Entertainment

If You’re Looking For A Scary Yet Woke Halloween Movie To Watch, This Indie Horror Filmmaker Has You Covered

Halloween is here, and while some are getting ready with their Latino-inspired costumes for a night or trick-or-treating or partying, the homebodies out there might be looking to make it a Blockbuster night. RIP Blockbuster Video.

For you horror fans looking for something a little bit different —  maybe something new, something scary, something that uses the genre in order to creatively delve into social issues and gender roles, then award-winning horror filmmaker Michelle Garza Cervera has you covered.

Michelle Garza Cervera

“Gender issues have been present in horror films since the beginning of cinema. Monsters with specific gender and bodily differences exist in most classic horror films,” says Garza Cervera, a Mexico City-native who makes movies that bring a much-needed Latin American and female perspective to the genre.

“Even though gender was present, it has mostly kept a one-sided perspective since the majority of directors and producers have been male, which causes most of the spectators to also be male,” she adds. “This reality has created stereotypical female characters that are molded by writers and directors that are not interested in understanding the real complexity of femininity and doesn’t allow the female spectators to deeply empathize with the characters.”

However, Garza Cervera and many others are looking to change that. The filmmaker has written and directed short films that have been selected in more than 40 international film festivals, with her short film “Clara’s Rage” winning several awards, including Best National Short at the Campeche Film Festival. She’s currently writing her first feature film thanks to support from the Mexican Institute of Cinematography.

Clara’s Rage / Michelle Garza Cervera

“Fortunately, there are more and more different perspectives inside the horror genre, not only in gender but also in race and culture, which only makes horror films richer and stronger,” she says. “There are great example of horror movies that use the characteristics of its genre to understand it’s characters, their context and cultural background and make a metaphor of the real human conflict that she or he is facing.”

It’s a good thing Garza Cervera comes with some solid spooky and terrifying recommendations. Here’s her list of eight horror films with a socially conscious slant for your Halloween pleasure.

“El Paramo (The Squad)” by Jaime Osorio

A still from “El Paramo.” Credit: Rotten Tomatoes/Rhayuela Cine

“It’s a psychological thriller that talks about the conflict with the guerrilla in Colombia through the story of a squad of soldiers stuck with a woman in a military base in the middle of the mountains,” explains Garza Cervera.

It’s available for free on Vudu and for rent on Amazon, YouTube, iTunes and Google Play.

“México Barbaro” Part I and Part II

From “Siete Veses Siete,” featured in “México Bárabro I.” Credit: No Real Danger/Simplemente Films

In this horror anthology from Mexico, eight directors created a 10-minute segment to tell a story that revolves around Mexican traditions and legends, and the result is horrifying. Garza Cervera’s segment, “Vitriol,” appears in “México Bárbaro II’

Pat I is available on Netflix. Both parts are available for rent on Amazon.

Mujer Lobo” by Tamae Garateuy

A still from “Mujer Lobo.” Photo credit: Cleveland International Festival/Crudo Films

“This movie shows an empowered woman dealing with our patriarchal world,” says Garza Cervera. “It is a clear example of how genre can be used with a complete different perspective and transform the person who is usually the victim character into a strong woman, owner of her life and decisions.” How does this character do this? By seducing men she meets in the Buenos Aires subway, having sex with them, then murdering them. Neat!

“The Babadook” by Jennifer Kent

Looking for The Babadook. Photo credit: Pitch.com/Causeway Films

Jennifer Kent’s first feature film tells the story of a single mom facing her inner fears of raising a child by herself. Those fears take the form of what Garza Cerver calls an “amazing antagonist.” The Babadook is creepy and wears a top hat, and somehow has also become a gay icon.

You can rent “The Babadook” on YouTube, iTunes, Amazon and Google Play, or stream on Showtime.

“Get Out” by Jordan Peele

A scene from Get Out. Photo Credit: The Mary Sue/Monkeypaw Productions.

“Get Out” was one of the biggest films of 2017, telling the story of a young black man who goes to meet his white girlfriend’s family in the middle of the woods. That’s when shit gets crazy, and racist af.

“This is an amazing horror film that tells a great and thrilling story, and makes a deep analysis of the kind of not-in-your-face racism within liberal white people,” says Garza Ververa.

Rent “Get Out” on Amazin, Vudu, iTunes or Google Play. It’s also available on HBO.

“El Espinazo del Diablo” by Guillermo del Toro

A creepy child in “El Espinazo del Diablo.” Photo credit: Groucho Reviews/Canal+ /Good Machine

Before Guillermo del Toro became one of the biggest directors in Hollywood, he made a name for himself with this film — one of his earlier works. “El Espinazo del Diablo,” or “The Devil’s Backbone,” tells the story of a 12-year-old boy who ends up in a haunted orphanage. Del Toro loves a creepy child story, and this is one of his firsts.

“One of the bests from this masterful director,” says Garza Cervera. “It is a poetic ghost story that talks about the horrors of war.”

Watch on YouTube, Amazon, Vudu, Google Play and iTunes.

“Trouble Every Day” by Claire Denis

Trouble Every Day is bloody good. Photo credit: CineFiles/Arte France Cinema

This existential French horror film delves into gender roles through the story of an American couple on their honeymoon in Paris, experiments in the human libido, and the imprisonment of a woman. It gets pretty bloody. Garza Cervera calls it “one of the first movies from the new French extremity wave.”

Available for streaming on Amazon Prime.

“Rebeca a Esas Alturas” by Luciana Jauffred

Rebeca A Estas Alturas. Photo credit: Vimeo/La Fabrica Films Mexico

Garza Cervera calls this Mexican short film one of her favorites of all time. It’s the story of a mother and housewife who has a very hard time succumbing to those roles.

