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Honor #WomensHistoryMonth With These Latina Rapper Bangers

Princess Nokia | Getty Images

This year was the very first time a female rapper won a Grammy Award for Best Rap Album without any men involved, and that rapper was Dominican-American Cardi B. Latinas have been paving the way for new genres, new music perspectives and new ways to lift other women up in this world.

You need a new power workout, #MotivationMonday playlist to remind you who you’re really made of? These Latina rappers dropped their strength and resilience into every verse. Dale, mamita. She se puede.

“Get Up 10” by Cardi B

CREDIT: Cardi B / YouTube

The very first song on her Grammy-winning album “Invasion of Privacy” is a hype song like no other, telling the story of how Cardi “used to dance in a club right across from [her] school.” How’d she make it?

“Look myself in the mirror, I say we gon’ win, knock me down nine times but I get up ten.”

“Brujas” by Princess Nokia

This Afro-Boricua Bruja is only going to spit verses that advance the feminist and queer agenda. Need to put off that step off energy? Remember the Santería that’s in your blood:

“Don’t you fuck with my energy. Casting spells with my cousins, I’m the head of this coven… I’m a bruja, I’m a bruja, and I’ma dress in all white.”

“Sola” by Becky G

CREDIT: @iambeckyg / Instagram

Becky G is giving us all the bilingual loving and we’re here for it. When you’re feeling lonely in that single life, might we recommend this 2016 throwback.

“Mejor me quedo sola, ah
Y me voy pa’ la calle, eh
Voy a vivir mi vida loca, ah
Sin nadie que me falle, eh”

“Waste of Time” by Snow Tha Product

CREDIT: @snowthaproduct / Instagram

Mexican rapper Snow Tha Product is too good for this world. An ex-lover treated you with disrespect? Don’t forget you’re better than that.

“That ever since we started talking you been on your jealousy
But in the meanwhile you been talking to Penelope and Heather and Alicia and Stephanie And Melanie
And phone looking like a Petey Pablo song, offending me
And now I’m like
Getting attached
I’m gonna go
I’ll be alright
I’m better alone”

“El Tigeraso” by Maluca Mala

CREDIT: @malucamala / Instagram

New York-born Dominican Maluca Mala grew up with a DJ for a father, and her music is influenced by everything and everything. Her most famous song right now is a tribute against street harassment. Play it on blast and dance your way down that block.

“Papi usted me oye ay no no tengo numero usted esta loco
Ay por dios mira esa baina mira esa baina
Oh no no no no no no no me mata el novio”

“Icey” by Melii

CREDIT: @melii / Instagram

I don’t care what 20-year-old Dominicana Melii named this song; it is FIRE. So fire that Rihanna actually gave her a shout out during a Fenty Beauty product review on Instagram. Now, she’s been signed, ayy.

“Come get your n****, he tryna mack it to me like he tryna do me
Fiendin’ for the cootie, rubbin’ on the booty
Tú no eres na’, tú no haces na’
Karma got you mad, bitch you doin’ bad (you mad?)

Tú me tienes tema
Cuida’o, si me tocas, te quemas, ah”

“La Diaspora” by Nitty Scott

CREDIT: Spotify

Nitty Scott is another free-styling Reina to watch out for and she’s here to keep the Caribbean spirit alive in every verse.

Freed all my people, from here to Montego
Dale morena, like this Puerto Rico
We go, when we make it rain like El Nino
Got that sofrito, that primo, that n****
None of the hitters is fucking with me though
We so cool, we ride off in El Camino
We gon’ be seen, yo, no need no Nat Geo
Got so much juice, they just call me Tampico”

“Celoso” by Le Le Pons

CREDIT: @lelepons / Instagram

You might recognize Eleonora “Lele” Pons as the most followed and most looped Viner before the platform shut down. She creates comedy sketches, is writing novels, and making some real good bangers.

“Te pones celoso si me ves con otro
Hago lo que quiero, yo solo me la gozo
Te pones celoso si bailo con otro
Yo no soy de ellos, ni tuya tampoco”

“Mujer Bruja” by Mala “La Mala” Rodriguez

CREDIT: @malarodriguez / Instagram

We can’t have enough songs about brujería can we? Latin Grammy Award-winning La Mala performs in a range of genres, and she does it well.

“No, no soy romántica
Lo que busco es la práctica (Lalalala)
A todos les gusta ir hablando de mí
A veces les oigo decir (Wuh)

Mujer bruja
El riesgo es lo que te asusta
Pero eso es lo que me gusta
Yo no sé portarme bien, nada bien”

“1977” by Ana Tijoux

CREDIT: @anatijoux / Instagram

Tiijoux is the daughter of Chilean liberals who were jailed and put on a plane to France, where Tijoux was later born, in 1977. There’s something so raw about this song, that it’ll make everyone feel a different way. Que te piensas?

