Entertainment

Will Smith Launches A Fresh Prince-Themed Fashion Collection So You Can Sit On Your Throne As The Fresh Prince Of Bel Air

Welcome to the age of nostalgia. From live-action remakes of our favorite Disney films to movie nights streaming 90s shows on Netflix, to the revival of high waisted jeans, scrunchies and Steinfeld-era outfits, millennials just don’t want to grow up —and Will Smith knows it. Tapping into our wistful or excessively sentimental yearning for the past, Will Smith has us revisiting the 90s yet again. That’s right, the movie-star is going back to Bel-Air. 

Will Smith announced the launch of his ‘Fresh Prince of Bel-Air’ collection on Instagram.

We’re not talking about a reboot of the show. On Tuesday, Will Smith posted a video on his instagram announcing that he’s rolling out “Bel-Air Academy Collection” a ‘Fresh Prince of Bel-Air’-themed clothing line. “I put my thang down, flipped it and reversed it. Then I put it on sale,” he captioned the post. In the video, the actor showcases some of the items from the sitcom inspired collection, including a graphic yellow T-shirt and a reversible zip-up jacket. “It’s just a sweatsuit, it’s just a sweatsuit. Until it’s not just a sweatsuit,” he teased, turning the navy jacket inside out to reveal a bold paisley-print, at the start of the video.

The actor first offered a sneak peek at his Bel-Air athletics line when he surprised a group of kids on Ellen, who went viral for giving a bullied kid some new clothes:

‘Bel-Air Athletics includes everything from socks, to a phone ring, to kids clothing, a shooter sleeve, and a basketball.

The collection is comprised by 26 items, all as fun and colorful as Will’s character in the hit TV show. Complete with the colors of the fictional prep school he attended in the series, the range includes a variety of both 90s-inspired and modern-day pieces like sportswear in the signature blue and red paisley, a tie dye throwback tee that changes color when it comes in contact with body heat. It also features a young Will Smith holding a basketball (the same Will that was shooting some b-ball outside the school, remember?). 

There are also a few different t-shirts featuring a Will Smith cartoon in different colors. The t-shirt comes in black, white, and gray, and the best part is that Will’s uniform changes from white to gold in the sun!

The collection offers some accessories too, like striped ankle-cut socks, a phone ring and a sold-out navy and paisley basketball to match the sweatsuit and other items in the range.

Credit: FreshPrince / Instagram

But copping the collection isn’t gonna be cheap. The socks are $15 and shirts run $30 to $40. Hoodies track pants and custom Bel-Air basketball are $60 and up. And last but not least, no “Fresh Prince” collection would be complete without air freshener. The range includes a cartoon Will Smith air-freshener that will set you back $6. Oh and we almost forget to mention it; there are also some goodies for the ladies. The collection includes a cropped ‘Bel-Air Athletics’ hoodie and vintage inspired navy gym shorts.

Millennials are obsessed with the 90s and although this is not the first tribute to a vintage show, it’s definitely one of the best ones.

Credit: Ralph Lauren

With the resurgence of 90s fashion and pop culture references, this collection couldn’t come at a better time. Only a few weeks ago, Ralph Lauren launched a ‘Friends’ inspired collection in honor of the show’s 25th anniversary and Jennifer Lopez broke the internet yet again after revisiting the iconic leaf-print dress she wore to the Grammys in 2000, and wearing it again just last month during Milan Fashion Week. So those vintage vibes are alive and well in the fashion world.

Some of the items, a Limited Edition Gym Bag Kit ($200), and navy and red paisley basket ball, are already sold out, after being limited to just 100 pieces. ‘The Bel-Air Academy collection is only available until Monday October 14 at shop.willsmith.com. So if you want to chill out, max out, and relax all cool in Fresh Prince of Bel-Air merch, you better act fast because it’s selling quick!

These 10 Beauty Products Have Names So Racially-Charged, You’ll Be Left Wondering ‘Who Approved Them?’

Fierce

These 10 Beauty Products Have Names So Racially-Charged, You’ll Be Left Wondering ‘Who Approved Them?’

www.ebay.com

We’ve never worked in the cosmetic industry, so we can only assume that finding the perfect name for a product can be tricky to say the least. There are products with hilarious, and even NSFW names —NARS we’re talking to you. Apparently, the more scandalous the product is named, the better. Even some of the most trendy cosmetics have cheeky names, so it seems like in the world of beauty, anything goes. From cheeky, to ridiculous to just down-right offensive, here are some names that left us wondering; who approved these?

1. Chantecaille Foundation in the shade; ’Banana’.

www.nordstrom.com

As opposed to the cute names appointed to lighter shades, such as “Aura” and “Vanilla;” the darker shade was named “Banana”. Now, maybe it’s just me, but giving a darker skin tone the name ‘banana’ sounds like a good enough reference to the monkey comparison. Comparing dark-skinned people to monkeys is a racial stance as old as America and we’d love to find out what the Chantecaille team was thinking when they gave that name to a dark skin tone —smdh.