“It is a clever story that talks about the inner trouble housewives deal with in a fantastic way,” she says.

Watch the whole thing on Vimeo.

Happy Halloween!


RENT: 17 Perfectly Creepy Horror Movies By Latinos To Watch Before You Die

Ready for a good scare tonight? Then share this story with your friends and plan a movie night!

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Everything To Stream This Month On Netflix Including Michelle Obama’s New Puppet Show

Entertainment

Everything To Stream This Month On Netflix Including Michelle Obama’s New Puppet Show

This March we’re all still in quarantine but there’s no doubt that streamers have upped their binge game! From new True Crime series to a Biggie Small documentary, there’s tons of content to binge and love this March.

Check them out below!

March 1

Biggie: I Got a Story to Tell  

Batman Begins 

Blanche Gardin: Bonne Nuit Blanche (2021)

Crazy, Stupid, Love

Dances with Wolves 

DC Super Hero Girls: Season 1

I Am Legend 

Invictus 

Jason X 

Killing Gunther 

LEGO Marvel Spider-Man: Vexed by Venom 

Nights in Rodanthe

Power Rangers Beast  : S2

Rain Man 

Step Up: Revolution 

Tenacious D in The Pick of Destiny 

The Dark Knight 

The Pursuit of Happyness 

Training Day 

Two Weeks Notice 

Year One 

March 2

Black or White

Word Party: Season 5 

March 3

Moxie 

Murder Among the Mormons 

Parker

Safe Haven 

March 4

Pacific Rim: The Black 

March 5

City of Ghosts 

Dogwashers 

Nevenka: Breaking the Silence 

Pokémon Journeys: The Series: Part 4 

Sentinelle 

March 8

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kjgwD61xooU

Bombay Begums 

Bombay Rose 

March 9

The Houseboat 

StarBeam: Season 3 

March 10

Dealer

Last Chance U: Basketball 

Marriage or Mortgage 

March 11

The Block Island Sound

Coven of Sisters 

March 12

Love Alarm: Season 2

The One 

Paper Lives 

Paradise PD: Part 3 

YES DAY 

March 14

Audrey

March 15

Bakugan: Armored Alliance

The BFG

The Last Blockbuster

The Lost Pirate Kingdom 

Zero Chill 

March 16

RebellComedy: Straight Outta the Zoo

Savages 

Waffles + Mochi 

March 17

Operation Varsity Blues: The College Admissions Scandal 

‘The Innocents’ Cast Test Their Supernatural Movie Knowledge

Under Suspicion: Uncovering the Wesphael Case 

March 18

B: The Beginning Succession

Cabras da Peste 

Deadly Illusions

The Fluffy Movie

Nate Bargatze: The Greatest Average American 

Skylines

March 19

Alien TV: Season 2  

Country Comfort 

Formula 1: Drive to Survive: Season 3

Sky Rojo 

March 20

Jiu Jitsu

March 22

Navillera

Philomena

March 23

Loyiso Gola: Unlearning 

March 24

Seaspiracy

Who Killed Sara?  

March 25

Caught by a Wave 

DOTA: Dragon’s Blood 

Millennials: Season 3

Secret Magic Control Agency

March 26

A Week Away

Bad Trip

Big Time Rush: Seasons 1-4

Croupier

The Irregulars

Magic for Humans by Mago Pop 

Nailed It!: Double Trouble 

March 29

Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom

Rainbow High: Season 1

March 30

7 Yards: The Chris Norton Story

Octonauts & the Ring of Fire

March 31

At Eternity’s Gate

Haunted: Latin America 

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Sasha Calle Is Officially The DC Universe’s First-Ever Latina Supergirl

Entertainment

Sasha Calle Is Officially The DC Universe’s First-Ever Latina Supergirl

The DC Universe just got a heck of a lot more Brown.

This week, it was announced that 25-year-old actress Sasha Calle is poised to be the franchise’s newest superstar. Known for portraying Lola Rosales on “The Young and the Restless,” the actress will take on the role of Supergirl in the DC film franchise.

Her first appearance as Supergirl expected to debut in the upcoming movie “The Flash.”

Calle, who is of Colombian heritage, is set to become the first Latina ever to play the role of Supergirl.

Calle earned her first breakout role in 2018 after being cast in the long-running CBS daytime drama “The Young & The Restless” as a food truck owner and the youngest sister of brothers in the midst of a toxic rivalry.

Calle earned a Daytime Emmy nomination in the Outstanding Young Performer in a Drama Series category last year for her part in the series.

“On behalf of everyone at ‘The Young and the Restless,’ we’d like to congratulate Sasha Calle on making history and being chosen to play the first Latina Supergirl,” the daytime drama’s executive producer Anthony Morina and co-executive producer/head writer Josh Griffith shared in a statement. “The role of Supergirl is a perfect fit for someone of Sasha’s immense talent, and we wish her all the best as she takes on this groundbreaking role.”

According to Deadline, Calle beat out 425 actresses for the part of Supergirl.

Andy Muschietti director of The Flash gave Calle the good news about her role over Zoom.

“Can I freak out for a second?” Calle asked before announcing the news to someone offscreen. “I got it,” she said to the person off-camera while doing a dance in her chair. Turning back to Muschietti, Calle admitted “I’m probably not going to stop crying all day.”

Calle shared the moment to her Instagram admitting she was still processing the big news.

“A Latina superhero?!” Calle wrote of the news in Spanish. “On what planet?! Well, on this planet! What joy and what pride.” Thanking her mom, Calle wrote, “I adore you with everything I have. You are an example of a superhero.”

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