Entertainment

Honor #WomensHistoryMonth With These Latina Rapper Bangers

This year was the very first time a female rapper won a Grammy Award for Best Rap Album without any men involved, and that rapper was Dominican-American Cardi B. Latinas have been paving the way for new genres, new music perspectives and new ways to lift other women up in this world.

You need a new power workout, #MotivationMonday playlist to remind you who you’re really made of? These Latina rappers dropped their strength and resilience into every verse. Dale, mamita. She se puede.

“Get Up 10” by Cardi B

Cardi B / YouTube

The very first song on her Grammy-winning album “Invasion of Privacy” is a hype song like no other, telling the story of how Cardi “used to dance in a club right across from [her] school.” How’d she make it?

“Look myself in the mirror, I say we gon’ win, knock me down nine times but I get up ten.”

“Brujas” by Princess Nokia

This Afro-Boricua Bruja is only going to spit verses that advance the feminist and queer agenda. Need to put off that step off energy? Remember the Santería that’s in your blood:

“Don’t you fuck with my energy. Casting spells with my cousins, I’m the head of this coven… I’m a bruja, I’m a bruja, and I’ma dress in all white.”

“Sola” by Becky G

@iambeckyg / Instagram

Becky G is giving us all the bilingual loving and we’re here for it. When you’re feeling lonely in that single life, might we recommend this 2016 throwback.

“Mejor me quedo sola, ah
Y me voy pa’ la calle, eh
Voy a vivir mi vida loca, ah
Sin nadie que me falle, eh”

“Waste of Time” by Snow Tha Product

@snowthaproduct / Instagram

Mexican rapper Snow Tha Product is too good for this world. An ex-lover treated you with disrespect? Don’t forget you’re better than that.

“That ever since we started talking you been on your jealousy
But in the meanwhile you been talking to Penelope and Heather and Alicia and Stephanie And Melanie
And phone looking like a Petey Pablo song, offending me
And now I’m like
Getting attached
I’m gonna go
I’ll be alright
I’m better alone”

“El Tigeraso” by Maluca Mala

@malucamala / Instagram

New York-born Dominican Maluca Mala grew up with a DJ for a father, and her music is influenced by everything and everything. Her most famous song right now is a tribute against street harassment. Play it on blast and dance your way down that block.

“Papi usted me oye ay no no tengo numero usted esta loco
Ay por dios mira esa baina mira esa baina
Oh no no no no no no no me mata el novio”

“Icey” by Melii

@melii / Instagram

I don’t care what 20-year-old Dominicana Melii named this song; it is FIRE. So fire that Rihanna actually gave her a shout out during a Fenty Beauty product review on Instagram. Now, she’s been signed, ayy.

“Come get your n****, he tryna mack it to me like he tryna do me
Fiendin’ for the cootie, rubbin’ on the booty
Tú no eres na’, tú no haces na’
Karma got you mad, bitch you doin’ bad (you mad?)

Tú me tienes tema
Cuida’o, si me tocas, te quemas, ah”

“La Diaspora” by Nitty Scott

Spotify

Nitty Scott is another free-styling Reina to watch out for and she’s here to keep the Caribbean spirit alive in every verse.

Freed all my people, from here to Montego
Dale morena, like this Puerto Rico
We go, when we make it rain like El Nino
Got that sofrito, that primo, that n****
None of the hitters is fucking with me though
We so cool, we ride off in El Camino
We gon’ be seen, yo, no need no Nat Geo
Got so much juice, they just call me Tampico”

“Celoso” by Le Le Pons

@lelepons / Instagram

You might recognize Eleonora “Lele” Pons as the most followed and most looped Viner before the platform shut down. She creates comedy sketches, is writing novels, and making some real good bangers.

“Te pones celoso si me ves con otro
Hago lo que quiero, yo solo me la gozo
Te pones celoso si bailo con otro
Yo no soy de ellos, ni tuya tampoco”

“Mujer Bruja” by Mala “La Mala” Rodriguez

@malarodriguez / Instagram

We can’t have enough songs about brujería can we? Latin Grammy Award-winning La Mala performs in a range of genres, and she does it well.

“No, no soy romántica
Lo que busco es la práctica (Lalalala)
A todos les gusta ir hablando de mí
A veces les oigo decir (Wuh)

Mujer bruja
El riesgo es lo que te asusta
Pero eso es lo que me gusta
Yo no sé portarme bien, nada bien”

“1977” by Ana Tijoux

@anatijoux / Instagram

Tiijoux is the daughter of Chilean liberals who were jailed and put on a plane to France, where Tijoux was later born, in 1977. There’s something so raw about this song, that it’ll make everyone feel a different way. Que te piensas?

