Entertainment

Ugly Primo Is One Latino Artist Everyone Who Loves Pop Culture Should Know About

Ugly Primo is one artist you should definitely be following. He has taken so many Latino pop culture moments and turned them into art that’s just divine. You’ll never see his face because he hides behind a puppet as his persona, but it low key works with his art aesthetic. Check out some of his art below and prepare to bask in some great Latino pop art.

Ugly Primo is already rubbing elbows with some up and coming Latino stars.

CREDIT: uglyprimo / Instagram

Do you recognize this piece of art? It is Cuco’s EP cover for ’Chiquito’ illustrated by Ugly Primo. See. You already know his art and never knew it.

He’s even besties with the one and only Bad Bunny.

CREDIT: uglyprimo / Instagrams

Ugly Primo has created custom pieces for Cuco, Bad Bunny, and so many other artists in the music industry. It’s like they are all elevating each other because that’s how Latinos do.

But it isn’t all serious work. He will take all kinds of artistic liberty and it’s amazing.

CREDIT: uglyprimo / Instagram

Just when you thought Bad Bunny had secured his tough guy persona, this Easter bunny comes around. Like, talk about showing off a softer side.

Tbh, the #1 Daddy mug for Daddy Yankee is perfect.

CREDIT: uglyprimo / Instagram

A el le gusta el cafecito, dale más cafecito. Even with sunglasses on, Ugly Primo caught Daddy Yankee’s sweet twinkle in his eyes.

Literally taking Maluma Baby to the next level.

CREDIT: uglyprimo / Instagram

Who knew Maluma could be such a daddy while still single. One thing is for sure, that baby looks well taken care of.

You can’t forget the Caribbean icons that gave the U.S. a taste of Latin music.

CREDIT: uglyprimo / Instagram

And it’s even better that her face is on a bag of sugar. Maybe it is too cliché but it never gets old.

Elvis Crespo as fabric softener just makes sense.

CREDIT: uglyprimo / Instagram

I feel like dancing but at the same time smell Downy so strong that it’s like I am currently doing laundry. Suavemente lavame.

He’ll even help you profess your love for Cardi B.

CREDIT: uglyprimo / Instagram

Who isn’t in love with this rapper right now? We can only assume she has love and fan letters coming to her everyday.

A Latino pop culture collection isn’t complete with El Chacal.

CREDIT: uglyprimo / Instagram

If you don’t know who this is, fuera! This guy lived on everyones TV on Saturday nights. It’s actually strange not to see him on the TV when you are making and eating dinner.

Ugly Primo even perfectly captured our childhood terror with a simple image called “El Trio.”

CREDIT: uglyprimo / Instagram

Suddenly you hear, “Te calmas o te calmo.” Not only are you now scared, you are confused. Like, you’re grown, living on your own but you still know mami can find you.

Obviously, El Diablote makes an appearance because it’s an honest representation.

CREDIT: uglyprimo / Instagram

I don’t remember this card, but diablote sounds like an understatement. If you win would you say buenas or magas? Guess it depends on what you think of your family/community.

Oh yeah, he also invented Tapendejo.

CREDIT: uglyprimo / Instagram

The weakest hot sauce known to man. It’s for all the people who think they are big and bad but really just watered down excuses for human beings.

Speaking of things that don’t quite make sense…

CREDIT: uglyprimo / Instagram

Are people still doing this? We hope not but the imagery is too perfect a representation that you’ll cry from shame.

But we all know who the real hero is, El Chapulin Colorado.

CREDIT: uglyprimo / Instagram

More agile than a turtle, stronger than a mouse, more noble than a lettuce, his symbol is a heart. At least someone is holding it down for us.

You can never go wrong with depicting a celebratory Lionel Messi.

CREDIT: uglyprimo / Instagram

This will get you up off your feet and clapping with your tios and tias. It’s just impossible to hear that song and not clap along.

Guillermo Ochoa is one wall Trump doesn’t want to mess with.

CREDIT: uglyprimo / Instagram

Trump asked for a wall and Mexico gave him one. I need Memo Ochoa to guard my girl’s DMs, thb. Nothing gets past him.

There’s always room to make fun of a old-school tradition, like baptisms.

CREDIT: uglyprimo / Instagram

In the name of the father the son and a modelo. The way tios welcome newborns to the family. Where’s the lie?

We do get moments to see Ugly Primo straight chilling, like watching the World Cup.

CREDIT: uglyprimo / Instagram

Unfortunately, his dreams of Mexico winning was destroyed and we’re afraid the community will never really recover. Hopefully Ugly Primo can bounce back from the defeat.

