Entertainment

Ugly Primo Is One Latino Artist Everyone Who Loves Pop Culture Should Know About

uglyprimo / Instagram

Ugly Primo is one artist you should definitely be following. He has taken so many Latino pop culture moments and turned them into art that’s just divine. You’ll never see his face because he hides behind a puppet as his persona, but it low key works with his art aesthetic. Check out some of his art below and prepare to bask in some great Latino pop art.

Ugly Primo is already rubbing elbows with some up and coming Latino stars.

CREDIT: uglyprimo / Instagram

Do you recognize this piece of art? It is Cuco’s EP cover for ’Chiquito’ illustrated by Ugly Primo. See. You already know his art and never knew it.

He’s even besties with the one and only Bad Bunny.

CREDIT: uglyprimo / Instagrams

Ugly Primo has created custom pieces for Cuco, Bad Bunny, and so many other artists in the music industry. It’s like they are all elevating each other because that’s how Latinos do.

But it isn’t all serious work. He will take all kinds of artistic liberty and it’s amazing.

CREDIT: uglyprimo / Instagram

Just when you thought Bad Bunny had secured his tough guy persona, this Easter bunny comes around. Like, talk about showing off a softer side.

Tbh, the #1 Daddy mug for Daddy Yankee is perfect.

CREDIT: uglyprimo / Instagram

A el le gusta el cafecito, dale más cafecito. Even with sunglasses on, Ugly Primo caught Daddy Yankee’s sweet twinkle in his eyes.

Literally taking Maluma Baby to the next level.

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Who knew Maluma could be such a daddy while still single. One thing is for sure, that baby looks well taken care of.

You can’t forget the Caribbean icons that gave the U.S. a taste of Latin music.

CREDIT: uglyprimo / Instagram

And it’s even better that her face is on a bag of sugar. Maybe it is too cliché but it never gets old.

Elvis Crespo as fabric softener just makes sense.

CREDIT: uglyprimo / Instagram

I feel like dancing but at the same time smell Downy so strong that it’s like I am currently doing laundry. Suavemente lavame.

He’ll even help you profess your love for Cardi B.

CREDIT: uglyprimo / Instagram

Who isn’t in love with this rapper right now? We can only assume she has love and fan letters coming to her everyday.

A Latino pop culture collection isn’t complete with El Chacal.

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If you don’t know who this is, fuera! This guy lived on everyones TV on Saturday nights. It’s actually strange not to see him on the TV when you are making and eating dinner.

Ugly Primo even perfectly captured our childhood terror with a simple image called “El Trio.”

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Suddenly you hear, “Te calmas o te calmo.” Not only are you now scared, you are confused. Like, you’re grown, living on your own but you still know mami can find you.

Obviously, El Diablote makes an appearance because it’s an honest representation.

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I don’t remember this card, but diablote sounds like an understatement. If you win would you say buenas or magas? Guess it depends on what you think of your family/community.

Oh yeah, he also invented Tapendejo.

CREDIT: uglyprimo / Instagram

The weakest hot sauce known to man. It’s for all the people who think they are big and bad but really just watered down excuses for human beings.

Speaking of things that don’t quite make sense…

CREDIT: uglyprimo / Instagram

Are people still doing this? We hope not but the imagery is too perfect a representation that you’ll cry from shame.

But we all know who the real hero is, El Chapulin Colorado.

CREDIT: uglyprimo / Instagram

More agile than a turtle, stronger than a mouse, more noble than a lettuce, his symbol is a heart. At least someone is holding it down for us.

You can never go wrong with depicting a celebratory Lionel Messi.

CREDIT: uglyprimo / Instagram

This will get you up off your feet and clapping with your tios and tias. It’s just impossible to hear that song and not clap along.

Guillermo Ochoa is one wall Trump doesn’t want to mess with.

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Trump asked for a wall and Mexico gave him one. I need Memo Ochoa to guard my girl’s DMs, thb. Nothing gets past him.

There’s always room to make fun of a old-school tradition, like baptisms.

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In the name of the father the son and a modelo. The way tios welcome newborns to the family. Where’s the lie?

We do get moments to see Ugly Primo straight chilling, like watching the World Cup.

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Unfortunately, his dreams of Mexico winning was destroyed and we’re afraid the community will never really recover. Hopefully Ugly Primo can bounce back from the defeat.

