Entertainment

Guillermo Del Toro Makes His Country Proud And Makes 12 Students Dreams Come True

One group of students is a step closer to making their dreams come true, in no small part thanks to Mexican director Guillermo del Toro.

The director has often had a knack for making wishes come true – whether it be the starring character in “Shape of Water” or the slightly terrifying creatures of “Pans Labyrinth.”

But this time he’s helped grant the wishes of 12 Mexican math students who are aiming to travel to the International Math Competition happening this summer in South Africa.

Credit: @RealGDT / Twitter

The news quickly went viral and reached the ears of Guillermo del Toro, who then took to Twitter and wrote: “I offer to cover the airline tickets for all 12 members of the Olympic math team to South Africa. @CDMXOMM, I’m following you. Send me a DM, please. Abrazos.”

It all started on Thursday when Matemáticas CDMX shared a video thanking supporters for donations to help them reach their goal.

The team was coming up short and without much support from the government, they weren’t likely to make the trip on their own – dashing their dreams of competing in South Africa.

Once news broke that GDT, as he’s affectionately called in Mexico, was to cover the flight costs, many were shocked and grateful.

Credit: @CDMXOMM / Twitter

The mathmatics team themselves were shocked by the news and took to Twitter to say: “Wow! Just let us get up from the blackout!”

Many across social media were celebrating the gesture but it was the little math geniuses who were celebrating the greatest, as they’ll now be able to represent their country at this international event. The team took to Twitter to say they were “Excited, but above all motivated to give Mexico the international recognition that it deserves, we thank the community and other donors for their support of the Olympic team heading to South Africa…,” they wrote, noting that del Toro also will cover the flight tickets of another team that will attend a competition in the United Kingdom.

Many didn’t exactly know what to make of GDT trending on social media. Maybe he had a new movie in the works?

Credit: @FadedYoda / Twitter

Although we are all here for his incredible kindness, wouldn’t it be amazing if he also announced he was working on a new film?

But once everyone realized what was happening, everyone came out to thank him!

Credit: @Cocainelol / Twitter

We imagine there are many many Mexicans who feel the exact same way.

With the lack of support from the government, many were relieved that someone stepped up to help the kids achieve their goals.

Credit: @madame_Fogg / Twitter

One person on Twitter summed it up by saying “This dude, this is how it’s done!”

Others on Twitter were proud to see one of their own taking action to help the less fortunate.

Credit: @madame_Fogg / Twitter

Translation: “Guillermo del Toro, why did you pay for the plane tickets for the national math team?” “Because I am Mexican.”

Many were so moved by the generosity and shared how much hope it had given them.

Credit: @marialuisalg1 / Twitter

With one person taking to Twitter to say: “Guillermo del Toro, today with your incredible gesture I again have hope in our country we can improve if there are more people like you.”

READ: 23 Reasons Why Guillermo Del Toro Is Definitely Walk Of Fame Material

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Mexico City Could Soon Change Its Name To Better Embrace Its Indigenous Identity

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Mexico City Could Soon Change Its Name To Better Embrace Its Indigenous Identity

Mexico City is the oldest surviving capital city in all of the Americas. It also is one of only two that actually served as capitals of their Indigenous communities – the other being Quito, Ecuador. But much of that incredible history is washed over in history books, tourism advertisements, and the everyday hustle and bustle of a city of 21 million people.

Recently, city residents voted on a non-binding resolution that could see the city’s name changed back to it’s pre-Hispanic origin to help shine a light on its rich Indigenous history.

Mexico City could soon be renamed in honor of its pre-Hispanic identity.

A recent poll shows that 54% of chilangos (as residents of Mexico City are called) are in favor of changing the city’s official name from Ciudad de México to México-Tenochtitlán. In contrast, 42% of respondents said they didn’t support a name change while 4% said they they didn’t know.

Conducted earlier this month as Mexico City gears up to mark the 500th anniversary of the fall of the Aztec empire capital with a series of cultural events, the poll also asked respondents if they identified more as Mexicas, as Aztec people were also known, Spanish or mestizo (mixed indigenous and Spanish blood).

