entertainment

This Music Video Battles Against A Latino Tradition That Almost Every Woman Has To Deal With

Credit: @BeckyGVEVO / Youtube

Becky G’s single, “Todo Cambio,” shows us a part of the Latino culture that many families tend to overemphasize, and that is: marriage. The older you get, the more your family members seem to bring it up in conversations – from little comments like, “y el novio?” to “with that attitude you’re never going to get married.” It’s almost as if you should feel guilty for being single. But Becky G is reminding us that self-love comes first.

Here are three messages in Becky G’s track “Todo Cambio”:

1. Never settle for anything if you’re not truly happy.

Screen Shot 2017-03-02 at 1.45.53 PMScreen Shot 2017-03-02 at 2.27.09 PM
CREDIT: BECKYGVEVO / YOUTUBE

In many families being single when you’re in your twenties is often looked down upon because it goes against tradition and can be considered selfish. (How dare you not give your mom grandchildren when you’re juggling school a career and many other things, right?! ?) And that is exactly what this music video is challenging.

Becky G accepts her boyfriend’s because she sees how ecstatic her parents are when her boyfriend pops the question.

2. Don’t be afraid to go against your family’s wishes and expectations, even if it disappoints them.

Screen Shot 2017-03-02 at 2.28.45 PM Screen Shot 2017-03-02 at 2.29.15 PM
CREDIT: BECKYGVEVO / YOUTUBE

Even in real life Becky G knows the importance of family. We see how close she is with her family and how much they mean to her.

Still in this video, she messages the importance of making yourself happy before anything else – even if it means not following the exact plans your family had for you.

3. Just do you, boo. ?

Screen Shot 2017-03-02 at 2.31.22 PM
CREDIT: BECKYGVEVO / YOUTUBE

Remember that it’s fine to date around, have fun, follow your passion, and not feel obligated to settling down and getting married.

Yes, it might come as a huge culture shock to your family, but if they want you to be happy, they will support you.

Check out the full music video below:


Get it Beckyyyy! ??


READ: Hold the Diamond Ring – Here’s Why I’d Never Marry in My 20s


Can you relate to this music video? Comment and hit the share button below!

Forgiving Your Cuñada Is Good For Your Health

Culture

Forgiving Your Cuñada Is Good For Your Health

I suppose it’s not that uncommon, but my cuñada didn’t like me much for many years.

“Nice to meet you,” she said, in clipped and heavily accented English the first time we met. She shook my hand taking it away quickly and barely made eye-contact, but I knew she didn’t approve of my short hair, my tattoos, or the fact that I was third-generation Mexican-American. If I had been someone else entirely, she probably would have found other things to hate about her too. My cuñada had left Mexico by herself. From what I know now, there were some dark reasons that she had to leave. It took her two tries to cross in Tijuana, but she made it all on her own, knowing that her brother would pick her up in Los Angeles, show her the way in the Bay Area, and support her financially for as long as was necessary.

She must have felt that my relationship with her brother was a threat.

When we first met, I was visiting the apartment that they shared then. We hadn’t been dating long, but things had gotten serious fast on account of our ages and his immigration status. I was 28 and he was 33.

“She’s just one of those women who doesn’t like other women very much,” my marido explained.

I hated those kinds of women. He squeezed my hand on our way down the stairs of his apartment on our way to eat. We always went out to eat those days. I could see the spring light shining through the large glass-front apartment door. Everything was shiny, new, and bright then, except for this one thing; this relationship with my cuñada.

I was pretty much the opposite of my cuñada. I was American-born, raised by women, had been in a band with women, and was about to start attending Mills College, a private women’s college in Oakland. I defaulted to hating or distrusting men and liking women, feeling a kinship through our shared inequality in a male-dominated world. But for months and months, maybe years, when I’d see her, my cuñada would attempt a smile and say, “Hola, Morena,” her lip sneering as it rolled over the ‘r’ in my family nickname, Morena. 

Still, I had vowed to not default to hate her just because she was a woman who didn’t get along with women, or because she was my sister-in-law.

I wasn’t going to compete with her or play into the catty-woman stereotype, and I was going to be kind and compassionate to her no matter what.

She made this very difficult.

When we first met, my cuñada had been living in the US for three years already, but she spoke very little English. I was surprised by how little English she spoke. She was surprised that I spoke very little Spanish.

“Hay muchos Mexicanos que no pueden hablar español.”

She said it a few months after my marido and I were married. She said it not to me, but to a friend who was bilingual, perhaps thinking that I wouldn’t understand her.  Then she said it again to another friend. I took a deep breath and reminded myself that I promised not to participate in the catty-woman stuff or be passive-aggressive or hate a family member. I made myself another promise – to be kind and compassionate no matter what, but not to take her shit either.

I knew, though, that this one slight was so personal that it was going to be hard to forgive.