He even understands regular people’s lives, which is important to staying humble.

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Ugly Primo has been gaining fame with his little skits. Here he shows how the Fourth of July goes down in the hood and it’s too real.

We may never know what the real Ugly Primo looks like, but at least we have the puppet.

CREDIT: uglyprimo / Instagram

His puppet has taken on a life of it’s own. Make sure you keep up to see what shenanigans he gets himself into.

An Artist In Indiana Is Drawing Iconic Singers And Actors As Aztec Characters And It Is Amazing

Entertainment

An Artist In Indiana Is Drawing Iconic Singers And Actors As Aztec Characters And It Is Amazing

qetzaart / Instagram

For the last few years, Jorge Garza has been making a name for himself in the world of art with his Aztec-inspired drawings infused with pop culture figures. Garza’s Instagram page is a showcase of his unique work that includes illustrations of Latin figures like the Chapulín and luchador fighters. He goes by the artist name Quetza as a nod to his Aztec work that he’s heavily influenced by. 

Whether its the graphics, colors, and finishes in his work, Garza’s work is a testament to his knowledge and passion for Aztec art. His work showcases many sharp details and takes a classic process, from pencil sketches to digitization. While his style is varied in some ways from original Aztec style work he still includes details like the use of skulls, snakes, and details of Mexican culture. Garza also has his own online store where he showcases and sells many of his own original designs. Currently, he is working on an art book that will be focusing on his passion of Aztec/Pop Culture. 

While the Northwest Indiana artist has been around for quite some time, he might have gotten his biggest moment yet as his drawing of the “Queen of Tejano” got quite the attention online. Within hours of posting his “Aztec Selena” illustration on Facebook, the image was met with overwhelming attention from fans and strangers alike.  

Anytime you can pay tribute to the queen Selena you’re going to get love on social media.

Credit: qetzaart / Instagram

His Selena artwork was quickly shared and spread across social media with many in return getting to look at Garza’s overall portfolio of work. Upon first posting the sketch on Facebook Wednesday, Garza had no clue that it would receive more than 5,000 shares and well over 3,000 likes.

“I love Aztec artwork and its been a big influence in my work,” Garza told My San Antonio. “I respect Selena and the influence she has had on Mexican-American culture so I uploaded it … and I did not expect the feedback I had. It’s overwhelming.”

He says his viral drawing is a testament to the love and adoration that Selena fans still have even after all these years after her passing. Garza had planned to draw this specific piece for years and felt like now was the perfect time to put together this tribute to the “Como la Flor” singer. 

His collection of Aztec-inspired illustrations come from a special place in Garza’s heart. He grew up with a love for Mexican pre-Hispanic art that he learned about at a young age.

Credit: qetzaart / Instagram

As a young boy living in Indiana, Garza learned about Aztec culture and the complexity of the civilizations during that time period. But it was the artwork during that time that truly inspired him to become an artist. Since then, Garza has devoted himself to learning more about Aztec graphics and culture. 

While he gets inspiration from Aztec history, Garza has also thrown in a bit of his personal for pop culture into his artwork. Whether that’s including characters from X-Men, Batman, Marvel or Transformers, it’s his way of staying true to himself all while paying tribute to the past. 

Besides just illustrations, Garza has shown his versatility as an artist when he previously released a horror comic called Wrath of the Giver. He’s also put out a compilation book of Aztec art and pop culture with some of his best work so far. 

Fans of his work took to social media to share their appreciation for Garza’s latest illustration. 

Credit: @nate_sdsu / Twitter

Garza has proven to be an artistic inspiration to some on social media who are praising him for his work and his tribute to Latin art. There is a growing market for pop culture-inspired work like Garza’s all over the internet and with his latest piece blowing up we’re sure this isn’t the last time we see one of his pieces circulating on social media. 

For fans of Garza’s work, he’ll be at the Big Texas Comicon at the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center from Sept. 20-22. 

