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If You’re Looking For A Scary Yet Woke Halloween Movie To Watch, This Indie Horror Filmmaker Has You Covered

Groucho Reviews/Canal+ /Good Machine

Halloween is here, and while some are getting ready with their Latino-inspired costumes for a night or trick-or-treating or partying, the homebodies out there might be looking to make it a Blockbuster night. RIP Blockbuster Video.

For you horror fans looking for something a little bit different —  maybe something new, something scary, something that uses the genre in order to creatively delve into social issues and gender roles, then award-winning horror filmmaker Michelle Garza Cervera has you covered.

CREDIT: Michelle Garza Cervera

“Gender issues have been present in horror films since the beginning of cinema. Monsters with specific gender and bodily differences exist in most classic horror films,” says Garza Cervera, a Mexico City-native who makes movies that bring a much-needed Latin American and female perspective to the genre.

“Even though gender was present, it has mostly kept a one-sided perspective since the majority of directors and producers have been male, which causes most of the spectators to also be male,” she adds. “This reality has created stereotypical female characters that are molded by writers and directors that are not interested in understanding the real complexity of femininity and doesn’t allow the female spectators to deeply empathize with the characters.”

However, Garza Cervera and many others are looking to change that. The filmmaker has written and directed short films that have been selected in more than 40 international film festivals, with her short film “Clara’s Rage” winning several awards, including Best National Short at the Campeche Film Festival. She’s currently writing her first feature film thanks to support from the Mexican Institute of Cinematography.

CREDIT: Clara’s Rage / Michelle Garza Cervera

“Fortunately, there are more and more different perspectives inside the horror genre, not only in gender but also in race and culture, which only makes horror films richer and stronger,” she says. “There are great example of horror movies that use the characteristics of its genre to understand it’s characters, their context and cultural background and make a metaphor of the real human conflict that she or he is facing.”

It’s a good thing Garza Cervera comes with some solid spooky and terrifying recommendations. Here’s her list of eight horror films with a socially conscious slant for your Halloween pleasure.

“El Paramo (The Squad)” by Jaime Osorio

CREDIT: A still from “El Paramo.” Credit: Rotten Tomatoes/Rhayuela Cine

“It’s a psychological thriller that talks about the conflict with the guerrilla in Colombia through the story of a squad of soldiers stuck with a woman in a military base in the middle of the mountains,” explains Garza Cervera.

It’s available for free on Vudu and for rent on Amazon, YouTube, iTunes and Google Play.

“México Barbaro” Part I and Part II

CREDIT: From “Siete Veses Siete,” featured in “México Bárabro I.” Credit: No Real Danger/Simplemente Films

In this horror anthology from Mexico, eight directors created a 10-minute segment to tell a story that revolves around Mexican traditions and legends, and the result is horrifying. Garza Cervera’s segment, “Vitriol,” appears in “México Bárbaro II’

Pat I is available on Netflix. Both parts are available for rent on Amazon.

Mujer Lobo” by Tamae Garateuy

CREDIT: A still from “Mujer Lobo.” Photo credit: Cleveland International Festival/Crudo Films

“This movie shows an empowered woman dealing with our patriarchal world,” says Garza Cervera. “It is a clear example of how genre can be used with a complete different perspective and transform the person who is usually the victim character into a strong woman, owner of her life and decisions.” How does this character do this? By seducing men she meets in the Buenos Aires subway, having sex with them, then murdering them. Neat!

“The Babadook” by Jennifer Kent

CREDIT: Looking for The Babadook. Photo credit: Pitch.com/Causeway Films

Jennifer Kent’s first feature film tells the story of a single mom facing her inner fears of raising a child by herself. Those fears take the form of what Garza Cerver calls an “amazing antagonist.” The Babadook is creepy and wears a top hat, and somehow has also become a gay icon.

You can rent “The Babadook” on YouTube, iTunes, Amazon and Google Play, or stream on Showtime.

“Get Out” by Jordan Peele

CREDIT: A scene from Get Out. Photo Credit: The Mary Sue/Monkeypaw Productions.

“Get Out” was one of the biggest films of 2017, telling the story of a young black man who goes to meet his white girlfriend’s family in the middle of the woods. That’s when shit gets crazy, and racist af.

“This is an amazing horror film that tells a great and thrilling story, and makes a deep analysis of the kind of not-in-your-face racism within liberal white people,” says Garza Ververa.

Rent “Get Out” on Amazin, Vudu, iTunes or Google Play. It’s also available on HBO.

“El Espinazo del Diablo” by Guillermo del Toro

CREDIT: A creepy child in “El Espinazo del Diablo.” Photo credit: Groucho Reviews/Canal+ /Good Machine

Before Guillermo del Toro became one of the biggest directors in Hollywood, he made a name for himself with this film — one of his earlier works. “El Espinazo del Diablo,” or “The Devil’s Backbone,” tells the story of a 12-year-old boy who ends up in a haunted orphanage. Del Toro loves a creepy child story, and this is one of his firsts.

“One of the bests from this masterful director,” says Garza Cervera. “It is a poetic ghost story that talks about the horrors of war.”

Watch on YouTube, Amazon, Vudu, Google Play and iTunes.

“Trouble Every Day” by Claire Denis

CREDIT: Trouble Every Day is bloody good. Photo credit: CineFiles/Arte France Cinema

This existential French horror film delves into gender roles through the story of an American couple on their honeymoon in Paris, experiments in the human libido, and the imprisonment of a woman. It gets pretty bloody. Garza Cervera calls it “one of the first movies from the new French extremity wave.”

Available for streaming on Amazon Prime.

