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13 Airbnb Treehouses & Bungalows For Your Next Trip To Latin America

Having a slumber party in a treehouse may sound like an activity for only kids, but Airbnb has made this accessible to adults too. From treehouses to cozy bungalows, here are some Airbnb homes across Latin America that will put you right in the middle of nature.

1. Sacred Geome Treehouse

CREDIT: Joseph / Airbnb / Digital Image / April 18, 2018

This treehouse is located in Montezuma, Costa Rica. The geometric shaped treehouse can be booked for only $72 per night, offering one bedroom and one and a half baths. If you’re looking for a relaxing escape from technology and the city, this is definitely the place to be.

2. Treehouse, Manuel Antonio

CREDIT: Thomas + Lili / Airbnb / Digital Image / April 18, 2018

This treehouse is also located in Costa Rica, but in a different city named Quepos. In this treehouse you get a view of the rainforest and all of the wildlife that comes with it, including monkeys, sloths and all sorts of birds. So if you’re an animal lover, you can book this Airbnb treehouse for only $52 per night.

3. Ocean View Luxury Treehouse Loft

CREDIT: Justin / Airbnb / Digital Image / April 18, 2018

This treehouse loft is located in Esterillos Oeste, Costa Rica and can be reserved for only $58 a night. At walking distance from the beach, this loft offers one bedroom, one bath and a large outdoor canopy. The best feature, however, is the view of the sunset that you get along the Pacific Coast.

4. La Jungla Bungalows – Sulawesi

CREDIT: Amy & Morongo / Airbnb / Digital Image / April 18, 2018

This treehouse-style bungalow is located in Mompiche, Ecuador and you can book it for $26 per night. Since Mompiche is such a tiny village, there is no hot water running, however, the tropical weather makes up for it.

5. Hacienda Chan Chan – Farm Bungalow

CREDIT: Hacienda / Airbnb / Digital Image / April 18, 2018

Also located in Ecuador, this wooden bungalow lies in the city of Chiquintad, a dairy farm by the mountains. And since this Airbnb is located in a dairy farm, the home offers complimentary yogurt, fruit and bread, all made fresh in the farm.

6. Dome Room in the Sacred Valley

CREDIT: Milagros Y Diego / Airbnb / Digital Image / April 18, 2018

Located in Písac, Ecuador, this dome-like bungalow offers one bedroom and one bath, along with spectacular views of the gardens and mountains that surround it. The Airbnb can be reserved for the small cost of $32 per night.

7. Eco Treehouse, Free Breakfast Included

CREDIT: Checkin Bocas / Airbnb / Digital Image / April 18, 2018

This jungle house is located in Bastimento, Panama and be booked for $85 per night. In addition to the sights and sounds of the wildlife that surround the treehouse, you also get a beautiful view of the ocean.

8. Beach House in the Trees – Close to Town!

CREDIT: Chris / Airbnb / Digital Image / April 18, 2018

Located in Utila, Honduras, this Airbnb treehouse gives you a spot-on view of the Caribbean ocean. And with the ocean so close, you are able to take advantage of water activities such as snorkeling.

The cost of this Airbnb is $49 per night.

9. El Nido – Treehouse – The Nest

CREDIT: Martin / Airbnb / Digital Image / April 18, 2018

This cozy treehouse is located in Colonia del Sacramento, Uruguay. For a total of $79 per night, this Airbnb home gives you access to swings, hammocks and a pool.

10. Whimsical Treehouse on Cacao Farm in Dolphin Bay

CREDIT: Dorien & Papito / Airbnb / Digital Image / April 18, 2018

This treehouse is located in Dolphin Bay on the island San Cristobal. If you’re interested in getting a view of dolphins, monkeys and sloths, this is the place to be. And you can reserve the home for only $60 per night.

