Entertainment

This Spanish-Language Film On Netflix Is So Terrifying, I Had To Try Watching It 3 Times Before I Finished It

It took me three days to watch “Veronica” — the new Netflix Spanish-language horror film. It’s not because I was preoccupied, but because I was too scared to watch it in its entirety. In fact, after attempting to watch it twice in the evening, I ultimately had to finish it during the day. It’s that freakin’ scary.

“Veronica” isn’t your average movie about a girl playing the Ouija board.

CREDIT: Twitter/@xodeadpegasus

Ouija board storylines are quite frankly tiresome and not very interesting anymore. [Spoiler alerts ahead (sort of)!] But in this film, it centers around a teen girl trying to speak to her dead father.

Veronica has more on her plate than most teenage girls. She’s basically in charge of taking care of her siblings because their mother works the night shift at a bar. So clearly, she has a lot to deal with.

The story takes place in Spain in the early ’90s  and the fashion is low key on point.

CREDIT: Twitter/@luciavasan

Watching “Veronica” made me so nostalgic for the ’90s. Her style is so typical of most teenage girls, especially if they’re into Spanish rock. She wears Converse and the same t-shirt of her favorite band, which brings me to my next point.

The music and images of Héroes del Silencio is everywhere in this film.

For Spanish rock lovers, this part is especially cool. Héroes del Silencio is Veronica’s favorite band so she listens to them all the time, especially when she’s trying escape visions and thoughts of “it.”

I won’t disclose what “it” is because you really have to watch the film to find out.

CREDIT: Twitter/@DailyMirror

Whatever Veronica called over to the other side by playing the Ouija is indescribable. But it’s unlike anything I have ever seen on film before.

The film itself is so good, specifically Sandra Escacena who plays Veronica.

CREDIT: Twitter/@Eve_Sparda

Both Sandra and the director Paco Plaza have been nominated for several film awards.

However, the main reason you must watch “Veronica” is because it’s all real.

The film starts off by saying that the story is based on a case report by the lead detective. But once you see the entire movie, you can’t believe that actually happened to a girl. But it did!

According to Newsweek: “The case takes its name from the Madrid neighborhood where a young woman, Estefania Gutierrez Lazaro rather than Veronica, reportedly performed a seance at school. A nun broke her Ouija board, ending or interrupting the ritual. She later experienced months of seizures and hallucinations, particularly of shadows and presences surrounding her.”

I won’t tell you how it ends, but know this: the detective and others witnessed what happened to the real Veronica.

Here’s what others on social media are saying about “Veronica”

SAME!

You think you can survive watching it the whole way through, but you’re wrong.

There’s a reason for that.

Google “real story of Veronica”….Yikes!

How could this really happen?

Hope you make it through the whole movie without stopping it.

It won’t be easy, but good luck to you.

READ: RIP To George A. Romero, The Director Who Influenced Most Of The Zombie Movies You Love

Do you think you’ll watch “Veronica”? Let us know by sharing this story and commenting below!

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Latinas Share Why They Wanted To Teach Their Children Their Native Language

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Latinas Share Why They Wanted To Teach Their Children Their Native Language

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In a world with so much rising intersectionality and access to language tools, many still feel that passing along the traditions of their languages is necessary. Studies have shown for decades that children who grow up in an environment where they’re exposed to different languages have a pathway ahead of them that is full of promise. Particularly when it comes to education and career opportunities.

But why else do some parents find it essential to teach their children their family’s native languages?

Recently, we asked Latinas why learning their native language is important to them.

Check out the answer below!