“Naci un dia de junio
Del año 77
Planeta mercurio
Y el año de la serpiente
Sin o patente
Tatuado y en mi frente
Que en el vientre de mi madre
Marcaba el paso siguiente”

“Take You Home” by Angie Martinez

CREDIT: @AngieMartinez / Instagram

You probably don’t know who Angie Martinez is, but she was one of the first Latina rappers in the game back in the ’90s. This Nuyorican used to work with Jay-Z, Snoop Dogg, Mary K. Blige and more. Listen for nostalgic, pioneer feels.

“Pull up in the truck and it ain’t my man’s
You screaming “hey yo”, you don’t got a chance
Son, you are speaking a language I don’t understand
Know the dude I hang with, I don’t hold his hand
Cause, me, I’m free to choose 
It’s possible to leave with you”

“Loca” by Khea (feat. Cazzu)

CREDIT: @cazzu / Instagram

Twenty-five-year-old Argentine trapera, Cazzu, has been headlining Latin America for the last two years. We’ve all heard this song and there’s no question Cazzu’s range makes it:

Me dice loca
Se enloquece si sólo mira y no me toca
Que me pasa a buscar, que no puede aguantar, que lo voy a matar
Que lo ate a la cama, lo agarre del cuello y no pueda respirar, -ar”

“Yo Aprendi” by Danay Suárez

CREDIT: @danaysuarez / Instagram

This Havana-born rapper has skyrocketed to rap fame with “Yo Aprendí,” which is a collection of hardships that proves that people are resilient. 

“Yo aprendí que la karma es buena consejera
A la hora de tomar decisiones certeras 
Que yo no soy la maldita
Pero con el oportunista debo ser una fiera”

“Yo No Sé” by DaniLeigh

CREDIT: @iamdanileigh / Instagram

Hooked on a novix but don’t know why? DaniLeigh can relate, and this wildly underrated artist can help you out.

“Tú eras mi Kanye, y yo era tu Kim (Yo era tu Kim)
Pero lo botaste, le diste su fin
Yo me equivoqué cuando yo me enamoré (Yeah)
Me pide perdón, pero ya te olvidé (Yeah, yeah)”

“Cola Song” by INNA

CREDIT: @inna / Instagram

Elena Alexandra Apostoleanu was born in Romania and identifies as Latina. I mean, the Cola Song says it all: “Soy Latina baby, okay, let’s party, say ole. Soy Latina y la noche we own it, baby.”

“Yo Quiero Bailar” by Ivy Queen

CREDIT: @ivyqueendiva / Instagram

This song is puro party vibes and we’re cool with that. Ivy Queen is the latest up and comer we need.

“Porque yo soy la que mando
Soy la que decide cuando vamos al mambo
Y tu lo sabes
El ritmo me esta llevando
Mientras mas te pegas mas te voy azotando y eso
Esta bien”

“Tomboy” by Princess Nokia

CREDIT: Spotify

Yes–Princess Nokia makes this list twice and for good reason. This gender fluid bruja has stolen our hearts. Call it bias or listen to this track.

“That girl is a tomboy!

With my little titties and my phat belly
I could take your man if you finna let me
It’s a guarantee that he won’t forget me
My body little, my soul is heavy”

“Mi Cama” by Karol G

CREDIT: Spotify

If you need a breakup song, Karol G has teamed up with J Balvin to get you real revved up about moving on. Tu eres poderosa, mija.

“En mi cerradura ya no entra tu llave
Esa calentura que otra te la apague
Tú en este vuelo no tienes pasaje
Esta noche hay fiesta pero tú no tienes traje (no)
No te preocupes, tu tren ya pasó
Eso te pasa por andar con dos
La matemática a ti te falló
Y te lo dije yo

Mi cama suena y suena
Mi cama suena y suena”

“Girls Talk” by Sammi Sanchez

CREDIT: Spotify

Sammi Sanchez’ Latin remix of her single “Girls Talk” actually far exceeded the success of her original? Why? Because comadres talk more.

“Girls talk, and you been you been caught
tell me what you know about that
yeah you hot – but you lost – and I’m gone
and now you’re never getting me back

Debes estar loco
no te voy a perdonar
vete que a ti te atrapan
te juro que no pienso regresar”

“Pussy Control” by Zuzuka Poderosa

CREDIT: @ZuzukaPoderosa / Instagram

Brazilian badass Zuzuka Poderosa has always viewed her rap and dance as a form of social justice. She told Cosmopolitan that she wants her music to make you think about racism and colonialism–and make you shake that.

