Entertainment

Ugly Primo Is One Latino Artist Everyone Who Loves Pop Culture Should Know About

Ugly Primo is one artist you should definitely be following. He has taken so many Latino pop culture moments and turned them into art that’s just divine. You’ll never see his face because he hides behind a puppet as his persona, but it low key works with his art aesthetic. Check out some of his art below and prepare to bask in some great Latino pop art.

Ugly Primo is already rubbing elbows with some up and coming Latino stars.

uglyprimo / Instagram

Do you recognize this piece of art? It is Cuco’s EP cover for ’Chiquito’ illustrated by Ugly Primo. See. You already know his art and never knew it.

He’s even besties with the one and only Bad Bunny.

uglyprimo / Instagrams

Ugly Primo has created custom pieces for Cuco, Bad Bunny, and so many other artists in the music industry. It’s like they are all elevating each other because that’s how Latinos do.

But it isn’t all serious work. He will take all kinds of artistic liberty and it’s amazing.

uglyprimo / Instagram

Just when you thought Bad Bunny had secured his tough guy persona, this Easter bunny comes around. Like, talk about showing off a softer side.

Tbh, the #1 Daddy mug for Daddy Yankee is perfect.

uglyprimo / Instagram

A el le gusta el cafecito, dale más cafecito. Even with sunglasses on, Ugly Primo caught Daddy Yankee’s sweet twinkle in his eyes.

Literally taking Maluma Baby to the next level.

uglyprimo / Instagram

Who knew Maluma could be such a daddy while still single. One thing is for sure, that baby looks well taken care of.

You can’t forget the Caribbean icons that gave the U.S. a taste of Latin music.

uglyprimo / Instagram

And it’s even better that her face is on a bag of sugar. Maybe it is too cliché but it never gets old.

Elvis Crespo as fabric softener just makes sense.

uglyprimo / Instagram

I feel like dancing but at the same time smell Downy so strong that it’s like I am currently doing laundry. Suavemente lavame.

He’ll even help you profess your love for Cardi B.

uglyprimo / Instagram

Who isn’t in love with this rapper right now? We can only assume she has love and fan letters coming to her everyday.

A Latino pop culture collection isn’t complete with El Chacal.

uglyprimo / Instagram

If you don’t know who this is, fuera! This guy lived on everyones TV on Saturday nights. It’s actually strange not to see him on the TV when you are making and eating dinner.

Ugly Primo even perfectly captured our childhood terror with a simple image called “El Trio.”

uglyprimo / Instagram

Suddenly you hear, “Te calmas o te calmo.” Not only are you now scared, you are confused. Like, you’re grown, living on your own but you still know mami can find you.

Obviously, El Diablote makes an appearance because it’s an honest representation.

uglyprimo / Instagram

I don’t remember this card, but diablote sounds like an understatement. If you win would you say buenas or magas? Guess it depends on what you think of your family/community.

Oh yeah, he also invented Tapendejo.

uglyprimo / Instagram

The weakest hot sauce known to man. It’s for all the people who think they are big and bad but really just watered down excuses for human beings.

Speaking of things that don’t quite make sense…

uglyprimo / Instagram

Are people still doing this? We hope not but the imagery is too perfect a representation that you’ll cry from shame.

But we all know who the real hero is, El Chapulin Colorado.

uglyprimo / Instagram

More agile than a turtle, stronger than a mouse, more noble than a lettuce, his symbol is a heart. At least someone is holding it down for us.

You can never go wrong with depicting a celebratory Lionel Messi.

uglyprimo / Instagram

This will get you up off your feet and clapping with your tios and tias. It’s just impossible to hear that song and not clap along.

Guillermo Ochoa is one wall Trump doesn’t want to mess with.

uglyprimo / Instagram

Trump asked for a wall and Mexico gave him one. I need Memo Ochoa to guard my girl’s DMs, thb. Nothing gets past him.

There’s always room to make fun of a old-school tradition, like baptisms.

uglyprimo / Instagram

In the name of the father the son and a modelo. The way tios welcome newborns to the family. Where’s the lie?

We do get moments to see Ugly Primo straight chilling, like watching the World Cup.

uglyprimo / Instagram

Unfortunately, his dreams of Mexico winning was destroyed and we’re afraid the community will never really recover. Hopefully Ugly Primo can bounce back from the defeat.

