Entertainment

A Recent Poll Says More Than Half Of Women Could Not Identify The Vagina On A Diagram

Museums, by definition, are institutions that conserve collections of objects and artifacts of artistic, cultural, historical, or scientific significance. Of course, this significance is almost always influenced by a museum’s location—the Dalí Theatre-Museum surely belongs in the town of Figuieres, Spain, where Dalí lived and died, and the Blue House is the only place that could adequately capture the lives of Frida and Diego. It’s true that traveling exhibits can bring new knowledge to museums around the world, but a museum’s permanent installations are what really define its impact. As more than half the planet’s population possesses a vagina, the new Vagina Museum in London’s Camden Market is no exception. With its educational posters, sculptures, and feminist-focused gift shop, it boasts content of truly universal (and gynecological) importance.

Fueled by a goal to end stigma, support reproductive justice and promote public health initiatives, London’s Vagina Museum is the first of its kind.

credit: Instagram/@vagina_museum

Unlike Reykjavik’s famous Phallological Museum—a space densely packed with nearly 300 penile specimens from local animals—the Vagina Museum focuses on disseminating information, rather than putting biological samples on display. Even so, visitors might expect the Vagina Museum to resemble a sex museum (which, no joke, exist all over the world, from New York to Amsterdam to Barcelona), showing examples of early pornography or ancient Stone Age dildos. But in lieu of tangible collections, the Vagina Museum is dominated by its first exhibition, Muff Busters: Vagina Myths and How to Fight Them, comprised mostly of informational panels that address and shatter long-held myths about vaginal health.

“The anatomy has such complex politics around it that we found it was best to first engage people through what they know, so we can teach them things they don’t know,” said Sarah Creed, the museum’s curator, to The New York Times. “We can talk about cold, hard facts all we want, but that’s not going to change people’s minds. It’s all about unpacking social constructs and changing perspective through engagement.”

While the space itself is quite small, Florence Schechter, the museum’s founder and director, takes advantage of the museum’s intimate atmosphere to fully realize this intention. A single room with exposed brick and wood floors, the museum feels comfortable and safe, inviting people—of all genders, sexes, and ages—to enter and learn about the nuances of the female anatomy (a subject that is still widely and unnecessarily taboo). To Schechter, this information is of particular importance to visitors who themselves possess this anatomy.


“According to a recent poll, more than half the women couldn’t identify the vagina on a diagram,” she said to The Daily Beast.

credit: Isabel Infantes/Getty Images

3-D drawings and sculptures serve as original, customized extensions of the information on the posters, helping to distill and demonstrate the educational content hanging from the walls. Schechter emphasizes the necessity of these creative renderings, affirming that her museum is not rooted in the questionable, largely patriarchal tradition of “steal[ing] some stuff from Africa, put[ting] it in a building, and pretend[ing] it’s a really good thing”—to Schechter, the Vagina Museum is about connecting with its visitors in a way that is current and relevant, focusing instead on “sharing a particular story.”

With her plan to run two exhibitions per year, covering everything from human cervical health to reproduction in the animal kingdom, Schechter intends to take full advantage of this new brick-and-mortar space. On its very first day, the museum drew large, eager crowds, which seems to bode well for the museum’s future.

The Vagina Museum currently has a two-year lease on its Camden Market property, with plans to expand when the contract ends in 2021.

credit: Angus Young/The Daily Beast

“The ultimate goal is to build a permanent museum, but that takes a lot of time and resources. This is like our starter home,” Schechter told the New York Times. The Vagina Museum team has expressed surprise at the public’s positive reception, though they’ve also conceded that the internet has been difficult to navigate. 

“Algorithms are set to assume that anything with the word ‘vagina’ in it is adult content or porn,” said Development and Marketing Manager, Zoe Williams. “Our emails go to spam and our online ads get rejected, and it’s all because of stigma.” The hope is that by challenging this stigma with its educational approach, the museum—and other emergent institutions that are sure to crop up in its wake—will not continue to face this sort of issue in the future.