He even understands regular people’s lives, which is important to staying humble.

CREDIT: uglyprimo / Instagram

Ugly Primo has been gaining fame with his little skits. Here he shows how the Fourth of July goes down in the hood and it’s too real.

We may never know what the real Ugly Primo looks like, but at least we have the puppet.

CREDIT: uglyprimo / Instagram

His puppet has taken on a life of it’s own. Make sure you keep up to see what shenanigans he gets himself into.

Brazil President Bolsonaro Fires Secretary Of Culture After He Paraphrased A Nazi Speech

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Brazil President Bolsonaro Fires Secretary Of Culture After He Paraphrased A Nazi Speech

@phpacha / @noblecavalcante / Twitter

Brazil’s President Jair Bolsonaro fired his Secretary of Culture after he published a video that paraphrased a well-known Nazi speech at Adolf Hitler’s favorite opera. Former Secretary of Culture Roberto Alvim’s posted the video to his Twitter account Thursday evening and the overnight public outcry resulted in his firing the following day. Even the setting of the video bore so much resemblance to Nazi Germany propaganda minister Joseph Goebbel’s own desk, both with framed photographs of their elected leaders in the background. Alvim played music from the Wagner opera, Hitler’s favorite opera, in the background of his paraphrased speech from the Nazi leader’s propaganda leader.

At first, Alvim tried to chock up the viral outcry as leftist sensitivities. Eventually, he admitted that he asked his aides to Google speeches on “nationalism and art,” which inevitably led to the infamous speech by Goebbel. 

Both Joseph Goebbel and Roberto Alvim said that their country’s art will be “heroic” and “national” or “it will be nothing.”

CREDIT: @PHPACHA / TWITTER

Goebbel delivered his speech in 1933, the same year Nazis seized control of Germany, as an impassioned invitation for artists to join the nationalist movement. Goebbel was intensely anti-Semitic and eventually rose in ranks to become Hitler’s second-hand man. Hitler’s will left Goebbels as the new Chancellor of Germany, for which Goebbels accepted for just one day. The next day, Goebbels and his wife poisoned their six children with cyanide and committed suicide. Twelve years earlier, at the start of the Nazi regime, Goebbels became known for his speech that would but unwittingly plagiarized nearly a century later by Alvim. 

“German art of the next decade will be heroic, will be wildly romantic, will be objective and free of sentimentality, will be national with great pathos and equally imperative and binding, or else it will be nothing,” Goebbels became known to say.

“Brazilian art of the next decade will be heroic and it will be national… and imperative because it will be rooted in the urgent aspirations of our people, or it will be nothing,” Alvim similarly said in an address meant to announce a $4.8 million investment in Brazil’s national arts program.

Several top officials suspected that Alvim “may not be of sound mind,” but others disagree.

CREDIT: @CLUPPO / TWITTER

The speaker of the House called for Alvim’s removal from office while the Supreme Court’s highest office said that his speech must be “repudiated with vehemence.” Meanwhile, Olavo de Carvalho, a radical right YouTuber (think the Stephen Miller to Donald Trump), suspected that “it may be too early to judge, but Roberto Alvim may not be of sound mind. We’ll see,” in a Facebook post. Carvalho has since landed on a conspiracy theory that Alvim had a secretly liberal employee that sabotaged his reputation by paraphrasing Goebbel and overlaying his speech with Hitler’s favorite opera. 

Roberto Alvim couldn’t be more lucid. Had it not been for the controversy, the pressure of networks, society and the wear and tear on the political environment, it is quite likely that Bolsonaro would have kept him in office since it’s a fascist government,” tweeted another Brazilian.

Bolsonaro’s administration has decided to distance itself from Alvim regardless.

CREDIT: @NOBLECAVALCANTE / TWITTER

The day after the speech, Germany’s embassy declared, “The period of National Socialism is the darkest chapter in German history, bringing infinite suffering to humanity….We oppose any attempt to trivialize or even glorify the era of National Socialism.” Israel’s embassy issued a statement that put it bluntly: “Such a person cannot command the culture of our country and must be removed from office immediately.” Only after Israel called for Alvim’s ouster did Bolsonaro make what he called an “unfortunate pronouncement” that Alvim would be removed from office. The video is shockingly similar to Goebbel’s, stylistically, but the core nationalistic sentiments are one and the same. Alvim accepted his position as Secretary of Culture only after one of the previous title holders resigned when Bosonaro cut funding to LGBTQ+ artists.