“Rebeca a Esas Alturas” by Luciana Jauffred

CREDIT: Rebeca A Estas Alturas. Photo credit: Vimeo/La Fabrica Films Mexico

Garza Cervera calls this Mexican short film one of her favorites of all time. It’s the story of a mother and housewife who has a very hard time succumbing to those roles.

“It is a clever story that talks about the inner trouble housewives deal with in a fantastic way,” she says.

Watch the whole thing on Vimeo.

Happy Halloween!


RENT: 17 Perfectly Creepy Horror Movies By Latinos To Watch Before You Die

Ready for a good scare tonight? Then share this story with your friends and plan a movie night!

J.Lo And A-Rod Opened Up About Their Relationship In Vanity Fair

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J.Lo And A-Rod Opened Up About Their Relationship In Vanity Fair

When it comes to J.Lo and A.Rod as a couple, well what is there to say? They’re both incredibly rich and gorgeous. We’ve seen them both display both the good and bad of their various relationships in the past, so what else is there to know? Lots, apparently.

Reading about “J-Rod” in the December issue of Vanity Fair has me feeling all sorts of emotions, and not the ones I was expecting. Here are some of the most surprising details.

They met more than a decade ago, so what took so long for J.Lo and A.Rod to get together?

The way Lopez and Rodriguez discuss meeting earlier this year, which led to their relationship, you’d think it was the first time they ever met. They actually met 12 years ago, but it took them a while to find each other when they were both single. They say if they had met sooner, the relationship wouldn’t have worked. “We had to grow and discover ourselves first,” Lopez said.

Marc Anthony was there the first time they met.

So, 12 years ago, Marc Anthony was throwing out the first pitch at a New York Mets game. There was a moment in which Lopez and Rodriguez shook hands and “locked eyes.” In the article, Lopez asks Rodriguez if she remembers when they first met: “You don’t have to say you remember if you don’t.” He responds, “Shea Stadium, during a subway series.”

During their first date, Rodriguez wasn’t sure if Lopez was single.

The couple talked about their first time going out: a dinner date at the Bel Air hotel. During their conversation, Lopez revealed she was single (as if being on the date didn’t give it away).

“So I’m sitting there and he’s walking back, and I get a text,” Lopez said. (Rodriguez texted her while he walked away to compose himself upon learning she was single). The text said: “You look sexy AF.”

Soon after this OMG moment, an alarm went off.

“And then [the date] took a turn,” Lopez said. “The fire alarm went off, and we had to evacuate. No, really. The fire alarm went off!”

They have way more in common than just being rich and Latino.

We are very much twins,” Rodriguez says. “We’re both Leos; we’re both from New York; we’re both Latino and about 20 other things.” They were both in their 20s when their career took off and also had public downfalls in their work and in their relationships.

Rodriguez always speaks in baseball jargon.

During the article, I had to re-read a couple of sentences, thinking the conversation had shifted to baseball, but nope. Rodriguez articulates everything in baseball terms. For example: “The work I did, that was one of the most painful and most rewarding experiences of my life, and it continues to this day. I tell myself, ‘I’m rounding first base and going to second base. It’s a process.'” When Rodriguez describes his first date with Lopez, he says: “She told me around the third or fourth inning that she was single.”

You forget they’re a celebrity couple when they talk about their love (but not when you see the photos in Vanity Fair).

I’m going to confess here, it’s hard for me to see them as anything other than a celebrity power couple because they have bigger-than-life personas. But reading Lopez talk about the moment she approached him for the first time is so cute!

Lopez said she wasn’t intending to say hello to Rodriguez, but something compelled her to do it. She says she was dressed as her “Shades of Blue” character, Harlee Santos.

I almost yelled out ‘Alex,’ but I am the shyest person when it comes to things like that,” Lopez said. “But I walk over and tap him on the shoulder and say ‘Hey.'”

And that was it.

Apparently, they’re both fans of the movie “Blood In Blood Out.”

https://www.instagram.com/p/Ba1FblDAAKU/?hl=en&tagged=bloodinbloodout

When they first began dating, Lopez and Rodriguez would use the hashtag #bloodinbloodout in text messages to each other.

Rodriguez will be a regular on “Shark Tank.”

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@arod means business. #SharkTank

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Along with being the first Latino shark on “Shark Tank,” Rodriguez will also star in a reality show on CNBC where he mentors retired athletes who are struggling financially.

Lopez and Rodriguez aren’t afraid to show vulnerability.

Lopez often says she loves being in relationships out of fear of being alone. She talks about taking a real “time out,” after her relationship with Casper, to be single and find herself again.

Rodriguez also talked about getting busted for using performance-enhancing drugs in 2014. “I remember thinking one night . . . Don’t know if I told you this, babe [he says to Lopez] . . . In the middle of this craziness, I remember it’s three A.M., four A.M., and like many nights, I couldn’t sleep. I’m not a crier, but I’m bawling. . . . My pillows are now soaking wet, and it’s the middle of the night, and I’m thinking I’m the only fucking asshole that gets pocket aces and figures out a way to lose the hand. I was so angry at myself, so pissed off, that it was hard to breathe.”

This is what an adult relationship looks like.

We have seen these two in and out of relationships, and while I am not one to judge, it truly feels that they are both seeking that one person that “gets” them.

“I understand him in a way that I don’t think anyone else could, and he understands me in a way that no one else could ever,” Lopez says. “In his 20s, he came into big success with the biggest baseball contract [at the time]. I had a No. 1 movie and a No. 1 album and made history. We both had ups and downs and challenges in our 30s, and by our 40s we’d both been through so much. And more importantly than anything, we had both done a lot of work on ourselves.”

READ: J.Lo and A-Rod Are The Epitome Of Relationship Goals In This Workout Video They Shared

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