2. Color Pop Cosmetics’ “Yikes” and “Typo” sculpting stix. 

www.colorpop.com

In the same way, as we noted in the previous example, here the lighter skin tones had names like “Castle” and “Dove,” whereas the darker ones were titled “Typo” and “Yikes.” Yikes, is there anything shocking or alarming about a darker skin tone? Nobody’s skin is a typo, Color Pop.

ColourPop issued an apology statement and quickly renamed the deeper shades. The Sculpting Stix as a whole has since been discontinued.

2. MAC Cosmetics’ “Vibe Tribe” Collection.

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I mean… do we have to keep saying this? Indigenous cultures are not fashion —or in this case beauty— trends. This 2016 collection was instantly accused of cultural appropriation and enforcing Native American stereotypes. The packaging of the collection featured ‘tribal’ patterns and the shades had names such as “Arrowhead” and “Call of the Canyon.” What’s worse, the campaign featured models wearing Native American headdresses —which we’ve established time and again, is disrespectful AF.

3. MAC Cosmetics x Rodarte “Juarez” polish.

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Ciudad Juarez is a city known for the phenomenon of female homicides, called feminicidio in Spanish. The city has been—famously, may I add—plagued by the violent deaths of hundreds of women and girls since 1993. MAC and fashion house Rodarte collaborated in a highly anticipated collection inspired by Mexico in 2010. One of the nail polishes in the collection was named ‘Juarez’, which disturbed customers and social media users. 

MAC apologized but kept the product on its shelves —guess they weren’t that sorry. The makeup brand did, however, “give a portion of the proceeds from the MAC Rodarte collection to help those in need in Juarez.”

4. The Balm’s “Meet Matt” eye shadow palette.

www.thebalm.com

Every shade in this eye shadow palette, which is still available under the site’s bestseller section, was named for a different “Matt,” and many found it’s choice of last names questionable. 

The brand paired the last names Lin, Lopez, Kumar, and Ahmed to yellow, brown, brick red, and black shades, which a lot of customers —ourselves included— found racist. 

5. Ben Nye’s Cream Character Base.

Back in 2015, Ben Nye, the special FX and stage makeup brand, sold a deep complexion base cream called “Minstrel Brown”. FYI —and get ready to have your mind blown— Minstrels were theatric shows performed by white actors in blackface during the 19th century. The shows were specifically intended to mock and degrade black people. 

Ben Nye renamed the shade —and every shade in the collection— but the brand never apologized or commented on the incredibly inappropriate name. 

6. “Iris I Was Thinner” OPI nail polish

www.makeupalley.com

Because women need to be reminded of the toxic beauty ideal that we ‘should strive to be thin’. This nail polish is a no from me, dog. 

7. “Miso Happy With This Color” OPI nail polish.

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We’ll admit that some of OPI’s nail polish color names make us giggle. But not when they’re making puns that suggest a stereotype of how Asians speak. According to portrayals in pop culture, an Asian face must mean an Asian accent — and often, the accent is for comedic effect in movies and television shows.

8. Fenty’s “Geisha Chic” highlighter

Instagram @trendmood1

Ok, we love queen RiRi but more often than not, Asian targeted racism gets glossed over and we’re not here for this name. A Geisha or ‘Geiko’ is a Japanese woman who entertains guests through talents such as dance, music, and singing —the tradition can be traced back centuries, and it’s not fair to minimize it. 

Fenty team members personally messaged the people that left comments about the product on Instagram and quickly pulled the highlighter from their online store. “We wanted to personally apologize. Thank you so much for educating us,” read their apology.

9. Wycon’s “Black As A N***a”

www.wyconcosmetics.com

At this point, I feel like brands are using racial insensitivity as a marketing ploy. Because in what world does it seem right to give a product —or anything else for the matter- this name? A quick scroll through the Italian beauty brand will leave you pressed to find any representation of people of color —but of course hip-hop culture is up for grabs when it comes to the naming of product shades for the brand, which also uses names like “Drop it Like It’s Hot” and “Bootylicious.” #cancelled

10. Kat Von D’s “Selektion” lipstick shade

twitter @thekatvond

Kat Von D has been accused of anti-semitism time and again, and I guess we’ll never know if it’s a real claim or if it’s just a product of Twitter users’ machinations. But one thing is true, her eponymous makeup line launched a lipstick shade with the name “Selektion,” which in German simply means “screening,” or “picking.” However, the use of the German word in English speek has become taboo due to the use it had by Nazis in the selection of prisoners for death in concentration camps. 

Whether the name was a deliberately insensitive pick or just an honest mistake, we would’ve erred on the side of caution and steered clear of a polemic word. 

Vogue Mexico Teamed Up With British Vogue To Show The Beauty Of ‘Muxes’ An Ancestral Gender-Fluid Indigenous Community

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Vogue Mexico Teamed Up With British Vogue To Show The Beauty Of ‘Muxes’ An Ancestral Gender-Fluid Indigenous Community

voguemexico/ Instagram

Sometimes, fashion is more than just a mirror of society. In a few instances, the fashion industry has actually been responsible for reshaping reality rather than just mirroring it. One way it does this is by breaking taboos and introducing marginalized ideas into the mainstream. The current visibility of transgender people is a development that the fashion world has embraced in recent years. Granted, fashion’s focus on the topic is, more often than not, on the “blurring of traditional lines between genders” to explore androgyny, but many designers and brands are currently emphasizing on a ‘gender-neutral’ and non-binary ethos. The editorial side of fashion however, has been a bit slow to embrace representation and support genderqueer people—but this month, Vogue Mexico and Latin-America, in collaboration with British Vogue, are leading the charge, by dedicating their cover story to a small group of people in Juchitán Oaxaca who seek to live outside of binary labels: Los Muxes.