Meanwhile, some Americans are taking the news with a soberingly dark sense of humor: “Former Brazilian culture minister Alvim should apply for immigration status here from @realDonaldTrump@GOP, and bosom buddy @LindseyGrahamSC. I’m sure that they will welcome another like-minded Nazi sympathizer into the USA,” one American tweeted. Others are saying that an elected official who has to paraphrase other speeches shouldn’t be in office anyway.

READ: This Is What Brazilians Think Of President Bolsonaro One Year Into His Presidency

This LA Play Explores The Mystery Surrounding Frida Kahlo’s Death, Her Love Affairs, And Her Passion For Art

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This LA Play Explores The Mystery Surrounding Frida Kahlo’s Death, Her Love Affairs, And Her Passion For Art

fridakahlo / Instagram

Frida Kahlo’s Death Has Long Been The Subject Of Debate —This Play Unpacks The Painter’s Last Week Of Life 

This LA Play Explores The Mystery Surrounding Frida Kahlo’s Death, Her Love Affairs, And Her Passion For Art

This Play Explores The Last Week Of Frida Kahlo’s Life —And The Mystery Will Have You On The Edge Of Your Seat

There have been many movies, television dramas and stage productions based on the life and works of Mexico’s most famous artist Frida Kahlo, but none of these stories had ever explored the woman’s last week of life. As it turns out, her death has been an open-ended and unanswered question mark. Many believe there was a cover up, and this play dives deep into the mystery. 

The award-winning playwright and actress, Odalys Nanin explores the mental, emotional and physical condition during the last week of Frida Kahlo’s life in her latest play.

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$25 Early bird tix at machatheatre.org

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‘Frida: Stroke of Passion’ peels away the secret cover up of the painter’s death and reveals what or who killed Frida Kahlo.

Until recently, Nanin, managed and produced at the MACHA Theatre in West Hollywood, CA, a company she founded years ago.

After writing and producing nearly a dozen plays, Nanin presented her last production at the MACHA last fall. The play was another original she wrote, this time about Mexico’s most controversial artist, and one of the world’s most famous painters, Frida Kahlo. 

Frida: Stroke of Passion, enjoyed a three-month long run last fall and received rave reviews and awards.

Frida Kahlo died July 13, 1954. Her death certificate alleges cause of death: “pulmunary embolism” but no autopsy was allowed and she was immediately cremated. The play explores her mental, emotional and physical condition during the last week of her life – exposing her love affair with famous Mexican singer Chavela Vargas, Maria Felix, Josephine Baker, Tina Moddoti, Leon Trotsky, a Cuban spy and her complex passionate love for Diego. 

Back by popular demand and with a grant from LA County Arts, DAC and CAC, “Frida: Strokes of Passion” premieres February 7 in Boyle Heights for six shows.

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In Nanin’s tale, Kahlo’s bout with bronchopneumonia and the loss of her right leg left her frail and numb, “Her right leg had been amputated from the knee down so she is either in her wheel chair or bed ridden.  She was under a lot of pain killers and alcohol in order to numb her pain. So she was between a daze of sleep and awakening.”

“Espero que la salida sea gozosa, y espero nunca mas volver.”

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In a diary entry written just days before her death, she wrote, “I hope the exit is joyful — and I hope never to return.” For these reasons, Nanin believes the artist took her own life.

In the play, Nanin delves deeper into Frida’s sexuality.

https://twitter.com/womensart1/status/1147401383706017792?s=21

“What initiated the spark of passion in me to write about Frida Kahlo was because as a lesbian Latinx I relate to her courage and fearless determination to stand up to injustice and to be the voice of the voiceless through her art and political activities.” 

The main players in the story are Kahlo’s tormented husband, Diego Rivera, the love of her life, but there were other lovers.

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Her passion didn’t just start or end with Rivera, there were several women in-between and one other man who also captured her heart, and during her final days, they all came visiting– taunting and haunting her with the memories they each represented. Women like Mexican singer Chavela Vargas, Mexican movie star Maria Felix, cabaret singer and dancer Josephine Baker, famous model and photographer Tina Modotti, and Cuban revolutionist/spy Teresa Provenza. There was also the ghost of Leon Trotsky, a man she admired and loved and whose murder haunted Kahlo for the rest of her days.

The production has also been released in the form of a book. 

Nanin has written a book capturing her play in print– the story goes far beyond Kahlo’s Mexican and European Surrealism, and her indigenous Mexican culture influence. Frida Kahlo hated societal rules and traditions at every level, and she felt shackled as a woman. In the book, Nanin explores her frustrations, her love affairs, her queerness and overall, her passion for art. 

“Frida – A Stroke of Passion” runs February 7–9 and 14–16 at 8 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays, and at 2 p.m. on Sundays at the Casa 0101 Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets and more information, click here.