Entertainment

This Is What A Selena Classic Looks Like When You Remix It With a Rapper And Two Singers

Credit: PlayNSkillzMusic / Youtube

After the original music video for Play-N-Skillz “Si Una Vez” released that was sleek, professionally shot and got millions of views on Youtube, a new lyric video popped up this week that is a lot more laid back, and features Becky G and Kap G. Word up, my G. There’s something dope about seeing these artists looking chill and enjoying themselves, intercut with their fans dancing and singing, too.

Becky G took part in the remix of Play-N-Skillz “Si Una Vez” supplying her own selfie-vid for the lyric video.

She killed it!

This Spanglish version of the song released back in February shortly after the original version with Winsin and Leslie Grace, but it didn’t seem like there were plans originally to release a full video. The video comes as a pleasant surprise, with everyone looking like they’re kicking it at home and recording bits and pieces on their phones. The fans really do make the video special as they’re dancing and singing their hearts out. This Spanglish version of “Si Una Vez” is a remix, and a bit of a tribute, to Selena’s original song by the same name.

Folks on Twitter were making sure to remind us all that Selena was the OG behind this song.

Serious fans were suspicious about letting Selena’s name be tarnished.

Other’s thought only parts of it were good.

Selena’s fans are very protective of her legacy.

Some fans sent in clips for the lyric video and weren’t notified that they were put in the final cut. They were freaking out.

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What did you think about the different versions of the song?


Check out the original song and music video by Play-N-Skillz ft. Winsin and Leslie Grace here.

[H/T] Watch Becky G, Kap G & More Sing Along With Fans in ‘Si Una Vez’ Lyric Video

READ: Play-N-Skillz Got Leslie Grace, Frankie J And Wisin To Cover Selena’s ‘Si Una Vez’ And It’s Everything


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People On Social Media Criticized Becky G For Allegedly Stealing The Name Of Her New Makeup Line

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People On Social Media Criticized Becky G For Allegedly Stealing The Name Of Her New Makeup Line

Becky G has released her second line of cosmetics with ColourPop Thursday and another brand by the same name claims the artist stole its intellectual property. “Chiquita pero chingona!” the cruelty-free Becky G line advertises, saying “Becky G did it again with the realest collection yet, inspired by her roots and her parent’s love story.” Meanwhile, Hola Chola Inc., founded by Susana Gonzalez, sells clothing and accessories that commemorate the same 1990’s Mexican-American Chola culture that Becky G’s collection tributes. Complete with La Virgencita denim jackets and “Hola Chola” jewelry and accessories, Gonzalez even once met with Becky G’s team to discuss a collaboration. When Hola Chola Inc.’s followers saw Becky G’s collection, they called out Becky G for ripping Gonzalez off. The LA-based indie company began calling on fans to spread the word to their friends not to support Becky G’s collection. 

Eventually, Becky G and the Hola Chola Inc. founder spoke on the phone and deleted all the negative content, but people are still dissatisfied.

“Hola Chola is something that I say literally every single day,” Becky G says in her video campaign.

CREDIT: @IAMBECKYG / TWITTER

“When I wake up early in the morning, at 6 am, for hair and makeup call time, and I open the door and I’m like, “Hola Chola!” That’s just what we do,” Becky G adds in her campaign, citing “chola” as something that means strength and confidence. “The word ‘chola’, when you think of a ‘chola’, it can be, I think, whatever you want it to be. Obviously, it carries a lot of weight, too. It’s definitely a lifestyle more than it is just a ‘style’,” Becky G elaborates in her video. “There’s so much inspiration behind this collection for me!” Becky G posted to Instagram. “The biggest ones being my mom’s styles & influences that have been passed on to me and the boss ladies I’m surrounded by every day,” she added. According to Becky G herself, all the “inspiration” is “straight from my mom’s closet in high school in the 90s and my older cousins who would dress me up like them in the early 2000s 🖤” 

Becky G’s mother is a crucial element of her beauty campaign and even makes an appearance in the promo video. The two even collaborated on ideas together. “To me, the name chola just means a strong woman. It doesn’t mean necessarily tied up to anything bad, other than they were strong. They were down. They were, like, real,” Becky G’s mom says in the video promo. “We love the name chola.”

Hola Chola Inc. claims that, because Becky G’s team was aware of the brand, it’s intellectual property theft.

CREDIT: @HOLACHOLAINC / INSTAGRAM

Gonzalez says she sat down with Becky G’s team at one point to discuss a collab, and had sent Becky G a La Virgencita denim jacket. “I’m so enraged,” an Hola Chola Inc. model posted to Instagram. “Out of all the names in the world you had to go with one that already exists? One that YOU know about @iambeckyg. The industry has never been fair but it just sucks to see shit like this happen from our own people. Make sure to keep tagging the real OG HOLA CHOLA under their posts.” 

Apparently, @HolaCholaInc unfollowed Becky G after the backlash. Later, Becky G and Gonzalez spoke over the phone, and Becky G shared to her Instagram story that the two had cleared things up. Soon after, @HolaCholaInc refollowed Becky G and deleted all the negative criticism for the beauty brand.

Others aren’t buying it.