11. The Potoo Tree House – Private 1 Bedroom Villa

CREDIT: Alexander / Airbnb / Digital Image / April 18, 2018

This antique treehouse is located in Dominical, Costa Rica. As you can somewhat notice from the image above, this treehouse is entirely surrounded by the jungle, specifically 1,000 acres of jungle. I know, breathtaking!!

12. The Bird Tower, Nature Lovers Dream

CREDIT: Eric And Nick / Airbnb / Digital Image / April 18, 2018

This treehouse is located in Mindo, Ecuador, in the middle of the Cloud Forest. If you’re a nature photographer looking for a new setting, this is the place to visit next. You can book the Airbnb for a total of $80 per night.

13. The Treehouse at Casa Motmot

CREDIT: Anne / Airbnb / Digital Image / April 18, 2018

This bamboo-framed treehouse is located in San Pedro La Laguna, Guatemala. The Guatemalan paradise property offers one bedroom, one bath, and a beautiful view of the forest and lake. You can reserve this Airbnb for only $35 per night.

So, which treehouse or bungalow will you be staying at next? 


READ: Can You Guess These Latino Countries From Their Flags?


Which Airbnb do you like best? Tell us in the comments and hit the share button below!

An American Died In The Dominican Republic In March But The Death Was Ignored And Treated As Natural Causes

Things That Matter

An American Died In The Dominican Republic In March But The Death Was Ignored And Treated As Natural Causes

Justin Aikin / Unsplash

More Americans have died while on vacation in the Dominican Republic. News agencies have been reporting on the increasing number of American deaths in the Dominican Republic and now one more death has come forward from March after being ignored.

A Georgia man’s death and under investigation months after dying in the Dominican Republic.

Credit: @LaurenPozenWSB / Twitter

Tracy Jerome Jester Jr., of Forsyth County, Georgia died in March while vacationing in the Dominican Republic with his sister. Allegedly, Jester started to complain of not being able to breathe after a day of sightseeing with his sister.

Jester Jr.’s mother told ABC News that his death certificate references “respiratory illness” as the cause of death.

Credit: @ABC7Chicago / Twitter

Jester Jr.’s mom told ABC News that he did have lupus. Yet, the man’s mother remembers her son telling her about a “nasty” Sprite he drank in the Caribbean country shortly before his death.

According to ABC7, Jester’s mother got a call from her son the night before his death and he told her about his activities, including the questionable taste of the soft drink he purchased at the hotel. While she told him that it might be a different flavor in the country, he insisted that something was odd about the drink.

At 4:40 a.m., she got a call from her daughter and the conversation was troubling.

Credit: @jockosims / Twitter

At this point, Jester Jr. was vomiting blood and telling his sister that he wasn’t able to breathe. Their mother instructed her daughter to call emergency services but there was a delay in someone assisting, according to ABC7.

There was no toxicology performed because of when the young man died in connection to the increase in tourist deaths.

It wasn’t until there was increased media attention to the deaths and three deaths at one hotel that toxicology screenings started to happen. So far, the FBI is performing toxicology screenings on the three victims from the same hotel.

Officials in both the U.S. and the Dominican Republic claim that there has been no significant increase in deaths.

Credit: @ulisesjorge / Twitter

People are trying to calm down the fears of everyone talking about the deaths in the Dominican Republic. While it is not abnormal for tourists to die while on vacation, the deaths of those in the Dominican Republic have left Americans stunned.

READ: Dominicans Are Taking To Social Media To Make Sure That People Stop Trying To Cancel The Dominican Republic

Cancun’s Scary Global Warming Problem Could Definitely Be A Lot More Lethal Than ‘GOT’ Villains If We Don’t Combat It Now

Culture

Cancun’s Scary Global Warming Problem Could Definitely Be A Lot More Lethal Than ‘GOT’ Villains If We Don’t Combat It Now

@newsnest00 / Twitter

For the past several years, Cancun has notoriously become one of The Summer Spots. With promises of cheap beer, crystal clear surf and fun hangs, tourists typically flock to the vacation destination for good times in the spring and summer in troves. The location’s sands, beaches, and resorts are typically packed by this time of year, but a nasty visitor is washing up on the shores of these beaches, scaring off the usual summertime travel industry.