He even understands regular people’s lives, which is important to staying humble.

uglyprimo / Instagram

Ugly Primo has been gaining fame with his little skits. Here he shows how the Fourth of July goes down in the hood and it’s too real.

We may never know what the real Ugly Primo looks like, but at least we have the puppet.

uglyprimo / Instagram

His puppet has taken on a life of it’s own. Make sure you keep up to see what shenanigans he gets himself into.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

These Terrariums And Fairy Gardens Are A Lil’ Homies Dream Come True

Culture

These Terrariums And Fairy Gardens Are A Lil’ Homies Dream Come True

Lil’ Homies are one toy that we all remember. They little figurines were so much more to us than little toys that we got from toy vending machines. Adrian Ortiz is using them to create something magical and giving people a non-Eurocentric take on terrariums.

Adrian Ortiz is giving Lil’ Homies their own terrariums in which to flourish.

Ortiz understands the cultural importance of Lil’ Homies because it was one of the first times he saw himself represented, like so many of us. The toys were a welcomed moment of representation for Ortiz after spending so many years seeing so many white narratives in the media and toys.

“I started making terrariums with Lil’ Homies in them as the figures because I noticed how traditional fairy gardens were always representing white/European figures,” Ortiz told mitú. “I thought about how perfect they were in size. I wanted to dedicate my art page to the idea of people of color existing and participating in nature.”

Ortiz feels supported from his followers as well as his boyfriend. His art has been a welcomed breath of culturally relevant plant art in people’s social media feeds.

The ongoing pandemic gave Ortiz a chance to dive deeper into a hobby he already had: plants.

“I have always been into plants and nature since I was a kid and I began making terrariums and fairy gardens in the past year to deal with the pandemic like so many others,” Ortiz says. “There is something super special about making miniature tiny living worlds. I wanted to make fairy gardens but I ended up with something halfway between terrariums and fairy gardens but with cholos. So I created the ‘Brown People Indoor Miniature Gardening TikTok’ series on my tik tok account.”

Ortiz’s TikTok account, aptly named @botanical_homie, has more than 7,000 followers showing that people are really into the idea of Lil’ Homies living their fairy garden dreams.

The terrariums are another chance for people of color to be represented in the world.

Ortiz was in an arts school for middle and high school. In that time, the school fostered an understanding of racial injustices and introduced Ortiz to the concept of artivism, art as activism. It was, according to Ortiz, a moment when he realized that he wanted to dedicate his art to BIPOC.

“I grew up and live in Colorado and have seen the lack of access BIPOC have to outdoor activities like hiking and mountain climbing,” Ortiz explains. “These are white-dominated sports and activities that some POC never get to experience. I want to create a world where we can be anything and do everything, even if it’s miniature. A utopia for us to take back what is also ours.”

Ortiz is making the terrariums for everyone, even people who struggle to take care of plants.

Covid quarantining has forced so many people to think they make perfect plant parents. Yet, taking care of plants is something that doesn’t com naturally. Ortiz had to spend time trying to figure out what plants are the best for everyone.

“Part of my challenge in creating these terrariums has been figuring out what kind of plants people can keep alive. They all have different requirements so getting plants should always depend on your space and lighting,” Ortiz says. “I come from the generation of YouTube so I always say do research, it’s part of the fun. The biggest thing about having plants that people don’t realize is that you just have to pay attention to them, often. But again it depends, some plants are indestructible.”

Ortiz is happy to be able to create this art and hopes to make them more accessible.

“If you want to support me and my art work you can contact me via Instagram about commissions,” Ortiz says. “Shipping these pieces is not easy or ideal so I appreciate everyone’s patience as I learn and evolve. My goal is to work on larger installations and I’ll be putting out DIY kits in the near future.”

READ: If You Call Yourself A Frida Kahlo Fan Then You Should Be Following These Five Artists

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

The Pink Seesaws Along The U.S.-Mexico Border Won Design of the Year For 2020

Things That Matter

The Pink Seesaws Along The U.S.-Mexico Border Won Design of the Year For 2020

For many years now, when you think of the U.S.-Mexico border, you think of the families torn apart by cruel and inhumane immigration policies and of kids and families being thrown into cages.

One artist tried to highlight the cruelty happening at the border, while also providing local children with a happy distraction, through an art installation at the border zone between El Paso, TX and Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua.