Fortunately, word of the Vagina Museum has spread organically, and people have continued to flock there in pursuit of knowledge, support, and camaraderie. 

“I would like people to leave the Vagina Museum knowing that there’s nothing to be ashamed of,” said Schechter. “I want to get rid of the stigma, so we can start making progress towards equal rights and protecting women around the world.”  

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Chrissy Teigen Has Been Hospitalized After Experiencing Bleeding During Her Current Pregnancy

Entertainment

Chrissy Teigen Has Been Hospitalized After Experiencing Bleeding During Her Current Pregnancy

ALBERTO E. RODRIGUEZ / GETTY

According to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, bleeding can occur at every stage of pregnancy. This occurrence, while in it’s most extreme instances can be a sign of a miscarriage, can also be chalked up to minor spotting related to sexual intercourse or pelvic exams. Still, there’s no doubt that the occurrence can be alarming as well as severe for some and that when model Chrissy Teigen realized she was experiencing such bleeding her fans became rightly worried.

Over the weekend, reports revealed that the model and mother of two had been hospitalized after experiencing heavy bleeding during her pregnancy.

Months ago Teigan shared with fans that she was expecting her third child with her husband, singer John Legend. Yesterday, she confirmed reports that she had been taken to Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles on Sunday afteer experiencing bleeding.

Just hours before she’d complained to fans on Instagram of being “so bored” while stuck on bed rest after her pregnancy was determined to be high-risk, the “Lip Sync Battle” host revealed that she was in the hospital. Opening up to fans, Teigen revealed that she had been bleeding a “little bit less than a month.”

“We all know I’ve been on bed rest for a few weeks and that’s like super serious bed rest. I get up to quickly pee and that’s it. I would take baths twice a week, no showering, just as little as possible,” she explained in a post shared from the hospital. “But I was always, always bleeding. I’m about like halfway through pregnancy and the blood has been going on for like a month. Maybe a little bit less than a month. We’re talking about more than your period girls. It’s definitely not spotting. A lot of people spot and it’s usually fine. Mine was a lot.”The 34-year-old Teigen went on to explain that she was admitted to the hospital after the bleeding worsened comparing it to ‘like if you were to turn a faucet onto low and leave it there.”

The model went onto assure her followers that she had “very good doctors who know the entire story” of her pregnancy and were taking care of her. She further explained that part of her issues with her pregnancy are related to the fact that her “placenta is really, really weak,” and added “So I feel really good, the baby’s so healthy. Growing stronger than Luna or Miles. He moves a lot, so much earlier than they ever did.”

“He’s so strong and I’m just so excited for him because he’s so wonderful and just the strongest little dude,” she exclaimed.” I can’t wait for him.” Teigen has been open about her struggles with her pregnancies in the past even sharing that her two children Luna and Miles were conceived through in vitro fertilization (IVF).

During her pregnancy, Teigen has shared the support she has been recieving from friends and family.

In posts shared to her Instagram page, the mother revealed that her daughter Luna has been giving her daily warm baths and washing her hair.

Earlier this month, Teigen accidentally revealing the sex of her baby (it’s a boy!)e while on Instagram. She has also been vocal about her pregnancy complications saying “My placenta sucks… It’s always been kind of the bad part of my pregnancies.”

“With Miles, it just stopped feeding him. It stopped taking care of him. I was stealing all his food because I was getting huge but he wasn’t getting big at all,” she noted “So he had to come out early and Luna had to come out early. I was induced both times.”

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

People Are Sharing Their Personal Experiences Of Feeling Shame Over Their Bisexuality And It’s Pretty Heartbreaking

Fierce

People Are Sharing Their Personal Experiences Of Feeling Shame Over Their Bisexuality And It’s Pretty Heartbreaking

mitu

It’s no secret that more than most sexualities, the bisexual experience is often invalidated and largely stigmatized. Often times, people who are bisexual are forced to shoulder the social stigmas from partners, friends, and family who believe that they are hiding their homosexuality, are sexually promiscuous, and or more likely to spread sexually transmitted diseases.