For the past several months, an invasion of seaweed-like algae hasn’t been just an eyesore for tourists, it’s also been a nasal deterrent.

Hundreds of pounds of seaweed-like algae is washing up on the shores of Cancun and it’s ruining the city’s tourist season.

Twitter / @tictoc

The past several months, the sunny resort town has been inundated with slimy, brown seaweed-like algae. It’s name is sargassum and it has washed up all along the coast around Cancun; stretching all the way down to Playa del Carmen and even further to Tulum. With the stench of rotten eggs, the algae smells just as gross as it looks and makes for a pretty unappealing soggy mess. It’s definitely not the sort of beach conditions that encourage tourists to visit.

Though Cancun businesses are feeling the effects of this invasion, the president of Mexico isn’t as concerned. President Andrés Manuel López Obrador has reportedly called the problem controllable and has only allocated 2.6 Million for the removal of the algae. The removal is a slow process — being shoveled away by city workers — but the lack of resources makes the task even more difficult. Also, the endless onslaught of fresh algae with every tide doesn’t help. Even using front loaders and trucks for the cleanup, the work takes several hours and results in an algae-covered beach only moments later.

Officials aren’t certain what the cause of this algae is but there are clues that point to it being caused by major global issues.

Twitter / @DKaimowitz

Scientists have suggested that the increase in algae is caused by the warming of our Earth because of the global climate change we are currently experiencing. This is the same hypothesis that has been suggested to explain Florida’s Red Tide. Earlier this month, scientists at the University of South Florida used satellite imaging to discover the largest bloom of the algae in the world. It’s being called the Great Atlantic Sargassum Belt and it is impacting beaches along North, Central, and South America.

Others believe that deforestation is to blame for the assault of algae on these beaches. Due to the logging and increased use of herbicide and fertilizers by Brazilian lumber companies in the Amazon forest, dangerous runoff flows into the ocean. The nutrients in these fertilizers encourage the growth of the algae; causing super blooms to occur.

In a release about a study of these super blooms, Dr. Chuanmin Hu of the USF College of Marine Science expressed concern about the state of the Atlantic ocean. He has predicted that:

“The ocean’s chemistry must have changed in order for the blooms to get so out of hand.”

Regardless of what the Mexican president and scientists say, locals who face this problem every day are the ones most impacted by the algae.

Twitter / @newsnest00

Tourism in the community has taken a major hit during a time when Mexico is already heading towards a recession. The first three weeks of June, hotel occupancy in the area dropped by 3.4%. Air travel to the city also saw numbers that aren’t as optimistic as Cancun usually sees during this time of year. It only claimed 1.2%, the smallest amount of growth that the area has seen since 2011.

It isn’t just the international travel industry that loses money to the algae. In a city like Cancun, as much as 40% of jobs are tied to tourism alone. Events like this — that impact the beaches so severely — threaten the livelihood of locals. The Mexican transportation industry, local artisans, restaurants, beach resorts, and sight-seeing locations depend on this busy season to provide the bulk of their yearly income. In order to lure travelers, hotels in the area are even running specials. In many places in Cancun, tourists can get as much as 20% off rooms and free transportation to unaffected beaches.

Cleaning up after this mess will take a lot more than a few hundred shovels.

Twitter / @ElCanaco

Reversing the effects of climate change can not really be accomplished on an individual level. Realistically, a single person does not cause this damage. Instead, it is large conglomerations that hurt our Earth with their anti-environmental policies. Until the governments of the world decide to hold these companies accountable, nothing productive will be done to stop this damage.

Right now, we’re seeing this onslaught of algae but who knows what is in store for our environment if we don’t make major improvements soon. It’s more than just our Cancun vacations that are counting on these changes.

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