Entertainment

This Is What Millennial Michael Jackson Would Have Sounded Like

This Michael Jackson impersonator is giving us a glimpse of what millennial Michael could have been like. He goes by the moniker “Michael Trapson,” which if that’s not clever enough, dude also dresses, sounds and kinda looks like the king himself. He’s got the glove, the loafers and a pretty sick moonwalk.

Youtuber and trap rapper, OG Cano, who now goes by “Michael Trapson” is showing us all what MJ may have sounded like if he were a millennial.

Credit: Michael Trapson / Youtube

He even recreated the classic music video for “Thriller,” in an epic 14-minute music video, complete with trap, dance and monsters.

His videos have started going viral on Facebook and Instagram and he recently dropped a new song on iTunes.

The artist, who used to go by “OG Cano” described himself on this artist website as half Dominican and half black (“best of both worlds,” he says), has gone through several evolutions. He started as OG Cano, before playing with a Michael Jackson persona and eventually impersonating Prince as well, but it seems like MJ is working out best for him.


Although his sound is mostly trap, he has sampled some Michael Jackson songs.

Credit: Michael Trapson / Youtube

Most recently on the song “Out The Bong/Don’t Stop ‘Til You Smoke Enough” which Trapson released just after 4/20, he samples the classic hit “Don’t Stop ‘Til You Get Enough.” Smoking is a common theme in his music, indicated by his song “High” where he has used a sample from the song “Human Nature.” The song features the lyrics “smoking loud, in the night time,” which if you sing it, it’s a perfect blend of what music has become and where it’s come from.


Another song where he imitates Michael’s sound is on his song “Peter Pan” where he uses the rock guitar sound from “Bad.”

The song may be the one that ultimately turns true fans away as he’s clowning on Michael Jackson’s history with children. In the song, Trapson sings “now I don’t sleep with little boys…”


Although he is sampling only some of Michael Jackson’s music, it’s MJ’s essence that he’s mostly imitating.

Credit: Michael Trapson / Youtube

He’s totally capitalizing on the entire look, using MJ’s lingo, his style of speaking and pulling off some killer dance moves. Namely, he’s using the exclamation “shimone,” throwing lots of “hee-hees” around and moonwalking like a pro.


And, if you can do your best to not be hurt that someone is impersonating the undisputed King of Pop, it’s music you could actually party to.

Credit: Michael Trapson / Youtube

The music video looks just like what you’d expect from a dope trap song. And the music itself is no different from music being released by trap and mumble rap artists like Migos and Lil Yachty, and lots of people are jamming to that.


The artist was featured in a Complex News segment called “Shit We Can’t Unsee.”

Although they had a good laugh about it, Joe Budden reluctantly co-signed him, saying “I’m just happy they know who Michael Jackson is.”


Hey, as long as he’s keeping Michael Jackson alive, and we can all have more opportunities to shout shimone! and hee-hee!, it’s all good.


READ: This Music Video For ‘Fast And Furious 8’ Will Make You Want To Pack Your Bags And Visit Cuba


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Every Time I Go Back To The Dominican Republic, I Remember The Person I Am And Want To Be

Culture

Every Time I Go Back To The Dominican Republic, I Remember The Person I Am And Want To Be

aruni_y_photography / Instagram

Anyone traveling to the Dominican Republic this summer has likely been met with the cautionary warning; “Don’t drink anything from the minibar.” Eleven tourist deaths on the island in 2019, ranging from natural causes to counterfeit alcohol consumption, have spurred FBI and State Department investigations. Though news of flight and hotel cancellations abounded, I missed my family and refused to let fear stop me from seeing them. Since I lived to tell the tale, here are a few things I learned about my father, about myself, and about the precarious paradise that keeps calling me back.

Billy Joel and Nas have interpreted the “New York state of mind,” and if you have ever visited the Dominican Republic beyond the purpose of tourism, you’ll know that there exists a Dominican state of mind too.

Credit: Dan Gold / Unsplash

Whenever I exit Las Americas or Puerto Plata airports, humidity slaps me in the face, and my Dominican mindset is immediately activated. On this island, electricity does not run 24/7. When the electricity goes, or as we say “se fue la luz,” water doesn’t run from the tap either. All that is left to do is swap your sneakers for flip-flops, and exorcise your need for immediate gratification. It takes practice, and I re-learn this lesson with each visit.

The Dominican Republic is changing fast. 

Credit: zonacolonialrd / Instagram

There is new construction everywhere you look. I sit on the balcony chatting with my father and stare across the street trying to remember how it looked before the apartment building was constructed in that space. I can see from an open doorway on the ground level that wooden boxes are being stacked, and hauled out in front of a business. I tune out my father’s voice as I focus on the shape and size of the boxes. My Spanish needs work, and I ask my father, “Papi, what does ataúd mean?” The business slogan translates to “Quality Coffins.” I think about magic realism traditions in Latin American literature, and I am reminded that so often a country like this juxtaposes disparate images and experiences in such a casual manner. I don’t think I would be able to live across the street from a constant reminder of death anywhere else but on this incongruous island.