Vogue Mexico and Latin-America has proven to be the most ‘woke’ publication of Conde Nast’s portfolio this year.

instagram @voguemexico

 The magazine has doubled up on its efforts for representation and diversity. Just this year they made history by featuring an indigenous woman, Yalitza Aparicio, on the cover of a magazine for the very first time, ever. A few months later they featured four Afro-Latinas on their cover and opened the floor to discussion about what being Afro-Latina means. Just last month they honored indigenous women of different parts of Latin America for their 20th anniversary issue. And now, the magazine is shining a light on a centuries-old non-binary indigenous community of rural Mexico, and introducing them to the world. 

In recent years, Oaxaca has become somewhat of a trendy destination. 

instagram @oaxtravel

The Zapotec state is a multicultural hub in the south of Mexico known for its delicious climate, rich food and complex history. The people of Oaxaca have fought hard to keep a lot of their centuries-old traditions and beliefs alive, and one of these beliefs —or rather, a group of people— is called “muxes.”

In Juchitán, a small indigenous town in Southern Oaxaca, a community of individuals known as ‘Muxes’, seek to live free of binary labels “male” and “female.”

instagram @johnohono

 The word muxes also spelled muxhes in some instances, comes from the Spanish word for woman “mujer,” and it generally represents people who are assigned male at birth, but identify as non-binary. Muxes have their own gender identity, different from what the West has traditionally dubbed to be female and male. 

The iterations among the Muxe community and their self-identifications vary – some identify as male but are female-expressing, while others identify as female and are more closely associated with Western culture’s understanding of transgender. In their culture, the term “third gender” might be more suitable to define Muxes. 

Muxes are ‘dual’ beings, they don’t believe in being ‘female’ or ‘male’, they simply are.

Instagram @salvadorconpan

“To be muxe is a duality. We carry out the role depending on the circumstances, sometimes I might seem like a man, and others like a woman,” says Pedro Enriquez Godínez Gutiérrez, a person known locally in Juchitán as “La Kika,” in an interview with Vogue Mexico. Apart from being a muxe, he’s the Director of Sexual Diversity of Juchitán Town Hall. 

Muxes have lived in Juchitan since pre-hispanic times, there are a few indigenous legends that explain their origins and give a faith to the antiquity of their existence.

instagram @voguemexico

There are two legends in Juchitán, that recount the origin of Muxes. One says that San Vicente Ferrer, the holy patron of Juchitán, had a pocket with holes in it, from which they fell out of. Another version says that as he walked the earth, San Vicente Ferrer, always carried three bags: one with male seeds, another loaded with female seeds, and a third that contained both seeds, mixed up. This last bag was the one that broke as he walked through Juchitán, and that is why there are so many muxes there. 

The people of Juchitán are a sort of pre-hispanic family. In this town the women are as strong as the men and muxes are as respected as both men and women. Ironically, the system of tolerance and respect that’s existed there for centuries is considered ‘modern’, elsewhere. 

Mixes are a community that not even the 21st century can wrap its head around. 

Instagram @rafa213

“Gubixha bizaani guirá neza guzá ca,” writes Vogue Mexico, is Zapotec for “the sun illuminated all the roads they have walked”, and perhaps that is why they can walk the streets without fear in a predominantly Catholic country that still struggles to offer equal rights for women and that is mostly intolerant of sexual orientations and preferences, Juchitán remains greatly untouched by this hate. Muxes walk the streets with flowers in their hair, they wear light huipiles —a traditional garment worn by indigenous women— and colorful skirts. This indigenous town is a model of how a culture can make space for life outside of the binary. Juchitán is an example to even the most progressive cities of the world. 

Vogue Mexico and Latin America teamed up with British Vogue to celebrate both British and Mexican talent. 

Instagram @voguemexico

The collaboration marked the first time both publications work together on a joint story. The experience allowed both publications to exchange ideas and share their cultures. Vogue Mexico’s cover, featuring Estrella, one of the muxes from Juchitán, was shot by Tim Walker, the iconic British fashion photographer, and the story will be published on both magazines for the month of December. 

Vogue Mexico’s Editor-In-Chief took to Instagram to share the news of the cover story. 

Instagram @karlamartinezdesalas

“It’s finally here!!! We are releasing one of our December covers early as it is a special joint collaboration with @britishvogue – thank you @edward_enninful for featur[ing] the beauty of MEXICO in the pages of British Vogue. No one could have captured the magical realism better than Tim Walker and Kate Phelan. Stay tuned for more!” wrote the Mexican editor Karla Martinez de Salas on her personal Instagram page.

Vogue Mexico’s December issue will be available nation-wide starting December 1st.