READ: 24 Indigenous Rights Fighters From Latin America To Keep In Mind While You Celebrate Women’s History Month

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WOC Could NEVER Get Away With What Elizabeth Holmes Did Even Though Latino Businesses Contribute $700 Billion To The Economy

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WOC Could NEVER Get Away With What Elizabeth Holmes Did Even Though Latino Businesses Contribute $700 Billion To The Economy

HBO

If you don’t know the story of Elizabeth Holmes by now HBO’s latest documentary “The Inventor: Out for Blood In Silicon Valley” will get you somewhere on the scale of understanding. The film, which debuted Monday night, works to debunk all that we know to be true about Holmes. First, that she is con-artist who convinced rich older men to invest in a falsehood while armed with a black turtleneck. And second, that in doing so destroyed peoples’ lives.

The Alex Gibney directed documentary softly focuses its lens on the Stanford dropout and disgraced Silicon Valley who sold investors on an impossible idea.

While Gibney’s documentary is sympathetic to Holmes, we must remember the facts about Holmes and her company Theranos as we know them. The facts: she captivated the world and big-time business investors ( Rupert Murdoch and Betsy Devos among them) when she promised the world’s most revolutionary invention: an at-home toolkit that, with just a prick of a finger and a single drop of blood, could run up to 200 diagnostic health tests.

More facts: Holmes would never have been able to pull off such a ruse if she’d been a Latina.

The most appalling aspect of Holmes’ story is also what the documentary fails to address. The blind faith in her company would never have been lent to one of the 4.4 million Latino-owned small business in the U.S.

I am obsessed with the fact that she was able to walk up to anyone, ask for a 100 million dollars and it was given to…

Posted by Patty Rodriguez on Sunday, March 17, 2019

Older, established white men (and Betsy Devos) placed all their faith and finances in Holmes’ idea only find years later that they had invested in a company built on sand. Up until Theranos’s rise, Holmes was a Stanford drop out, her great grandfather was an entrepreneur and her uncle was a doctor. In the film, Theranos chairman Don Lucas explains that he was certain that Holmes, at the time a 22-year-old college dropout, “came by it naturally” because of the accomplishments of the men in her family.

Because nowhere in 2019 Trump- run USA would a Latino get away wit this caca.

@AgeofIrony / Twitter

So for real. Lock her up.

@tiaremeliza / Instagram

Check out the trailer for this woman below.




Male-dominated, underrepresentation and privilege are just some words to describe the tech industry. Less than 20 percent of women make up the tech space, and that number drops even lower when it comes to women of color. But these stats haven’t discouraged Latinas from leaving their mark in the tech world.

Here, 7 Latinas killing it in the tech industry.

1. Gretel Perera

(Courtesy of Gretel Perera)

For Venezuelan-born Gretel Perera, the most exciting part of technology is storytelling.

The PR professional has been specializing in tech companies for the past decade, working for brands like HomeAway, Evernote and Dell. In 2014, she and friend Rocio Medina felt there wasn’t a community for Latinas in the industry and together founded Latinas in Tech, a nonprofit organization with the mission to connect, support and empower Latina women working in the field.

Their org, which Perera calls a “full-time passion,” started out as a couple Latinas in the tech space meeting up at bars to discuss the challenges they faced at work. Fast-forward to today, they host meetups inside tech companies like Google and Lyft.

“Our community has more than 2 thousand women working in tech, from more than 15 countries. In all the major companies, we have a presence. Women who are entrepreneurs, investors, marketing professionals, engineers, cybersecurity experts, etc,’” Perera told FIERCE.

There are challenges Latinas face when culturally adapting to an environment as dynamic as Silicon Valley. To start: It’s fast-paced and male-dominated, but Latinas in Tech offers meetups and various panels in the U.S. and Mexico that educate women on how to use their culture as a strategic tool for their careers.

“You have a different perspective you can bring to a company,” she said. “We want Latinas to learn how to package it and market themselves differently compared to someone who doesn’t have it.”

2. Janel Martinez

(Courtesy of Janel Martinez)

Janel Martinez was born in New York to Honduran parents. Growing up, she was obsessed with all things media. From watching the news after school to catching up on popular shows, she was very aware from an early age of what representation looked like in mainstream media and that she never saw a complete view of her identity in it.

She started her own career in media at a business publication. While interviewing entrepreneurs, she realized they all said something similar: “I created this because I saw there was no solution for it.” She carried these words with her until 2013, when she launched Ain’t I Latina, a digital destination that celebrates and highlights Afro-Latinas.

Her advice for young Latinas looking to get into the tech space? Go for it! With Latinas only making up a small percentage of the tech industry, Martinez understands why discouraged women of color might ask, “Why would I go for it if my chances are lower than my white counterparts?” But she doesn’t want them to be brought down by the numbers.

“There’s going to be times you’re the only Latina in the room, but don’t let that hold you back because you definitely are deserving and worthy to be in that space if you want it,” she told us.

