Entertainment

What Famous Latin American Telenovelas Stars Up To Years After Their TV Debuts

Oh, telenovelas. How we love them. Many of us grew up watching these exciting dramas unfurl on the television screen while our mamás or abuelas shushed us so they could hear their stories. Novelas taught us all about love, betrayal, hope and doing things just for the drama of it all. Some of us have even kept up the habit of following these tales now that we’re adults.

Where has the time gone? Not only have we grown, but the children who stared in these novelas are adults too. We began wondering what the novela child stars we grew up with have gotten up to in their adulthood.

It’s time to check in on a few of our favs and see the success and accomplishments that have followed them from their days of novelas.

1. Gael Garcia Bernal

Instagram / @gaelgarciab

Gael Garcia may be a regular face on the red carpet now but his beginnings are strictly novela. In 1989, he got his first role as “Peluche” on the novela “Teresa.” His next stint in 1992 landed him on “El Abuelo y Yo” as “Daniel.” From there, he’s had a series of compelling roles like “Ernesto Guevara de la Serna” in “The Motorcycle Diaries” and “Rodrigo De Souza” in “Mozart in the Jungle.” He even voiced “Hector” in Disney’s “Coco” back in 2017. The future is full for the star; he has even been cast as “Zorro” in his next big feature film.

2. Ludwika Paleta

Instagram / @ludwicka_paleta
Ludwika Paleta made her television debut back in 1989 in the drama “Carrusel.” From that moment, it was obvious she was a star. For her next role, she played “Alejandra” on the novela “El Abuelo y Yo.” Since then, Paleta has had recurring roles in over a dozen Mexican television shows. Additionally, the actress played Hollywood icon Zsa Zsa Gabor in the series “Rubirosa.” She is currently working on the drama “Mami, una Mujer Ideal” and has another series — “Modern Lovers” — coming out in October of 2019

3. Diego Luna

Instagram / @diegoluna_
Like Palate and Garica Bernal, Diego Luna also got his start on the novela “El Abuelo y Yo.” He would later have his big breakout role in 2001’s “Y Tu Mamá También” as “Tenoch Iturbide.” Roles like “Manolo” in “The Book of Life” and the mystery man in Katy Perry’s music video for “The One That Got Away” would later follow and keep him in the public eye. in 2016, he became a member of the “Star Wars” family with his performance in “Rogue One.” More recently, the actor has taken on more producing and directing positions and has appeared in Netflix’s original series “Narcos: Mexico.”

4. Thalía

Instagram / @thalia

You might know her as the “Latin Queen of Pop,” but Thalía started as an un-credited teen actress on the Mexican drama “War of the Pastries.” In 1987, she would go on to a supporting role in “Pobre Señorita Limantour.” After that, Thalía would star in several other telenovelas while simultaneously pursuing her rapidly successful career in pop music. 1999 would see her staring in “Rosalind,” an extremely popular series that got her even more recognition for her acting chops. After this role, she would leave the telenovela world to focus more on her music. In 2013, Thalía would be rewarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame because of her contributions to music and entertainment. 

5. Lucero

Instagram / @sonrielucero

Recognized by “People en Español” as the “Queen of the Telenovelas,” Lucero actually started back in the day on the popular children’s entertainment show “Alegrias de Mediodia.” In the series, the 13-year-old actress would sing and act in multiple skits; showcasing her multiple talents. Lucero would quickly move on to movies, starring in a total of 7 films along with several additional novelas over the years. Well-respected by her industry peers, the entertainer has hosted the Latin Grammys a total of 8 times. She also lends her talents to the yearly Teletón Mexico; hosting the event to raise donations for children with disabilities. 

6. Belinda

Instagram / @belindapop

Called the “Princess of Latin Pop” by Billboard Music, Belinda got her start on the telenovela “Amigos x Siempre.” She was featured in a few other novelas before she debuted her 2003 album, “Belinda,” at the age of 13. This first album would go on to sell 2.5 million copies. Besides working on her booming music career, the star appeared in movies like “Baywatch” and “The Cheetah Girls 2.” Most recently, she’s enjoying a stint as a judge on “La Voz” — Mexico’s popular version of “The Voice.”

