Entertainment

Yalitza Aparicio Returned Home To Promote A Local Festival And Donate Laptops To Oaxacan Students, Reminding Us She Doesn’t Forget Where She’s From

With more and more people taking DNA tests, it’s no surprise that the Latinx community is celebrating their roots by honoring where they came from. What is also more surprising is that with these new indigenous discoveries, people are also giving back to the people and the land of their ancestors whether they are fourth and first generation.

One of those people is a very familiar face.

Yalitza Aparicio returned to her homeland of Oaxaca in a beautiful new campaign.

Instagram/@yalitzaapariciomtz

We have seen Aparicio working on various new advertisements, which some have raised eyebrows, but this one that celebrates her home and her people is one that we truly support.

The campaign is to promote Guelaguetza 2019, a festival in Oaxaca happening on July 22 and 29.

Instagram/@yalitzaapariciomtz

The festival celebrates all things Oaxacan. It’s also traditionally known as “Fiestas de Los Lunes del Cerro” and takes place on the last two Mondays of July.

The festival looks to be amazing!

Instagram/@guelaguetza2019

According to the website, the event is already selling out. Guelaguetza is basically an event that highlights the culture and tradition of the Oaxaca people. Click here for more information.

The only question is, will Yalizta be there?

Instagram/@guelaguetza2019

She may already be in Oaxaca. She wrote in a recent Instagram, “And how could I not to fall in love with this land that saw me being born, land of dreams, where in every corner, in every moment, you find colors that fill your soul.”

She’s such a poet!

https://www.instagram.com/p/BxlFHSTFb_G/

While we continue to check her IMDB site to see if she’s starring in any new roles, the actress is still roaming the world. We know this because we stock her Instagram, and are constantly wanting to be transported to each and every place she goes.

Of course, it’s safe to assume that this one be the last time Yalitza will be showing love for Oaxaca.

The ‘Roma’ actress recently showed her support to her community last week when she visited her hometown of Colegio de Bachilleres de Oaxaca in Tlaxiaco to donate laptops to Mixteco students. 

According to Excelsior, Yalitza, who was previously a teacher before her role in Roma, donated nine laptops to the school’s students.

Mexican Abuelito Vows To Give Kids Free Sleigh Rides In His Santa Claus Mototaxi Until He Dies

Culture

Mexican Abuelito Vows To Give Kids Free Sleigh Rides In His Santa Claus Mototaxi Until He Dies

Arturo Garcia / Facebook

For the last seven years, a Mexican abuelito has been rigging his motorcycle taxi to look like a Santa Claus sleigh, to the delight of children in his Oaxaca neighborhood, and is vowing to offer free sled rights to children for “as long as God gives me life,” he told a local outlet. Jerónimo Flores, 75, and his generosity have gone viral after a relative shared images of his mototaxi to Facebook, further spreading his Christmas cheer even beyond Juchitán, Oaxaca, the southwestern Mexican state that gave birth to the modern-day sleigh. Over the course of many years, Don Flores has been using his own savings to deck the halls of his mototaxi, purchasing materials, and constructing the design himself so that the front of the taxi looks like a giant Santa Claus head. The taxi’s headlights appear as glowing cheeks, while the driver’s windshield is protected by bushy white eyebrows and a pair of makeshift giant Santa Claus glasses.

This year, he had the idea to tow a sleigh behind the mototaxi and is vowing to let children right in the sleigh for free for as long as he lives.

Over the last couple of months, Don Flores emptied his savings account to pour 12,000 pesos ($628) to rig his mototaxi to be able to tow a sleigh full of children for free.

CREDIT: CORTA MORTAJA

Don Flores has been elevating his Santa Sleigh game every year since 2012, becoming an instant classic in his neighborhood’s Christmas celebrations. Complete with a larger-than-life Santa hat, a pink nose, and scruffy white beard, Don Flores’ Santa mototaxi is well known in his neighborhood. This Santa doesn’t retire to the North Pole all year long, however. The glowing-cheeked Mr. Claus also makes an appearance for Mexico’s Independence Day and on Halloween. This year, however, Don Flores had an idea that would require the help of his adult children and much more money. 

Don Flores built this two-row “floating” sleigh so that children could hop aboard for a ride in Santa’s sleigh for free.

CREDIT: ARTURO GARCIA / FACEBOOK

Even though Don Flores is well beyond retirement age by most folks’ standard, he continues to have to work for a living, driving his mototaxi around town. In his older age, Don Flores doesn’t seem to be slowing down. Once the idea to build the sleigh came to him, he couldn’t let it go, enlisting his sons and daughters to help him build the magical sleigh. The way they rigged the neon lights at the bottom even offers the optical illusion of a floating sleigh! “This year it occurred to me to build a sled to ride my children and children for free, without charging anything. I will continue this until God gives me life,” Don Flores told La Republica.

You better believe that the inside of Santa’s sleigh is decked out, too.

CREDIT: ARTURO GARCIA / FACEBOOK

What’s a Mexican sleigh ride without the most miniature of nativity sets anyway? Don Flores makes sure that his patrons and their children feel the magic of Christmas at every step on his mototaxi. Christmas lights line nearly every border of the taxi, from the sleigh to the brim of the Santa hat, to the seat cushions. Don Flores has become a beacon of light in every sense of the word in his community.