Mestizo was the most popular response, with 55% of respondents saying they identified as such while 37% saw themselves more as Mexicas. Only 4% identified as Spaniards and the same percentage said they didn’t know with whom they identified most.

The poll also touched on the city’s history.

The ancient city of Tenochtitlán.

The same poll also asked people if they thought that the 500th anniversary of the Spanish conquest of Tenochtitlán by Spanish conquistadoresshould be commemorated or forgotten, 80% chose the former option while just 16% opted for the latter.

Three-quarters of respondents said they preferred areas of the the capital where colonial-era architecture predominates, such as the historic center, while 24% said that they favored zones with modern architecture.

There are also numerous examples of pre-Hispanic architecture in Mexico City including the Templo Mayor, Tlatelolco and Cuicuilco archaeological sites.

Tenochtitlán was one of the world’s most advanced cities when the Spanish arrived.

Tenochtitlán, which means “place where prickly pears abound” in Náhuatl, was founded by the Mexica people in 1325 on an island located on Lake Texcoco. The legend goes that they decided to build a city on the island because they saw the omen they were seeking: an eagle devouring a snake while perched on a nopal.

At its peak, it was the largest city in the pre-Columbian Americas. It subsequently became a cabecera of the Viceroyalty of New Spain. Today, the ruins of Tenochtitlán are in the historic center of the Mexican capital. The World Heritage Site of Xochimilco contains what remains of the geography (water, boats, floating gardens) of the Mexica capital.

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Mexico Plunges 23 Places On The World Happiness Report As The Country Struggles To Bounce Back

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Mexico Plunges 23 Places On The World Happiness Report As The Country Struggles To Bounce Back

When it comes to international happiness rankings, Mexico has long done well in many measurements. In fact, in 2019, Mexico placed number 23 beating out every other Latin American country except for Costa Rica. But in 2020, things looks a lot different as the country slipped 23 spots on the list. What does this mean for Mexico and its residents? 

Mexico slips 23 spots on the World Happiness Report thanks to a variety of compelling factors.

Mexico plummeted 23 places to the 46th happiest nation in the world, according to the 2020 happiness rankings in the latest edition of the United Nations’ World Happiness Report. The coronavirus pandemic had a significant impact on Mexicans’ happiness in 2020, the new report indicates.

“Covid-19 has shaken, taken, and reshaped lives everywhere,” the report noted, and that is especially true in Mexico, where almost 200,000 people have lost their lives to the disease and millions lost their jobs last year as the economy recorded its worst downturn since the Great Depression.

Based on results of the Gallup World Poll as well as an analysis of data related to the happiness impacts of Covid-19, Mexico’s score on the World Happiness Report index was 5.96, an 8% slump compared to its average score between 2017 and 2019 when its average ranking was 23rd.

The only nations that dropped more than Mexico – the worst country to be in during the pandemic, according to an analysis by the Bloomberg news agency – were El Salvador, the Philippines and Benin.

Mexico has struggled especially hard against the Coronavirus pandemic. 

Since the pandemic started, Mexico has fared far worse than many other countries across Latin America. Today, there are reports that Mexico has been undercounting and underreporting both the number of confirmed cases and the number of deaths. Given this reality, the country is 2nd worst in the world when it comes to number of suspected deaths, with more than 200,000 people dead. 

Could the happiness level have an impact on this year’s elections?

Given that Mexico’s decline in the rankings appears related to the severity of the coronavirus pandemic here, one might assume that the popularity of the federal government – which has been widely condemned for its management of the crisis from both a health and economic perspective – would take a hit.

But a poll published earlier this month found that 55.9% of respondents approved of President López Obrador’s management of the pandemic and 44% indicated that they would vote for the ruling Morena party if the election for federal deputies were held the day they were polled.

Support for Morena, which apparently got a shot in the arm from the national vaccination program even as it proceeded slowly, was more than four times higher than that for the two main opposition parties, the PAN and the PRI.

Still, Mexico’s slide in the happiness rankings could give López Obrador – who has claimed that ordinary Mexicans are happier with him in office – pause for thought.

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