7. Paulina Rubio

Instagram / @paulinarubio

Since the age of 7, Paulina Rubio knew she wanted to be a singer. However, she first took a detour as an actress during her teen years. In 1988, the teen had a recurring role on “Pasión y Poder” before moving on to novelas like “Baila Conmigo” and “Pobre Niña Rica.” In 1992, Rubio released her first record, “La Chica Dorada;”  shifting her focus more towards pursuing her dreams of music. In total, the star has released 11 studio albums. Since her noveala, she’s appeared as a judge on “La Voz Kids” and “The X Factor” as well as sold 15 million records worldwide.

8. Christopher von Uckermann

Instagram / @christophervuckermann
Mexican singer, songwriter and actor Christopher von Uckermann started with a small role on “El Diario de Daniela” but soon moved on to bigger things. In 2000, he starred on “Amigos x Siempre” alongside Belinda. His later role as Diego Bustamante on “Rebelde” made him a well-known star among international audiences. He also pursued a music career as a member of the group RBD. After five years with the group, von Uckermann broke out as a solo musical act. He has continued to focus both on his music and acting careers. Since his novela days, he has released his first EP, La Revolución de los Ciegos, and has starred in influential series like “Kdabra” and “Diablero.”

9. Anahí

Instagram / @anahi

Anahi started her acting career at the super young age of 2. She was a regular on “Chiquilladas” and would find herself acting in telenovelas for two decades to come. Throughout her childhood, she acted in different novelas like “Ángeles Sin Paraíso,”  “Alondra” and “El Diario de Daniela.” The star also began her singing career at the age of 10 with the release of her first studio album. Anahí has a total of 6 albums and sings in Spanish, Portuguese, English, and Italian. She’s also one of the most followed Latinx artist on the internet. In fact, she was the first Mexican person to reach a million followers on Twitter. Recently, she’s been taking time to be a wife and mother but we’re sure we’ll see more from her soon. 

10. Angélica Vale

Instagram / @angelicavaleoriginal

Born into a Mexican show business dynasty, Angélica Vale started acting very early. After a few small roles in different telenovelas, she became the leading character on “Lupita” at only 8 years of age. She’s later acted in novelas like “Soñadoras” and “Amigas y Rivales'” which landed her critical acclaim from audiences and critics alike. However, her biggest role was still to come with her starring part in “La Fea Más Bella.” Vale is also a singer who has contributed music to 7 different albums. The entertainer is also a master impersonator and has done imitations of everyone from Shakira to Thalía to Laura León. 

This Short Film Centers Around A Black Father Doing His Daughter’s Hair

Entertainment

This Short Film Centers Around A Black Father Doing His Daughter’s Hair

When it comes to grooming a daughter’s hair, Black fathers haven’t been shy about expressing the difficulties that come along with the morning ritual. And Afro-Latino fathers are no exception. In Latinx communities with large Afro-Latino populations, having “good hair” is a label we all have to contend with. Young girls have a lot of pressure put on them to look put-together so, by extension, our families look put together. 

We all have memories of our mothers making sure our baby-bangs were smoothed down and our outfits were washed and pressed to perfection. 

Being well-groomed is so important to Afro-Latinos who face societal pressure to look perfect in order to combat bias.

Kickstarter

So, when fathers occasionally have to groom their children when their mother is unavailable, the pressure, needless to say, is on. We’ve all seen the genre of viral videos where fathers struggle to part, brush, braid and secure their daughters’ hair–obviously not previously aware of all the labor that goes into daily hair upkeep. Even celebrities have gotten in on the trend with men like Alexis Ohanian, husband to Serena Williams, joining “Natural Hair” groups on Facebook to learn more about their children’s rizos

Writer/director Matthew Cherry wanted to explore the topic of Black fathers doing their daughters hair, so he decided to make an animated short about it.