Santa may even need to build another sleigh to meet the demands of Juchitán’s children!

CREDIT: ARTURO GARCIA / FACEBOOK

“Beautiful ride with the mototaxi sleigh! Congratulations Abuelito Fito Flores,” Don Flores’ grandson, Arturo Garcia, posted to Facebook last week. Since then, the photos have been shared over a thousand times. “How beautiful! I already imagine the beautiful memory he is leaving his grandchildren. They will remember him forever,” one fan comments. Don’t even think about uttering, “OK, Boomer,” to this abuelito. “The most beautiful technology,” commented another fan. 

Today, Don Flores is known as the “Santa Claus de Juchitán.”

CREDIT: ARTURO GARCIA / FACEBOOK

For good reason, too. Flores has made it clear that he’s invested his money and energy into offering a little bit more magic to kids at Christmas time. “It gives me this pleasure, this joy of seeing the children,” Flores told Sopitas. If you’re in the neighborhood, you can support the good cause by becoming a paying customer of Don Flores. Every paid ride is a free ride for the children to have a big dose of Christmas magic.

READ: Here Is A 12-Song Playlist To Make Your Christmas Very Festive

Latinos Know How To Celebrate The Holidays, But Some Of The Traditions Might Be Too Weird For Gringos

Culture

Latinos Know How To Celebrate The Holidays, But Some Of The Traditions Might Be Too Weird For Gringos

Unsplash

Navidad for Latino families is a very different affair to Christmas in Anglo culture. For once, the religious aspect is much more prevalent, as Catholicism is the predominant belief and the birth of Jesus is possibly the most important date of the year (save, perhaps, the death of said religious figure in Semana Santa). Navidad among Latinos both in the United States and throughout Latin America is full of quirky family traditions that both make it more solemn and more fun. Some of these traditions are of course heritage from the Spanish colonial years,  but each country and even each family has put their own little twist. 

New Year’s Eve is also a very lively celebration that includes some strange and fun mumbo jumbo that is totally normal for many of us but might be a bit too peculiar for others. 

So here are some traditions that might get your gringo Xmas or New Year’s date running out the door!

Actually nothing says holiday season in a Latino family like the Guadalupe-Reyes marathon.

Credit: Screenshot. KeepCalmAndPosters.com

They say honesty is the best policy, right? Well, this isn’t an actual sporting event but the official start of the holiday season. The “marathon” is an eating and drinking fest that runs from the day of the Virgin of Guadalupe in December 12 until January 6, the day of the Reyes Magos or Three Wise Men. Get your stomach and your liver ready. En sus marcas, listos, fuera…  

When all the familias bring their Baby Jesus figurine and rock them all together as if they were real babies.

Credit: Digital Post

Let’s not forget the massive one that recently went viral in Mexico…

Also dressing Baby Jesus in all sorts of outlandish costumes.

Credit: @EldeForma / Giphy

Sorry (not sorry!) this can be a bit sacrilegious for some, but this gif was just too good not to share.  

Well, this is actually the sort of costume they put on Baby Jesus.

Credit: Mercado Libre

Abuelitas all over Mexico flood markets to find the best dress maker for their Baby Jesus. There is a non-spoken rivalry among households that abuelitas settle by making Baby Jesus look like a tiny Liberace (sorry, but it is true!). 

Sing the traditional Posada… or more like mumble the words hoping that the chismosos de la familia don’t figure it out.

Credit: Yucatan Holidays

The traditional posada is a song where the guests are split into two groups. One remains inside the house while the other braces the cold and stays outside. One group is supposed to represent Mary and Joseph asking to be let in, the other group takes the place of the homeowners who are not too sure to let strangers in. There is a back and forth and finally the strangers are let in and everyone sings “Entren santos peregrinos”. We are sure that half the party is mumbling the words. Hey, they even got some Latin! 

Now it is New Year’s Eve and you better wear your chones rojos.

Credit: Ali Express

Legend goes that if you want to enjoy a good sex life in the coming year, you need to wear red underwear to welcome the coming calendar. Supermarkets and department stores in Latin America are bursting with red men’s underpants and women’s lingerie. Rest assured if you bring a gringo date to the New Year’s fiesta, your primos will make sure they feel uncomfortable as hell my asking them whether they are wearing chones rojos or not! Awkward alert!

And you better be ready to haul those empty suitcases around the block at the strike of midnight!

We kid you not. Wanna have plenty of travelling in the coming year? Well, get your empty suitcases ready and take a walk around the block with them. If you think about a destination then your trip might come true. Wanna have a sexy escapade? Wear your red underwear while dragging the luggage! Makes all the sense in the world, right? Just be careful not to wake up the neighbours… come to think about it chances are they are dragging their empty maletas as well. 

Swipe away the bad vibes! Afuera lo malo, que venga lo bueno!

Every year has its ups and downs. So whether you like it or not there is some bad juju that has accumulated in your household. You clearly wanna start the year afresh and the only way to do this is to swipe off las malas vibras. Just go to the entrance of your house, pour some water on the floor and expel it to the outside world! Now, we don’t know if this is metaphysically effective or not, but it sure is cathartic.