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WOC Could NEVER Get Away With What Elizabeth Holmes Did Even Though Latino Businesses Contribute $700 Billion To The Economy

HBO

If you don’t know the story of Elizabeth Holmes by now HBO’s latest documentary “The Inventor: Out for Blood In Silicon Valley” will get you somewhere on the scale of understanding. The film, which debuted Monday night, works to debunk all that we know to be true about Holmes. First, that she is con-artist who convinced rich older men to invest in a falsehood while armed with a black turtleneck. And second, that in doing so destroyed peoples’ lives.

The Alex Gibney directed documentary softly focuses its lens on the Stanford dropout and disgraced Silicon Valley who sold investors on an impossible idea.

While Gibney’s documentary is sympathetic to Holmes, we must remember the facts about Holmes and her company Theranos as we know them. The facts: she captivated the world and big-time business investors ( Rupert Murdoch and Betsy Devos among them) when she promised the world’s most revolutionary invention: an at-home toolkit that, with just a prick of a finger and a single drop of blood, could run up to 200 diagnostic health tests.

More facts: Holmes would never have been able to pull off such a ruse if she’d been a Latina.

The most appalling aspect of Holmes’ story is also what the documentary fails to address. The blind faith in her company would never have been lent to one of the 4.4 million Latino-owned small business in the U.S.

https://www.facebook.com/pattyrodriguez/posts/10156911827798604

Older, established white men (and Betsy Devos) placed all their faith and finances in Holmes’ idea only find years later that they had invested in a company built on sand. Up until Theranos’s rise, Holmes was a Stanford drop out, her great grandfather was an entrepreneur and her uncle was a doctor. In the film, Theranos chairman Don Lucas explains that he was certain that Holmes, at the time a 22-year-old college dropout, “came by it naturally” because of the accomplishments of the men in her family.

Because nowhere in 2019 Trump- run USA would a Latino get away wit this caca.

@AgeofIrony / Twitter

So for real. Lock her up.

@tiaremeliza / Instagram

Check out the trailer for this woman below.




Male-dominated, underrepresentation and privilege are just some words to describe the tech industry. Less than 20 percent of women make up the tech space, and that number drops even lower when it comes to women of color. But these stats haven’t discouraged Latinas from leaving their mark in the tech world.

Here, 7 Latinas killing it in the tech industry.

1. Gretel Perera

(Courtesy of Gretel Perera)

For Venezuelan-born Gretel Perera, the most exciting part of technology is storytelling.

The PR professional has been specializing in tech companies for the past decade, working for brands like HomeAway, Evernote and Dell. In 2014, she and friend Rocio Medina felt there wasn’t a community for Latinas in the industry and together founded Latinas in Tech, a nonprofit organization with the mission to connect, support and empower Latina women working in the field.

Their org, which Perera calls a “full-time passion,” started out as a couple Latinas in the tech space meeting up at bars to discuss the challenges they faced at work. Fast-forward to today, they host meetups inside tech companies like Google and Lyft.

“Our community has more than 2 thousand women working in tech, from more than 15 countries. In all the major companies, we have a presence. Women who are entrepreneurs, investors, marketing professionals, engineers, cybersecurity experts, etc,’” Perera told FIERCE.

There are challenges Latinas face when culturally adapting to an environment as dynamic as Silicon Valley. To start: It’s fast-paced and male-dominated, but Latinas in Tech offers meetups and various panels in the U.S. and Mexico that educate women on how to use their culture as a strategic tool for their careers.

“You have a different perspective you can bring to a company,” she said. “We want Latinas to learn how to package it and market themselves differently compared to someone who doesn’t have it.”

2. Janel Martinez

(Courtesy of Janel Martinez)

Janel Martinez was born in New York to Honduran parents. Growing up, she was obsessed with all things media. From watching the news after school to catching up on popular shows, she was very aware from an early age of what representation looked like in mainstream media and that she never saw a complete view of her identity in it.