“So they can be a voice for others in their community .” –_saryna_


“Besides the fact that bilingual kids use more of their brains. I’d like to teach my baby my native language so they can feel closer to our roots and be able to communicate/connect with our community not just in the US, but in Latin America too.” –shidume

“So that when the opportunity arises they can pursue their endeavors with nothing holding them back!” –candymtz13


“It not only helps them be multilingual, but also reminded them of their ancestry. Their roots. It builds a certain connection that cannot be broken.”-yeimi_herc


“So they can communicate with their grandparents, so they have double the opportunities growing up so they know their roots. So many reasons.”
elizabethm_herrera

“Know where you came from, being bilingual for more job opportunities later, being able to communicate with family members.”- panabori25

“I don’t have children but I think a language is tied to the culture. For me Spanish is a direct representation of how romantic and dramatic and over the top in the most beautiful way latin culture is. Also I’m Dominican and we just blend and make up words which really represents how crazy my family is.” –karenmarie15


“If I don’t and they lose ties to their people meaning my family who only speaks Spanish and Italian than I myself am harming them. As a preschool teacher I always tell parents English will happen eventually that’s the universal language but teach them their home home language the one that grandma/pa and the rest of the family speaks. They lose their identity. Sure they make up their own eventually but they must never forget where they come from.” –ta_ta1009


“So he doesn’t lose the connection to his grandmother and great grandfather who only speak spanish. So if he ever hears someone struggling to communicate he can help and feel a sense of pride in his roots/culture. 🇸🇻 plus 🤞🤞 I want him to pick up a 3rd language too!” –cardcrafted

“To give them more opportunities in life. I feel that some stories can only be told with authenticity when they’re in their native language. If you have the opportunity to do so, please do.” –titanyashigh

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Netflix’s Newest Musical Teen Hit Series Stars a 16-Year-Old Afro-Latina Newcomer

Entertainment

Netflix’s Newest Musical Teen Hit Series Stars a 16-Year-Old Afro-Latina Newcomer

A new teen series has dropped on Netflix that the internet can’t stop talking about. The newest cultural phenomenon that has hit the juggernaut streaming service is a musical series called Julie and the Phantoms, based on the 2011 Brazilian show of the same name.

The series follows a 16-year-old insecure girl named Julie who has lost her love of music after the tragic death of her mother. But with the help of a (stay with us here) band of musical ghosts she stumbles across in her garage, she soon re-discovers her love of singing and performing. Backed by her band of “phantoms”, Julie confidently takes the stage again, blowing everyone away in the process. ,

But the wacky, heartfelt story-line isn’t the only reason people are excited about the show. The buzz around the show is building because its star, 16-year-old newcomer Madison Reyes, is an Afro-Latina singer-actress of Puerto Rican descent.

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Que Bonita bandera 🇵🇷

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Before landing the role of Julie, Reyes was just a regular shmegular Nuyorican girl going to high school in Brooklyn. Needless to say, the process of auditioning for Julie and the Phantoms was both a whirlwind and a game-changer.

“I found out about Julie and the Phantoms through my school. At first I was nervous to send my video in, but after talking to some friends, I sent it in and got a call back,” Reyes told Refinery 29. “From there it was just figuring out when I could fly to L.A. When I finally made it out there, the audition process lasted two days.”

Reyes, for one, understands the burden of her load. “[Julie] is Latin American, she’s got textured hair, she’s a strong and independent female character,” Reyes recently told the LA Times. “As a person of color who wants more diversity [on-screen], I’m kind of scared about the hate comments that I’ve seen other people have to go through, especially women.”

As if having an Afro-Latina actress at the center of a popular Netflix show wasn’t exciting enough, the series is also being helmed by Mexican-American director and all-around legend Kenny Ortega. For those of you unfamiliar with Ortega, he is the creative genius who directed bonafide classics like High School Musical and Hocus Pocus.

Ortega has been publicly effusive in his praise of Reyes. “She has this raw talent that can take on any genre of music, and this promise of greatness that excited everybody,” he told the LA Times. “And yet she’s so relatable and grounded.”

Fans are already calling for a second season after watching the cliffhanger season finale. Reyes, herself, can’t wait to get back in the shoes of Julie. When asked in an interview about where we’ll see her next, she responded: “Hopefully in the next season of Julie and the Phantoms!”. We second that wish.

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