We drive to the countryside of El Seibo for a few days.

Credit: fedoacurd/ Instagram

My father syncs his playlist and he directs my sister what song to play next. The first song is by Boy George. I watch my father sing along, and I can’t help but think about the Dominican Republic’s homophobic culture steeped in hyper-masculinity. Same-sex marriage is not recognized on the island, and members of the LGBTQ community continue to face discrimination and violence. I talk to my sister about this later that night, and she tells me small changes are coming to the island. The city of Santo Domingo hosts inclusive events like Draguéalo, where you can even sign up for a Vogue class.

Credit: Draguelao / Facebook

My father’s playlist continues and I’m struck by his selections ranging from Taylor Swift to A.I.E. (A Mwana), a song by a 1970s group called Black Blood, featuring lyrics in Swahili.

I watched this Dominican dad jam across continents, decades, cultures, languages, and race. I realize there is so much I don’t know about him, and so often we shortchange our parents’ knowledge and experience, reducing them to stereotypes and gendered tropes.

My next lesson is on staying sexy.

                                                           Unsplash/Photo by Ardian Lumi 

After a few days in the countryside, my sister and I rent a hotel room in La Zona Colonial. We ready for a night out when she looks at my outfit and asks me, “Um, is that what you’re wearing tonight?” I thought my yellow jumpsuit was poppin’. My sister pulls out a little black dress from her overnight bag and kindly suggests I wear it. The dress is tiny. It’s skimpy. It’s super short. It’s absolutely perfect. I channel my inner Chapiadora, Goddess of Sex Appeal and Free Drinks, and dance all night. 

Growing up in the 90s, I styled myself in oversized men’s clothing. It wasn’t until that one magical summer in the Dominican Republic when the heat was too oppressive to wear jeans, so I wore—gasp—a skirt. That was the first time I felt sexy, and learned the power of sex appeal. Though I wielded that power throughout my twenties, it fell away in my thirties. Wearing my sister’s LBD I realize I still have “it,” and in the Dominican Republic, sex appeal is ageless. Be careful when you come here. You may fall in love with a local, or you may just fall in love with yourself again.

The island leaves me with one last lesson.

It comes late one night, sharing a few bottles of wine with my father and sister. No hay peor ciego que el que no quiere ver—the worst blind person is the one who refuses to see. I could say the current political landscape in the U.S. reflects this willful ignorance, a refusal to see; yet it is the same human experience felt across space and time.

I come away wondering about my own blind spots.

                                                            Instagram/@rensamayoa

I board my return flight thinking up ways to combat willful ignorance at home, thinking about maintaining that flexible DR state of mind and thinking about buying a little black dress. As tourism in the Dominican Republic picks up again, and unfavorable headlines drop out of the news cycle, this changing island stands in its own plurality welcoming visitors, and offering endless opportunities to teach us something new.

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In Her Latest Attempt To Take Over The Fashion Industry, Cardi B May Very Likely, Probably Yes, Be Releasing A Makeup Line

Entertainment

In Her Latest Attempt To Take Over The Fashion Industry, Cardi B May Very Likely, Probably Yes, Be Releasing A Makeup Line

Theo Wargo / Staff | Getty Images North America

Besides her fire music, excellent commentary on politics, and hilariously honest iterations of her relationships, Cardi B, is a Latina who has also built her platform on style. The trap rapper has become notorious for serving up some of the boldest and flawless looks in entertainment. Particularly when it comes to her makeup.

Whether she’s just playing around on Instagram or appearing at the Met Gala, fans of Cardi can always depend on her to cut a lewk.

Turns out Cardi B might be working on a project that could have you rocking her bold style “very” soon.

Speaking with Entertainment Tonight about her 2019 Fashion Nova collection, which is her third collaboration with the company, the rapper spoke about her other business ventures, including her beauty line. When asked whether Cardi saw herself doing another beauty line soon she responded saying “very.”

When asked by the reporter to give us a little more information about the line she replied it was “Something that I want to do,” Cardi responded.

Based on Cardi B’s previous makeup venture, we can promise we’ll be standing at our comps ready to hit the click button.

Fans of Cardi B will likely remember that her limited-edition collaboration with Tom Ford quickly sold out.

Of course, now everyone has theories about who Cardi B’s next collab could be with.

@queenbelcaliscardib / Instagram

Fans in Cardi B’s comments section have speculated that she could be working on something with Pat McGrath, who Cardi B has worn to the past two Met Galas. The Black British makeup artist provided Cardi with her mean pout and bold bronzed look.

There’s also speculation that her collaboration could make for a Fashion Nova first.

After all, the style maven has notoriously had a big place in her heart for the brand. No doubt, a Fashion Nova x Cardi B fashion line would give the rapper more clout, and ensure the further building of her fashion empire.