mixed ethnicity,” saying “I am a fusion. That’s my persona. I’m a fusion between black and white, between pop and rock, between cultures – between my Lebanese father and my mother’s Spanish blood, the Colombian folklore and Arab dance…”

Shakira’s music stems from years of listening to Anglo and U.S. rock acts like Led Zeppelin, The Cure, The Beatles and Nirvana.

“I was so in love with that rock sound,” Shakira explained to BMI in 2002, “but at the same time because my father is of 100 percent Lebanese descent, I am devoted to Arabic tastes and sounds. Somehow, I’m a fusion of all of those passions and my music is a fusion of elements that I can make coexist in the same place, in one song.”

Fans praised her for including such a wide array of elements in the halftime performance. 

One person wrote, “In the melting pot that is Miami, you could not have picked a better Super Bowl act and this was a lovely touch.” Another fan tweeted: “Shakira sung in Arabic, Spanish, English. She played the guitar and the drums. She danced champeta, pop, salsa, reggaeton, son de negro, mapalé and arab dance.” The twitter user added, “And her 2-year-old songs are top 10 on USA iTunes. SHAKIRA, SHAKIRA.” 

Shakira has long been an icon for Middle Eastern Americans, especially the ones with Latinx backgrounds too.

“Shakira was all we had for the longest time,” one person tweeted. “Every Middle Eastern American, especially Lebanese, pointed to Shakira as the one entertainer with massive global appeal and popularity. To have our culture and our rhythms represented up there, even in the smallest way, is massive.”

Beyond the spectacle of glittery costumes, laser lights and high-energy dancing, the show was an impactful 15-minute-long homage to the singers’ roots. 

Shakira peppered her performance with Middle Eastern music and belly dancing while also incorporating elements of Latin American culture and traditional Afro Colombian and Latino dances. Jennifer Lopez, born in the Bronx to Puerto Rican parents, sang her chart-topping anthem “Jenny From the Block” and later wore the U.S. territory’s flag as a reversible cape featuring the flag of Puerto Rico on the other face of it.

The show was filled with significant, yet subtle, cultural and political statements. 

While performing a remix of “Waka Waka (This Time For Africa)” and “Let’s Get Loud,” many young singers appeared on stage in circular cages—a subtle reference, but a possible nod to the thousands of children, most from Latin American countries, who have been detained at the border due to the migratory crisis and current administration’s family separation policy. The Puerto Rican flag flashed as the iconic Springsteen ‘Born In The USA’ song played, as if to remind viewers that Puerto Ricans are American citizens.

Lopez and Shakira’s performance was primarily a celebration of Latin American music and their own lengthy careers, but the subtle references to politics might serve as a guide for what the NFL will be like in the Jay Z era.

Here’s What My White Husband Has Learned About The Latino Culture One Day At A Time

relationships

Here’s What My White Husband Has Learned About The Latino Culture One Day At A Time

My husband and I have been married for a little over three years now and he is still learning so much about myself and what it means to be Latino. I’m not talking about me having a big Cuban family all stationed in Miami (3-0-5 🙌🏽) or the fact that the best jokes in Netflix’s “One Day At A Time” are in Spanish. I’m talking about the little things that to me have always been a normal part of life. This is what has continuously caught him off guard…

If you ask him, I’m already turning into my abuela because of the things he is finding out, which to me is a compliment. Here are just a few of the things that he is starting to understand about our future together.

1. Seasoning your beans is hard AF but abuela makes it look easy.

gifnik.com

No matter how many times I try or how many techniques I use, my bean always turn out bland AF. This wouldn’t have been a problem if he didn’t have my abuela’s frijoles negro because now he has a reference point as to what beans are supposed to taste like. Though, he doesn’t cook so my bland beans will have to do.

2. That whole personal space thing is a white construct.

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I missed my hot mess buddy!

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One of the first things he realized about being married to a Latino is that all that personal space he once had is gone. I even go into the bathroom to talk to him when he’s in the shower because that’s 👏🏾 how 👏🏾 I 👏🏾 was 👏🏾 raised. 👏🏾

3. Family obligations cannot and will not be avoided.

Even if it means that you have to spend $800 to travel 3,000 miles back home for a weekend for your nephew’s first birthday, there is no getting out of family events. #BasedOnTrueEvents

4. My family raised me to be super eco-friendly (and very frugal).

The first time my husband saw me washing a Ziploc bag he asked if we had run out and that he could get some from the store. My response: “But, like, why do you want to waste money like that?”

5. Selena was and will always be La Reina.

anything-for-selenaaas / Tumblr

I know. I know. How did he not know this before is what you’re thinking, right? But you can’t hold it against him. I don’t think Selena had a very big following in West Virginia. There was no way he could have known that she is more relevant now than ever. Not to mention that she still wins Latin Billboard awards and I play her music nonstop.

6. My abuela’s obsession with reusing containers has been passed down.

After he came down from the initial shock of thinking that I left the sour cream in the Tupperware cabinet overnight, he made a joke about me becoming my abuela. I’ve never been so proud.

7. Calling a loved one “gordo” is not offensive.

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@f_uanteik #migordo #iloveyou #happiness #happynights

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Because, you know, someone calling you “my little fatty” is not okay. Imagine his shock when he heard a family member call me “gordito” in front of him. He was shook.

8. Every chore I do is just an excuse to put on Celia Cruz and dance.

mitú

Sure, I can cook in silence but nothing makes my time in the kitchen more enjoyable than some “La Negra Tiene Tumbao” or “La Vida Es Un Carnaval” blaring in the background. Plus, he is starting to learn some of her greatest hits.

9. Seventy-five percent of Latino cooking is just making that sabor.

To quote my husband: “Oh. So ropa vieja is like making pot roast then you make the flavor (sofrito). Yeah. White people are too lazy to make all that flavor.”

10. Being extra and loud is just in our blood.

I still have that trophy on our desk in the living room and he has mentioned moving it a couple times. Then I stubbed my toe, fall to the floor in tears, and he remembers why it is so prominently displayed.

11. Hot Cheetos are life.

He didn’t know they were so versatile but he’s not upset that we get to eat them all the time.


READ: 14 Things That Happen When A Gringo Marries Into A Latino Family

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