My marido got into bed first that night. I put on my nightgown, and sat down on my side.

“Hey, you need to have a talk with her sister ‘cause if you don’t do it. I’m going to have to do it.”

He looked up. “About what?”

“About what she said.”

“What did she say?”

I put my hand on my hip and did my best imitation, “Hay muchos Mexicanos que no pueden hablar español.”

“Oh, that.” He made a face.

“You better talk to her because if I have to do it, by the time I’m finished with her, she will be so embarrassed that she has been in the US for three years and doesn’t speak English that she will never want to speak it. That’s what’s going to happen.”

It wasn’t my finest moment.

“Okay,” he said, “I’ll talk to her.”

He never told me how the talk went, and I never asked because I didn’t need the argüende and because she never said it again. Within a year, she made us the padrinos of her first born, but I knew that I was only the madrina because I was la esposa de su hermano.

Photo provided by Michelle Cruz Gonzales

I still get a flash of anger when I think about her “hay muchos Mexicanos” comment, or the time she wouldn’t get out of the car to come and see our new house, or all the times I saw her roll her eyes and sneer at me, but I’m older than she is, and committed to supporting women, so I just waited her out. I took my ajihada on weekends to give my cuñados a break, made sure to remember my cuñadas birthday, participated in their extended family’s parties, even when I didn’t want to, and tried to forgive and not hold it against her when they had to miss our son’s birthday parties, prioritizing her marido’s large family’s numerous gatherings over ours.

Slowly but surely over the years, the ice began to thaw between us. My warmth, no matter how awkward and forced, combined with time and maturity, on all our parts, has allowed something new to develop, something real. And it’s good that I worked hard not to hold grudges and forgave what I perceived as slights because learning to forgive is good for our health. It can lower blood pressure, risk of heart attacks, cholesterol, and forgiveness can help improve sleep.

“Hi, Morena,” she smiles when she sees me now (which seems like all the time), and hugs me tight, and dumps a pile of food she brought, leftovers from the Philipino restaurant where she works, or un bote de frijoles that she made at her place and brought with her, a whole packet of corn tortillas, the family-size packet, and cans of soda in any flavor anyone in the house might drink. The other night she brought me a bottle of my favorite wine, and I shared it with her because that’s what cuñadas do. That’s what we’re supposed to do.

The Music Video For New Shawn Mendes And Camila Cabello Hit ‘Senorita’ Is Pure Fire And No Wonder Fans Think Theyre A Couple Like OMG

Entertainment

The Music Video For New Shawn Mendes And Camila Cabello Hit ‘Senorita’ Is Pure Fire And No Wonder Fans Think Theyre A Couple Like OMG

camila cabello / YouTube

There is one thing in music that is not up for debate: the Camilizer fandom is one of the strongest. No matter what the pop star is doing, her fans will always show up with full support on social media and irl. That fandom is making power moves again now that Cabello’s new collab “Señorita” with Shawn Mendes is out. In less than 24 hours, the video already had 14 million views.

Camila Cabello got her fandom ready with one tweet and it worked.

Credit: @Camila_Cabello / Twitter

Cabello’s Twitter is a powerful tool. When she tweets, her millions of followers listen. It is clear that she has learned how to harness social media for the betterment of her career and it is paying off. Tbh, she kind of deserves the success she has garnered so far. Like, she skipped her quinces so she could audition for the X Factor and the rest is music history.

Cabello stans are here to tell you that “Señorita” is a song that is here to stay.

Credit: @joyfulseavey / Twitter

No one is surprised to hear that Cabello was able to put out a hit. She is proving herself as a powerful musician. We still can’t get “Havana” out of our heads and it has been out for two years.

Like, this is what the Camilizer fandom is doing the rest of the weekend with this song in the background.

Low key, a lot of people will be giving this song all of their streams this weekend. Who wouldn’t want to spend the next couple days bouncing to this song?

People are crying over the new song because they have been waiting for new music.

Credit: @InZaynFor5H / Twitter

Take some deep breaths and relax. You don’t want to miss any of the music or video because you can’t see or hear over your own sobs. Is it even worth listening if you are crying so intensely?

Fans had theories about how the singers prepared for their intimate moments on screen.

Credit: @ShawnMendes / Twitter

Obviously, you wouldn’t want to have bad breath when you have to kiss someone over and over again. It is also kind of cute that Mendes was so concerned that he ate mints to make sure he had good breath for Cabello.

The video and the passion between the singers is reigniting speculation that they are secretly more than friends.

Credit: @_emgm_ / Twitter

Some people might call it good acting and on-screen chemistry. Camilizers call it them sharing their truth while hiding behind the facade of music and the arts. Whichever it is, they know how to make a convincing couple on the screen.

Here is the full video for Camila Cabello and Shawn Mendes’s “Señorita.”

Congrats, you two. Seems like you really did the thing with this video.

Paid Promoted Stories