She started her own career in media at a business publication. While interviewing entrepreneurs, she realized they all said something similar: “I created this because I saw there was no solution for it.” She carried these words with her until 2013, when she launched Ain’t I Latina, a digital destination that celebrates and highlights Afro-Latinas.

Her advice for young Latinas looking to get into the tech space? Go for it! With Latinas only making up a small percentage of the tech industry, Martinez understands why discouraged women of color might ask, “Why would I go for it if my chances are lower than my white counterparts?” But she doesn’t want them to be brought down by the numbers.

“There’s going to be times you’re the only Latina in the room, but don’t let that hold you back because you definitely are deserving and worthy to be in that space if you want it,” she told us.

3. Nathalie Molina Niño

(Courtesy of Nathalie Molina Niño)

Nathalie Molina Niño started her first startup when she was 20. Now, nearly two decades later, she is the CEO and founder of BRAVA Investments, which targets high-growth, scalable businesses that deliver a measurable economic benefit to women.

That’s not all. Molina Niño also founded the Center for Women Entrepreneurs at Barnard College of Columbia University, where she teaches; works on a TV show about women of color in STEM, whose pilot has been picked up by Freeform; and has a book, LEAPFROG: The New Revolution for Women Entrepreneurs, that is set to hit bookshelves in August. The book was inspired by the myth, often perpetuated in other startup literature, that people who want to open businesses have wealthy friends and family that can write them checks.

Born to a Colombian mother and an Ecuadorian father, Molina Niño says what she admires most about the Latino community is the spirit we have to be the most entrepreneurial people in this country.

4. Natalia Carrasco

(Courtesy of Natalia Carrasco)

In San Francisco, Bolivian-born Natalia Carrasco is the director of strategy for The Town Kitchen, a community-driven food company that employs and empowers low-income youth by delivering chef-crafted, boxed lunches to corporate clients.

Carrasco has always been fascinated with using business and tech for good. “Technology can be super powerful, and when you apply that power into social good, you can make a very important impact,” Carrasco told us.

No day is ever the same for her at The Town Kitchen, but she is always looking to implement technology tools into her workplace in order to create a more efficient office. She’s currently working on a personal project that will gather local vendors with a social impact. Through it, she hopes to provide a directory for companies and individuals looking to purchase goods and services from a brand that has a positive impact in their community, whether it be vendors that hire formerly incarcerated youth or businesses run by people of color.

5. Elena Buenrostro

(Courtesy of Elena Buenrostro)

From New York to Australia, California-born Elena Buenrostro is building an international community for women who fly drones. This Mexican-American certified drone pilot never imagined she’d be doing this work. With a background in video production, last year, after deciding she would hike the Great Wall of China, she knew she wanted to make a video of it with a fresh perspective. To do so, she bought a drone.

Buenrostro became obsessed with flying her drone and soon realized that there wasn’t a community for women who were drone pilots, so she co-founded Women Who Drone, a digital space for female drone pilots, enthusiasts and aerial content creators.

Together, they strive to educate and inspire women to join the UAV industry by providing everything from workshops to brand ambassador positions in all parts of the world.  

With more than 17 thousand followers on Instagram, the Women Who Drone community continues to expand, bringing in women from all walks of life.

She now teaches people how to fly, and says the most rewarding part is when they tell her they bought a drone because of her.

“It’s a booming industry. It’s going to be worth 127 billion by 2020, and only 4 percent of women are involved in that. Drones are going to be a large part of the future,” she says.

6. Ariel Lopez

(Courtesy of Ariel Lopez)

Born in Florida and raised in North Carolina, Puerto Rican entrepreneur, career coach and public speaker Ariel Lopez is helping to train individuals on the skills they need to find careers in tech and media spaces.

She’s the founder and CEO of 2020Shift, a startup that helps tech and digital media companies diversify their recruitment process and provides leadership and skills-based training.