READ: 5 Years After They Went Missing, The Case Of The 43 Missing Ayotzinapa Students Is Nowhere Near Answered

This Exhibition In North Carolina Is Spotlighting The Work And Rocky Relationship Between Frida Kahlo And Diego Rivera

Entertainment

This Exhibition In North Carolina Is Spotlighting The Work And Rocky Relationship Between Frida Kahlo And Diego Rivera

An exhibition on the esteemed Mexican artists, lovers, and icons Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera is coming to North Carolina. On October 26, the North Carolina Museum of Art will open the Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, and Mexican Modernism from the Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection. The anticipated exhibition will include paintings, drawings, photography and film that aims to capture the 20th century artists’ bodies of work as well as their friendships and conflicts with political figures and their own impassioned and tumultuous personal relationships.

 

“Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, and Mexican Modernism from the Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection will emphasize a remarkable chapter in art history that is at once Mexican and global,” museum director Valerie Hillings told the ArtfixDaily, a publication covering curated art news.

Today, their tempestuous relationship is as famous as some of the artists’ most popular works. 

fridakahlo / Instagram

Kahlo and Rivera met in June 1928 at a party thrown by photographer Tina Modotti. At the time, a young, bold Kahlo asked Rivera to look at her paintings to see if he thought that she had enough talent to succeed. Rivera, impressed by her work, later spoke about that encounter, saying, “It was obvious to me that this girl was an authentic artist.” The pair soon started a relationship, though Rivera was 20 years older than Kahlo and already had two common-law wives. It was the start to a messy, atypical romance.

Marrying at a civil ceremony at the town hall of Coyoacán in 1929, despite the disapproval of Kahlo’s mother, their marriage included immense heartbreak. 

fridakahlo / Instagram

Over the years, the couple experienced and fought over everything from failed abortions and miscarriages to ailing physical health, to extra-marital affairs, including same-gender relationships from the gender-bending Kahlo. In 1939, the couple even divorced, only to remarry a year later with little change in their passionate yet rocky affair. Aside from the infidelity, rage, and distress that brewed in their personal relationship, the pair was often also at odds with political leaders as well. As communists, the revolutionary nature of Rivera’s murals, as well as Kahlo’s self-portraits and party affiliations, often put them at odds with political and religious leaders.

“Diego Rivera’s personality, politics, and monumental, social realist murals made him a celebrity during his lifetime. While he once overshadowed his equally talented wife, Frida Kahlo’s fame has far outstripped her husband’s in the years since her death,” Hillings added.

The pieces presented at the exhibition come from the long-time collection of Jacques and Natasha Gelman. According to ArtfixDaily, the Gelmans became Mexican citizens in 1942 and at the time started amassing Mexican art. Their collection includes Mexican modernists, like Kahlo and Rivera, who became friends with the Gelmans, as well as their compatriots Rufino Tamayo, David Alfaro Siqueiros and more. 

The exhibition was organized by the Vergel Foundation and MondoMostre in collaboration with the Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes y Literatura (INBAL). It is a joint project between the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources; the North Carolina Museum of Art Foundation, Inc.; and the William R. Kenan Jr. Endowment for Educational Exhibitions. It includes research from the Ann and Jim Goodnight/The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Fund for Curatorial and Conservation Research and Travel.

The North Carolina Museum of Art is presenting the exhibition alongside the Luces y Sombras: Images of Mexico | Photographs from the Bank of America Collection. 

Together, the fall exhibitions “celebrate these artists’ culture of origin as well as the diverse sources of influence they drew upon in creating their distinctive oeuvres,” Hillings said.

While the museum is commemorating the famed Mexican couple, not everyone is excited about the pair’s legacy. The fall exhibition comes weeks after the new U.S. ambassador to Mexico Christopher Landau criticized Kahlo for her support of Marxism, stirring controversy on social media. The ambassador, who was appointed by President Donald Trump and sworn in last month, took to Twitter last week after visiting the late Kahlo’s home, La Casa Azul, in Mexico City.

“I admire her free and bohemian spirit, and she rightly became an icon of Mexico around the whole world. What I do not understand is her obvious passion for Marxism, Leninism, Stalinism. Didn’t she know about the horrors committed in the name of that ideology?” he wrote in Spanish. 

His comments immediately drew backlash from thousands of people.

fridakahlo / Instagram

Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, and Mexican Modernism from the Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection runs at the North Carolina Museum of Art through January 19, 2020. To recognize the native language and cultural heritage of the artists in the exhibition, gallery information will be provided in both English and Spanish.

Tickets are already available for members but will be sold to nonmembers starting on September 17. 

Read: US Ambassador Insults Mexican Icon Frida Kahlo And Mexicans Clapped Back