CREDIT: @IAMBECKYG / TWITTER

When one Instagram user posited that Hola Chola Inc’s outrage was misplaced, the response was less-than-direct. “OK, but where’s the makeup YOU sale…I’m sure you didn’t inspire it with the sweater you make …” asked Instagram user @issamerickyy. “Huh?! You have to much time on your hands kid, go read a book!” Hola Chola Inc. responded, ironically with her own grammar mistakes given her “go read a book” jab.

I see no similarity aside from the term and cultural aspect..,” chimed in one Twitter Latina. “I was expecting to see a like-minded cosmetics brand.. but they sell clothing, just under the same phrase (which was used widely by all of us Latinas for over a decade.) Pump the breaks.”

What do you think? Was the backlash warranted?

READ: Becky G Gets Called Out For Cultural Appropriation And Latinx Twitter Users Have Thoughts

Becky G Gets Called Out For Cultural Appropriation And Latinx Twitter Users Have Thoughts

Entertainment

Becky G Gets Called Out For Cultural Appropriation And Latinx Twitter Users Have Thoughts

The hashtag #HowDoMexicansTalk is trending on Twitter as social media users squabble about Becky G and J-Hope’s new song “Chicken Noodle Soup”. The trilingual song —an homage to the early 2000’s hit by DJ Webstar and Young B (who now goes by Bianca Bonnie), featuring AG aka The Voice of Harlem— sent Twitter into a frenzied debate on cultural appropriation and whether or not Becky G is putting on a ‘blaccent’.

The “Chicken Noodle Soup” remake sparked a heated conversation around cultural appropriation on Twitter, and the Latinx community had stuff to say. 

The much-anticipated collab between Becky G and K-pop singer J-Hope, resulted in a big Billboard Social 50 gain for Becky and has racked up over 50 million views in just 5 days. The 2006 hit remake even started a whole dance challenge after J-Hope shared a video of himself recreating the choreography on TikTok, millions of fans followed suit, posting their own videos with the hashtag #CNSChallenge. But the new “Chicken Noodle Soup” also sparked a heated conversation on cultural appropriation in the Latinx community online.

It’s not the first time BTS’ J-Hope is involved in a debate about appropriating other cultures.

credit instagram @bts_jhope

J-Hope himself has been the subject of criticism for cultural appropriation around one of the hairstyles he sported towards the end of the video. In most of the video of “Chicken Noodle Soup”, J-Hope rocks his natural hair with blonde highlights, but during the second half, he wears a twisted hairstyle that many believe resembled dreadlocks. It’s not the first time the BTS star finds himself involved in debates of this nature —especially given K-pop’s already fraught history with appropriating black culture. 

One twitter used called the song “anti-black” and accused Becky G of using a ‘blaccent’.

credit twitter @rudeboiluna

On this occasion however, the subject of debate and heated comments was ‘Sin Pijama’ singer Becky G. One outspoken account on black Latinx issues called the song “anti-black” and accused the Mexican-American singer of using a “Caribbean blaccent.” “La Mala” or @rudeboiluna, questioned Becky G’s Spanish accent in a tweet that went viral: “Non-black people of color cannot survive without appropriating black diaspora,” she wrote.

Other twitter users were quick to disagree with “La mala” and so, the rhetorical question ‘How do Mexicans talk’ started to trend as part of the debate, questioning whether there’s only one ‘correct’ way for Mexicans to speak Spanish. When asked, “La mala” responded: “like a Mexican. tf.”

Thousands of commenters asked “How are we supposed to sound in order to be legitimized as Mexican-American?”

The hashtag was a response to Luna’s argument that all Mexicans should sound the same given that Mexico has a population of nearly 130 million and is a multicultural nation that greatly identifies as ‘mestizo’ given that it’s composed of many ethnic groups complete with their own different languages. Another user asked “How do you think Mexicans sound? Do you think we [go] buRRito and tAcO all the time?”  Luna replied, perhaps in poor taste, perhaps just making light of her own ignorance, “yea lol.”

credit Twitter @jin_butterfly

@rudeboiluna’s account has since been suspended following the heated tweets on behalf of BTS’ loyal army and the Mexican community who defended their views. Thousands of Latinx commenters chimed into the argument, a debate that greatly asked: “How are we supposed to sound in order to be legitimized as Mexican-American?”. The fact is that no one’s ethnic identity needs to be legitimized by anyone. No one has the right to invalidate another person’s cultural identity or expressions. 

“You don’t look Latina” or “You don’t even speak Spanish, “are some remarks that second- and third-generation-born American Latinos hear way too often. 

credit Twitter @somexicans

Becky G is part of a troupe of Latinx artists who have been questioned for not “looking” Latino enough, or “sounding” Latino enough. The actor and singer, has shut down the ignorant claims many times before, most famously in an essay published on Popsugar.com: 

“You don’t look Latina” or “You don’t even speak Spanish.” These are the remarks that us second- and third-generation-born American Latinos often hear. The truth is, the lack of language knowledge does not lessen the Latin blood running through our veins or the stories our last names carry. There is no “look” to the passion Latinos carry within them. Although my Spanish is flawed and I didn’t grow up in Mexico, I take pride in my roots. My family’s history and the fact that all the traditions and morals passed down have shaped me to be who I am today is what it means to be a second-generation-born Mexican-American for me.”