“Naci un dia de junio
Del año 77
Planeta mercurio
Y el año de la serpiente
Sin o patente
Tatuado y en mi frente
Que en el vientre de mi madre
Marcaba el paso siguiente”

“Take You Home” by Angie Martinez

@AngieMartinez / Instagram

You probably don’t know who Angie Martinez is, but she was one of the first Latina rappers in the game back in the ’90s. This Nuyorican used to work with Jay-Z, Snoop Dogg, Mary K. Blige and more. Listen for nostalgic, pioneer feels.

“Pull up in the truck and it ain’t my man’s
You screaming “hey yo”, you don’t got a chance
Son, you are speaking a language I don’t understand
Know the dude I hang with, I don’t hold his hand
Cause, me, I’m free to choose 
It’s possible to leave with you”

“Loca” by Khea (feat. Cazzu)

@cazzu / Instagram

Twenty-five-year-old Argentine trapera, Cazzu, has been headlining Latin America for the last two years. We’ve all heard this song and there’s no question Cazzu’s range makes it:

Me dice loca
Se enloquece si sólo mira y no me toca
Que me pasa a buscar, que no puede aguantar, que lo voy a matar
Que lo ate a la cama, lo agarre del cuello y no pueda respirar, -ar”

“Yo Aprendi” by Danay Suárez

@danaysuarez / Instagram

This Havana-born rapper has skyrocketed to rap fame with “Yo Aprendí,” which is a collection of hardships that proves that people are resilient. 

“Yo aprendí que la karma es buena consejera
A la hora de tomar decisiones certeras 
Que yo no soy la maldita
Pero con el oportunista debo ser una fiera”

“Yo No Sé” by DaniLeigh

@iamdanileigh / Instagram

Hooked on a novix but don’t know why? DaniLeigh can relate, and this wildly underrated artist can help you out.

“Tú eras mi Kanye, y yo era tu Kim (Yo era tu Kim)
Pero lo botaste, le diste su fin
Yo me equivoqué cuando yo me enamoré (Yeah)
Me pide perdón, pero ya te olvidé (Yeah, yeah)”

“Cola Song” by INNA

@inna / Instagram

Elena Alexandra Apostoleanu was born in Romania and identifies as Latina. I mean, the Cola Song says it all: “Soy Latina baby, okay, let’s party, say ole. Soy Latina y la noche we own it, baby.”

“Yo Quiero Bailar” by Ivy Queen

@ivyqueendiva / Instagram

This song is puro party vibes and we’re cool with that. Ivy Queen is the latest up and comer we need.

“Porque yo soy la que mando
Soy la que decide cuando vamos al mambo
Y tu lo sabes
El ritmo me esta llevando
Mientras mas te pegas mas te voy azotando y eso
Esta bien”

“Tomboy” by Princess Nokia

Spotify

Yes–Princess Nokia makes this list twice and for good reason. This gender fluid bruja has stolen our hearts. Call it bias or listen to this track.

“That girl is a tomboy!

With my little titties and my phat belly
I could take your man if you finna let me
It’s a guarantee that he won’t forget me
My body little, my soul is heavy”

“Mi Cama” by Karol G

Spotify

If you need a breakup song, Karol G has teamed up with J Balvin to get you real revved up about moving on. Tu eres poderosa, mija.

“En mi cerradura ya no entra tu llave
Esa calentura que otra te la apague
Tú en este vuelo no tienes pasaje
Esta noche hay fiesta pero tú no tienes traje (no)
No te preocupes, tu tren ya pasó
Eso te pasa por andar con dos
La matemática a ti te falló
Y te lo dije yo

Mi cama suena y suena
Mi cama suena y suena”

“Girls Talk” by Sammi Sanchez

Spotify

Sammi Sanchez’ Latin remix of her single “Girls Talk” actually far exceeded the success of her original? Why? Because comadres talk more.

“Girls talk, and you been you been caught
tell me what you know about that
yeah you hot – but you lost – and I’m gone
and now you’re never getting me back

Debes estar loco
no te voy a perdonar
vete que a ti te atrapan
te juro que no pienso regresar”

“Pussy Control” by Zuzuka Poderosa

@ZuzukaPoderosa / Instagram

Brazilian badass Zuzuka Poderosa has always viewed her rap and dance as a form of social justice. She told Cosmopolitan that she wants her music to make you think about racism and colonialism–and make you shake that.

READ: 24 Indigenous Rights Fighters From Latin America To Keep In Mind While You Celebrate Women’s History Month

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Kali Uchis’ “Telepatía” is Becoming a Global Hit Thanks to TikTok

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Kali Uchis’ “Telepatía” is Becoming a Global Hit Thanks to TikTok

Through the power of TikTok, Kali Uchis is taking her song “Telepatía” to the top. The Colombian-American singer is sitting comfortably in the top 10 of Spotify’s Top 200 chart in the U.S. thanks to a TikTok trend.