Lopez came up with 2020Shift in 2014, after seeing the disparity in tech among woman and people of color. Her background is in recruiting and talent acquisition, and by helping many startups hire talent, she was able to get an inside look at what companies want when hiring for tech positions.

“I started it really in the effort to prepare people for these roles and raise awareness on all the different things that you can do in tech regardless of your skillset or your background,” she says. “The misconception is: learn how to code, become an engineer and that’s your golden ticket in. When you can literally do hundreds, if not thousands, of other things within the space.”

What’s next for 2020Shift and Lopez? Knac, a platform that will be launching this summer that will actually let people showcase their skills to employers through small assessments and hiring challenges. Some of the employers participating include Snapchat, Vimeo, MasterCard and more.

7. Soledad Antelada Toledano

(Courtesy of Soledad Antelada Toledano)

Argentine-born Soledad Antelada Toledano works in cybersecurity operations at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab in San Francisco. It’s not an industry that has many women, so in 2014, she started Girls Can Hack, an organization determined to close the gender gap in tech.

Through her org, she offers guidance and empowerment to women looking to enter the cybersecurity world.

“Only 10 percent of people in cybersecurity are women, and the numbers are not going up. It is an extremely hostile field for women,” she says. “Cybersecurity nowadays is the base of the change and advancement in tech. It is changing the world politically and economically, and women are missing out.”

Antelada is also the president of The Women Scientists and Engineers Council at her lab, and she is continuing to work hard to bring diversity and inclusion to the cybersecurity space.


Read: In A White, Male Tech World, These Latinas Are Kicking Ass And Creating Space For Other Women Of Color

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These Successful Latinas Dish Their Best Advice

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These Successful Latinas Dish Their Best Advice

jlo / athena_vintage / Instagram

It’s Women’s History Month, which means that we get to reflect on the women making history this year, and hope to make the list the next year. Being a Latina woman puts us up against unique stereotypes with unique backgrounds. There is no singular Latina experience.

These women have shared how they shaped their experience of success as a Latina in a white world. Whether you want to climb to the top of the entertainment industry, politics, law, or advocacy, prepare to be inspired.

Jennifer Lopez on loving yourself.

CREDIT: @jlo / Instagram

In her own memoir, “True Love,” brilliant, filthy rich Jenny from the Block wrote,

“As women, we almost never give ourselves enough credit for what we’re capable of, for what we endure and how giving we are.
Part of loving yourself is about forgiving yourself – which is something I’ve always struggled with. It’s the messy parts that make us human, so we should embrace them too – pat ourselves on the back for getting through them rather than being angry for having gotten into them in the first place. Because loving yourself is ultimately about self-acceptance, about embracing every part of who you are. And that’s never just one thing.”

Frida Kahlo on knowing yourself.

CREDIT: @ReadingInHeels / Instagram

Kahlo famously once said, “I am my own muse, I am the subject I know best. The subject I want to know better.” May we all strive to yearn for our true selves above anyone else. This is why she is an icon.

Cardi B on the meaning of feminism.

CREDIT: @iamcardib / Instagram

We all love Cardi B, and fell hard when she told Billboard, “Being a feminist is such a great thing and some people feel like someone like me can’t be as great as that. But then some people are smart but they don’t have no common sense. They think feminism is great and only a woman that can speak properly, that has a degree, who is a boss, a businessperson… they think only Michelle Obama can be a feminist. But being a feminist is real simple; it’s that a woman can do things the same as a man. I’m equal to a n—-. Anything a man can do, I can do. I can finesse, I can hustle. We have the same freedom. I was top of the charts. I’m a woman and I did that. I do feel equal to a man.”

Laurie Hernandez on self-empowerment.