3. Nathalie Molina Niño

(Courtesy of Nathalie Molina Niño)

Nathalie Molina Niño started her first startup when she was 20. Now, nearly two decades later, she is the CEO and founder of BRAVA Investments, which targets high-growth, scalable businesses that deliver a measurable economic benefit to women.

That’s not all. Molina Niño also founded the Center for Women Entrepreneurs at Barnard College of Columbia University, where she teaches; works on a TV show about women of color in STEM, whose pilot has been picked up by Freeform; and has a book, LEAPFROG: The New Revolution for Women Entrepreneurs, that is set to hit bookshelves in August. The book was inspired by the myth, often perpetuated in other startup literature, that people who want to open businesses have wealthy friends and family that can write them checks.

Born to a Colombian mother and an Ecuadorian father, Molina Niño says what she admires most about the Latino community is the spirit we have to be the most entrepreneurial people in this country.

4. Natalia Carrasco

(Courtesy of Natalia Carrasco)

In San Francisco, Bolivian-born Natalia Carrasco is the director of strategy for The Town Kitchen, a community-driven food company that employs and empowers low-income youth by delivering chef-crafted, boxed lunches to corporate clients.

Carrasco has always been fascinated with using business and tech for good. “Technology can be super powerful, and when you apply that power into social good, you can make a very important impact,” Carrasco told us.

No day is ever the same for her at The Town Kitchen, but she is always looking to implement technology tools into her workplace in order to create a more efficient office. She’s currently working on a personal project that will gather local vendors with a social impact. Through it, she hopes to provide a directory for companies and individuals looking to purchase goods and services from a brand that has a positive impact in their community, whether it be vendors that hire formerly incarcerated youth or businesses run by people of color.

5. Elena Buenrostro

(Courtesy of Elena Buenrostro)

From New York to Australia, California-born Elena Buenrostro is building an international community for women who fly drones. This Mexican-American certified drone pilot never imagined she’d be doing this work. With a background in video production, last year, after deciding she would hike the Great Wall of China, she knew she wanted to make a video of it with a fresh perspective. To do so, she bought a drone.

Buenrostro became obsessed with flying her drone and soon realized that there wasn’t a community for women who were drone pilots, so she co-founded Women Who Drone, a digital space for female drone pilots, enthusiasts and aerial content creators.

Together, they strive to educate and inspire women to join the UAV industry by providing everything from workshops to brand ambassador positions in all parts of the world.  

With more than 17 thousand followers on Instagram, the Women Who Drone community continues to expand, bringing in women from all walks of life.

She now teaches people how to fly, and says the most rewarding part is when they tell her they bought a drone because of her.

“It’s a booming industry. It’s going to be worth 127 billion by 2020, and only 4 percent of women are involved in that. Drones are going to be a large part of the future,” she says.

6. Ariel Lopez

(Courtesy of Ariel Lopez)

Born in Florida and raised in North Carolina, Puerto Rican entrepreneur, career coach and public speaker Ariel Lopez is helping to train individuals on the skills they need to find careers in tech and media spaces.

She’s the founder and CEO of 2020Shift, a startup that helps tech and digital media companies diversify their recruitment process and provides leadership and skills-based training.

Lopez came up with 2020Shift in 2014, after seeing the disparity in tech among woman and people of color. Her background is in recruiting and talent acquisition, and by helping many startups hire talent, she was able to get an inside look at what companies want when hiring for tech positions.

“I started it really in the effort to prepare people for these roles and raise awareness on all the different things that you can do in tech regardless of your skillset or your background,” she says. “The misconception is: learn how to code, become an engineer and that’s your golden ticket in. When you can literally do hundreds, if not thousands, of other things within the space.”

What’s next for 2020Shift and Lopez? Knac, a platform that will be launching this summer that will actually let people showcase their skills to employers through small assessments and hiring challenges. Some of the employers participating include Snapchat, Vimeo, MasterCard and more.

7. Soledad Antelada Toledano

(Courtesy of Soledad Antelada Toledano)

Argentine-born Soledad Antelada Toledano works in cybersecurity operations at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab in San Francisco. It’s not an industry that has many women, so in 2014, she started Girls Can Hack, an organization determined to close the gender gap in tech.

Through her org, she offers guidance and empowerment to women looking to enter the cybersecurity world.

“Only 10 percent of people in cybersecurity are women, and the numbers are not going up. It is an extremely hostile field for women,” she says. “Cybersecurity nowadays is the base of the change and advancement in tech. It is changing the world politically and economically, and women are missing out.”

Antelada is also the president of The Women Scientists and Engineers Council at her lab, and she is continuing to work hard to bring diversity and inclusion to the cybersecurity space.


Read: In A White, Male Tech World, These Latinas Are Kicking Ass And Creating Space For Other Women Of Color