This isn’t the first time that TikTok brought new fame to songs.

TikTok has proven to be quite the catalyst for today’s top hits. The app assisted in getting Olivia Rodrigo’s “drivers license” to the top of Billboard Hot 100 chart, where it remains. TikTok also reinvigorated interest in Fleetwood Mac’s “Dreams” last year thanks to Doggface’s viral video. Now Uchis is getting her long overdue shine with “Telepatía.”

“Telepatía” is becoming a global hit thanks to the same phenomenon.

At No. 7 on the Spotify U.S. chart, “Telepatía” is the highest-charting Latin song in the country. Bad Bunny’s “Dákiti” with Jhay Cortez is the next closest Latin song at No. 14. “Telepatía” is also making waves across the globe where the song is charting on Spotify’s Viral Charts in 66 countries and in the Top Songs Charts of 32 countries.

There’s also plenty of “Telepatía” memes.

Uchis is turning the viral song’s success into strong sales and streaming. On this week’s Billboard Hot Latin Songs chart, “Telepatía” debuts at No. 10, marking her first top 10 hit on the chart. There are also memes circulating on other social media apps that are contributing to the song’s virality.

“Telepatía” is one of the key cuts on Uchis’ debut Latin album, Sin Miedo (del Amor y Otros Demonios). It’s the best example of her translating that alternative soul music that she’s known for into Spanish. The song is notably in Spanglish as Uchis sings about keeping a love connection alive from a distance. It’s timely considering this era of social distancing that we’re in during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Uchis is currently nominated for a Grammy Award. She’s up for Best Dance Recording for her feature on Kaytranada’s “10%” song.

Read: You Have To Hear Kali Uchis Slay This Classic Latino Song

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Cardi B and Mariah Carey Teamed Up to Talk About Confidence, Insecurity, and Prejudice in the Music Industry

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Cardi B and Mariah Carey Teamed Up to Talk About Confidence, Insecurity, and Prejudice in the Music Industry

Photos via Getty Images

At first glance, you may not think Cardi B and Mariah Carey have much in common. But the two chart-topping divas might actually be more similar than they are different.

Cardi B once called herself the “strip-club Mariah Carey”, so Interview magazine recruited the Afro-Venezuelan songstress herself to interview Belcalis.

In a new conversation in Interview magazine, Cardi B and Mariah Carey teamed up to talk about the challenges they’ve had to face as famous women of color coming from tough backgrounds.

And in case you thought otherwise, Mariah Carey was not throwing any softballs. The conversation was intense. The women covered everything from confidence, to body image, to prejudice in the music industry. It didn’t seem like either of the women held back.

Mimi opened the interview by asking Cardi if she ever felt beautiful as a child. Surprisingly, Cardi responded opened up about a topic that society doesn’t take about very often: anti-Blackness in the Latino community.

“I’m Trini and I’m Dominican, there’s a lot of Dominicans that look a certain type of way [in the Bronx]. They have soft, pretty, curly hair. Growing up, guys would ask me weird questions like, ‘If you’re Dominican, why is your hair so nappy?'”

Cardi went on to admit that she bleached and permed her hair when she was young to the point where she damaged her hair. But she soon learned to take care of her natural hair and appreciate it for what it was.

Cardi’s confession about her hair prompted Mariah to reveal her own vulnerable story. “It was a very traumatizing thing for me having a black father and a white mother, because my mother, who raised me, didn’t really know about textured hair,” Mariah said.

The superstar duo also touched on the sensitive topics of racism and prejudice in the music and fashion industries.

In fact, MC point-blank asked Cardi B: “Do you feel that the record industry or the fashion industry, from your perspective, is inherently racist?”. Cardi explained that she wouldn’t technically use the word racist, but has “felt prejudice.”

“I have been involved in endorsement deals, and then I found out that certain white people got more money for their deals from the same company,” she said. “So it’s like, ‘When you’re not paying me what you’re paying these other people, why is that?’ It’s kind of insulting.”

Cardi also added that Black artists have a tougher time getting dressed by designers and getting seats at fashion shows, even though hip-hop culture influences fashion in so many ways.

Cardi B and Mariah Carey then bonded over the fact that both of them could only be themselves throughout their careers in the public eye.

Mariah applauded the fact that the public doesn’t require celebrities to have a squeaky-clean image anymore. “I do think people are much more accepting now,” she said. “…I do feel like people are, at least in some circles, allowed to be themselves and express themselves more than they were back in the day.”

“People expected me to be something specific, but I can only be me,” she added. “We’re similar in that way.”

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