CREDIT: @lauriehernandez / Instagram

The world was watching as 16-year-old Puerto Rican American Laurie Hernandez took to the beam in the 2016 Olympics. That’s why we noticed her whisper “you got this” just before she freaking nailed it. #NewMantra

Selena Quintanilla on breaking glass ceilings.

CREDIT: @athena_vintage / Instagram

Selena shattered all expectations of the male-dominated Tejano scene, but not without difficulty. She once said, “Tejano music was hard for us because I was a girl. My dad had a lot of problems while trying to set up shows for us because there are a lot of men who don’t think that women can get the attention of the public. But … WRONG!”

Sonia Sotomayor on the power of a Latina perspective.

CREDIT: @wes_sherman / Instagram

The first Latina Supreme Court Justice overcame all odds. She was raised by an alcoholic parent, who died when she was just eight years old, and still managed to get into Princeton and then Yale Law school. When conservatives were criticizing her for parading herself as a “wise Latina,” she famously responded with this very legalese clapback:

“I would hope that a wise Latina woman with the richness of her experiences would more often than not reach a better conclusion than a white male who hasn’t lived that life.”

Justina Machado on finding humor in a political world.

CREDIT: @justinamachado / Instagram

No question, “One Day at a Time” actress, Justina Machado, is the first to call Trump a pendejo. That said, when a pendejo is criticizing you, the best clapback can be to just say, boy bye.

“I’m a wise Latina woman. Whatever, man. Thank God I’m not in politics, because the fact that you have to explain everything – I’d kill myself. I can’t take all those little things they dissect. I’m like, ‘Oh my God, get a life.’ I don’t have time for this.”  😂

Rita Moreno on authenticity.

CREDIT: @femaleACEs / Instagram

The 86-year-old award-winning actress has gifted us with her memoir and the inspo for us all to start our own: “If you’re going to write about your life, you must write about your life.” There are so many ways to interpret this, but my takeaway is that your life is unique. Cross-referencing anyone else’s will lead you astray from your goal. Be you, boo.

America Ferrera on body positivity.

CREDIT: @americaferrera / Instagram

We know her beginnings from “Real Women Have Curves” and her message stays true. “To me, the tragedy about this whole image-obsessed society is that young girls get so caught up in just achieving that, they forget to realize that they have so much more to offer the world.”

As Latinas, we’re far less likely to be naturally supermodel thin and our beautiful thoughts are more likely to be robbed by diet culture. Time to reclaim our fat, juicy brains and take up space.

Naya Rivera on having an eating disorder as a Latina.

CREDIT: @nayarivera / Instagram

In her memoir, “Sorry, Not Sorry,” the “Glee” actress opened up about her eating disorder and how her mom took it:

“I finally worked up the nerve to tell my dad that I thought I was anorexic, which was a slap in the face to my parents. I don’t think that either of them had even known anyone with an eating disorder before, and while they knew it was a big deal, they still had no idea what to do about it. At one point my mom even said, “Naya, this is some white-people shit.””

Dolores Huerta on how girls are bred to serve.

CREDIT: @doloreshuerta / Instagram

Dolores Huerta was the lead negotiator in the labor contracts between migrant farm workers and Big Ag. New moms, here’s how you make a Dolores Huerta:

“My mother never made me do anything for my brothers, like serve them. I think that’s an important lesson, especially for the Latino culture, because the women are expected to be the ones that serve and cook and whatever. Not in our family. Everybody was equal.”

Mariah Carey on turning struggles into achievements.

CREDIT: @mariahcarey / Instagram

Mariah Carey is most known as the Queen of Christmas, but many might not know that she’s battling bipolar II disorder. She told People magazine,

“I’m hopeful we can get to a place where the stigma is lifted from people going through anything alone. It can be incredibly isolating. It does not have to define you and I refuse to allow it to define me or control me.”

Eva Longoria on raising feminist men.