Curious about the effects of the stereotypes, we scoured Reddit for personal experiences with the sense of shame some people feel attached to their bisexual identity.

Check out what we found in one thread below.

https://www.reddit.com/r/bisexual/comments/4r4ha4/does_anyone_else_feel_shame/

So, I’m bi and finding some videos on the youtubes about bisexuality and started watching videos of people saying being bi doesn’t exist. I also noticed on some apps like grindr and a few others who seemed to have a ‘problem’ with my being bi for some reason. Which makes me feel bad about being bi :c

“I was really insecure about my sexuality for a long time… I still kinda am but I’m mostly ok with it Now. Sometimes I even love it. I’m not really ashamed of it anymore, I’m just incredibly introverted and very private so I’m not open to most people about it. It took me several years to come to terms with my sexuality and accept myself and I still struggle with it sometimes. I used to wish I could just be straight. But now I feel like if there was something I could do to make myself straight, I wouldn’t do it.”-Strawbeerylemonade

“No I don’t feel bad about who I am. If someone doesn’t like me for who I am, I don’t want to date them.”- EnLaSxranko

“There is a lot of misconceptions about us in the gay and straight community. I don’t feel shame but I feel awkward. No matter who I choose to be with I feel I need to explain. I’m currently in an amazing opposite gender relationship with a queer woman who I adore and we encounter bi-phobia. Today I kissed her at Pride. We are in love and queer.
I hold my relationships with my male partners in high regard and will never be ashamed that I loved them (because of their gender). So like it or not, as queer people my love for my girlfriend will be political. oh well. I’m used to it and so is she.”- torontomammasboy

“Kinda. I find it embarrassing for some reason, kinda like if I had a skin condition or something. I actually came out to my parents yesterday and they haven’t disapproved or anything but I feel really weird that they know now. Kinda exposed feeling. It’s weird. I also get the whole shame part. I don’t want to be public about my same sex attractions in the sense that they are almost purely sexual in nature. I would probably not date a guy. I’m ashamed I have sexual feelings for men but really wouldn’t date them (I could do a BFF with benefits thing but it wouldn’t be romantic at all and I don’t think I’d ‘fall in love’).”- CompartmentalizeMyBi

“I’m 25 and am currently having my homophobic mother staying with me until she finds her own place. I’ve came out to her a couple of years ago, but she dismissed it as “foolishness” and has basically been in denial about it ever since. I basically have to tip-toe around her if I want to have another guy in my own apartment. That combined with my own internalized homophobia and biphobia makes it hard not to feel ashamed of my own attractions.” – acethunder21

“No I do not feel any shame. Mostly because I actually don’t give myself any label at all. And why I don’t give myself one is because honestly, I hate labels. For jobs, for relationships, for sexuality. It all is just not something I want to deal with. Now I’m not saying that any of the the labels you give yourself aren’t any real to you. You’re reality is just as personal to you, as mine is to me. And I don’t want to get in the way of how you want to live. And that’s how everyone should really treat each other about their sexuality. I’m nearly 17, (6 days from now) and male. I’m in love with my first, and 7-month boyfriend. A lot of my friends and family know this, and I didn’t feel any different coming out about it to them than when they did not know. When wondering about your sexuality, learn it like you would playing an rpg game. Go out and explore, and find what you like, and make it yours. Hopefully my tired 1:30 am rant meant something. Have a happy night and 4th if your in the good ol’ U.S. Of A like me.”-PopsOnTheRox

“I stopped giving a f*** about what people think eons ago. Opinions are like assholes, everyone has them. Yours is the only one that should matter to you. Make yourself proud and you’ll find people respect and admire it.”-StroppyMantra

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com