Now, that art installation is gaining international recognition for its aim to bring together a physically divided community.

Pink seesaws installed along the U.S.-Mexico border have won a prestigious design award.

The collection of bright pink seesaws placed along the border wall between a section of El Paso and Ciudad Juárez is being recognized for its importance. The art installation/children’s playground that allowed people to interact through the border wall has won the prestigious Design of the Year award, with its creators saying they hoped the work encourages people to build bridges between communities.

The Teeter Totter Wall, which bridged across El Paso in Texas and Ciudad Juárez in Chihuahua during a 40-minute session, was described as not only feeling “symbolically important” but also highlighting “the possibility of things” by the judging panel.

Original story published July, 25, 2019:

Lately, when you think of the U.S-Mexico border, you think of the children being kept in cages, of migrant folks being kept in unthinkable conditions in detention prisons, and you think of the possible construction of Donald Trump’s beloved wall–among other negative connotations that the border brings. Then there are times when heartwarming images and scenes from the border show that despite the weaponization of the border, we’re still connected to one another in many ways. 

Architect and artist Ronald Rael designed and installed pink seesaws at the border for children from the United States and Mexico to play together.

The art installation, “Teeter-Totter Wall,” was created by Rael, an architecture professor at the University of California, Berkeley, and Virginia San Fratello, an associate professor of design at San Jose State University.

The custom-built seesaws were placed on both sides of the steel border fence that separates the U.S. and Mexico. The artist called it “one of the most incredible experiences of his career” in a post he shared on Instagram. 

About a decade ago, both Rael and San Fratello had designed the concept for the seesaw at the border for a book titled “Borderwall as Architecture.” Now, the drawings became a reality. 

Despite the negative headlines that dominate the news cycle every day, it’s refreshing to see artists like Ronald Rael use their platform and creativity to spark positivity and strengthen our sense of community. 

“The wall became a literal fulcrum for U.S.-Mexico relations and children and adults were connected in meaningful ways on both sides with the recognition that the actions that take place on one side have a direct consequence on the other side,” Rael wrote in his Instagram caption. Rael also gave a shoutout to the team who helped make this powerful art installation a reality in Cuidad Juárez, Mexico.

CNN also points out that the New Mexico town is also where a militia detained migrants in April (the ACLU called it a kidnapping), and where a private group began building its own border wall with the use of millions donated to a GoFundMe campaign. 

Last week, the Supreme Court also gave Trump a victory in his fight for the construction of a wall along the border. Further, the Supreme Court allowed the administration to use $2.5 billion in military funds for it. 

Despite all of the negative news surrounding the border, it was a different scene there on Monday near the Sunland Park stretch. Instead, it showed a heartwarming and lighter scene compared to what we’ve recently seen.

The art installation that this artist created is also meant to serve as a reminder. A reminder that “we are connected” and “what happens on one side impacts the other.”

The pink seesaws showed people from both sides of the border coming together in a unifying act. Children and adults alike on U.S soil were recorded playing with children from the other side. These light-hearted scenes from the border make one for if only a second forget the actual reality of it all. 

RAICES, a non-profit focusing on immigration legal services in Texas, shared on Twitter that “Art is such a powerful vehicle for change”

In the past, other scenes of art installations at the border have made rounds. For example, The Guardian notes the time when an architectural practice in Mexico designed a pink interpretation of Trump’s border wall. 

Claudia Tristán, the Director of Latinx Messaging for 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke also praised the art installation for the message it spread. 

“The symbolism of the seesaw is just magical,” she wrote in a tweet. “A #Border fence will not keep us from our neighbors.”

The video of architect and artist Ronald Rael that’s also making rounds on social media shows him saying that the seesaw that there are still “good relations the people of Mexico and the United States.” Therefore, the seesaw can portray that we are “equal” and the wall, he says, cuts those relationships between us. 

Ultimately, it is important to remember that with or without the U.S.-Mexico border, much of this land belonged to and will always belong to Native Americans.

We need to remember that the homelands of tribes including the Kumeyaay, Pai, Cocopah, O’odham, Yaqui, Apache and Kickapoo peoples were all split into two by the 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo and the 1853 Gadsen Purchase–which is what makes up modern-day California, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas

So while it is important to highlight the positive and humanizing images on the U.S.-Mexico border when we can, we should also be mindful of the indigenous communities to which this land belongs to. 

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com