CREDIT: @evalongoria / Instagram

It’s no secret Longoria is a feminist. I had the honor of hearing her speak at the Women’s March when she called for radical change to the corporate bottom line, to elected positions, and systematic change to include women in America’s wealth. On Instagram, she announced that she was having a boy with this caveat:

“This boy, my son, will be surrounded by very strong, educated, powerful women and I think it’s important that he sees those types of role models in his life so he knows how to support it, how to applaud it and how to honor it.”

Gina Rodriguez on “busting that b*tch down.”

CREDIT: @hereisgina / Instagram

The star of “Jane the Virgin” knows what rejection feels like. It feels like fuel to f*ck sh*t up when you finally get that chance to make your dreams come true.

“Yes, there are 150 doors that are going to slam in your face, but there’s going to be the one with a little crack in it, and you’re going to bust that b*tch down.”

Salma Hayek on being gentle with yourself.

CREDIT: @salmahayek / Instagram

We’re all competing for the status of exhaustion in this world, but Hayek suggests competing for your happiness in this world. She told Stylist, “You have to believe in yourself. You have to take care of yourself, work for yourself, believe in yourself, and also be patient with yourself. Learn when not to push too hard, and give yourself a break.”

Selena Gomez on healing old wounds.

CREDIT: @selenagomez / Instagram

Gomez is probably the most successful young Latina out here, but she’s human, too. At the American Music Awards in 2016, she told America, “If you are broken, you do not have to stay broken.”

Carmen Yulín Cruz on scrapping the “play nice” prescription for women in politics.

CREDIT: @muerto2go / Instagram

San Juan Mayor Cruz has become a household name in the aftermath of Hurricane María. Here’s how she did that:

“Politics is a rough game, and sometimes as females we are taught that you have to play nice. Sometimes you can’t play nice.”

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on breaking the mold.

CREDIT: @thehill / Instagram

In an interview with “Girls Who Code,” AOC opened up:

“When you’re only seeing white dudes just like, running the world, you think you need to act like a white dude to run the world. The problem is that mold wasn’t made for you, and so even if you try the hardest at being that, you will not be as good as someone who is just that already.

That’s why I’ve tried really hard to authentically be myself while I’m here in this moment and in this position, because I want to show other people that there are other ways of being powerful in the world.”

Red lips and hoops, baby. I’m here for it.

Ileana Ros-Lehtinen on unconditional love.

CREDIT: @roslehtinen / Instagram

Ros-Lehtinen (R) is the first Latina to be elected to Congress and has served for thirty years. During her tenure, she’s tackled issues that today’s GOP would staunchly oppose. She raised a trans son and has fought for Marriage Equality. Here’s what she told the Human Rights Campaign:

“It’s important for families to support their children and to support their children’s choices. It’s important to listen to your children, accept your children and have your children know that you love them unconditionally. It’s not “I love you, but …”—there’s no “but.” “It’s just “I love you.”… To do otherwise is—you’re hurting yourself, you’re going to shun your child or grandchild. You’re going to say, “No, I have my views and my views are the perfect views and no one can have a different point of view. I’m right and everything else is wrong.” And that’s a lonely way to live. It just means you’ll be out of that person’s life, and who wants to be cut out of their child’s life?”

MJ Rodriguez on holding herself back.

CREDIT: @REVRYTV / Instagram

MJ Rodriguez tells Paper Magazine about what gave by the time she auditioned for hit series “Pose”:

“Well, want to know something? There was a point in time where I was scared, and I hadn’t gone in for roles before Pose had even started. I had hindered myself by being in the way and thinking that world wouldn’t receive me, and then I stepped out of my way and I started going in for roles as the woman I was. Even though my mindset was “They’re going to say no, they’re not going to want me,” I challenged myself to be 100% who I was and not care what anyone thought, and when I walked into that room and just stepped into myself, the people behind the table didn’t care!”

Believe in yourselves, hunnies, and the rest will follow.

READ: Honor #WomensHistoryMonth With These Latina Rapper Bangers