Kickstarter

According to Cherry, the short, titled “Hair Love” is about a Black father (who has locs himself) who does his daughter’s hair for the first time. “You know how guys are, a lot of times we’re hard-headed and we think we can figure everything out by ourselves without asking for help,” said Cherry during an interview. “[The father in the short] thinks it’s going to be an easy task but he soon finds out her hair has a mind of its own”. 

The father isn’t the only one who learns a lesson in self-confidence in the course of the film, though. In the end, the young girl also “comes into a level of self-confidence in the process” of her father learning how to do her hair. So, in other words, the entire film is an ode to self-love, family, and the priceless experience of bonding.

To finance “Hair Love”, Cherry created a Kickstarter campaign with the initial goal of raising $75,000. The campaign quickly caught the internet’s attention and became a viral phenomenon thanks to celebrity champions like Issa Rae and Jordan Peele. The $75,000 goal was quickly surpassed. All in all, the campaign raked in a total of $280,000–smashing Kickstarter’s short-film financing records. 

Cherry recruited Black animators like “Proud Family”‘s Bruce W. Smith and “WALL-E”‘s Everett Downing Jr. to help him make his dreams a reality.

As for Cherry, he’s candid about the reason he decided to explore the topic of Black hair and Black fathers: because mainstream media’s representation has left much to be desired. According to Cherry, not only did he want to shine a light on the labor of love that doing Black hair requires, but he wanted to highlight the relationships between Black fathers and their daughters. 

“For me, I just think it was really important to shine a light on Black fathers doing domestic things with their kids because mainstream media would lead you to believe that Black fathers aren’t a part of their kids’ lives”, Cherry said. “And there have been a lot of recent surveys that actually show otherwise–that show that Black fathers are just as involved in their kids’ lives as any other racial group”.

Now, “Hair Love” will be played ahead of “The Angry Birds Movie 2” in theaters nationwide

Kickstarter

The nationwide release will provide a massive platform for an under-told story. Not to mention, it will provide Black children with their own images reflected back to them–something many of them haven’t seen before. Not to mention, the security of a theatrical release has made “Hair Love” officially eligible for an Academy Award nomination. 

As for Cherry, he’s over-the-moon about the opportunity for his project to be seen by millions of people. “To see this project go from a Kickstarter campaign to the big screen is truly a dream come true,” he said in a press statement. “I couldn’t be more excited for “Hair Love” to be playing with “The Angry Birds Movie 2” in front of a wide audience and for the world to see our touching story about a Black father trying to figure out how to do his daughter’s hair for the very first time.”

We’ll admit: we didn’t have plans to see “Angry Birds 2” in theaters before we knew about this. But now, you might just see us on opening night, standing in line for the movie right next to our fathers! Catch “Hair Love” before  “The Angry Birds Movie 2” in theaters on August 14th.

Video: This Is How People Reacted When They Heard A White Mom Tell Her Adopted Latina Daughter To Speak English

Culture

Video: This Is How People Reacted When They Heard A White Mom Tell Her Adopted Latina Daughter To Speak English

It seems like every other day there’s a new viral video of an old Trump supporter or a young white bro telling a Latinx person in the US to stop speaking Spanish. Recently, two elder women angrily ordered a Puerto Rican manager of a Central Florida Burger King to go back to Mexico when they overheard him speaking Spanish in a private conversation, while two Mexican-American women were detained by the U.S. Customs and Border Protection just for speaking Spanish at a Montana supermarket. The xenophobic and racist attacks, both verbal and physical, have made many feel like it’s dangerous to speak their own tongue or like an outcast for communicating to their parents or grandparents in the only language they know.

The English-only movement has further divided a country, with those ignited by the bigotry of the Trump administration unfoundedly threatened by just the sound of a person of color speaking another tongue and others who understand there is no official language in the US supporting the linguistic freedom and multiculturalism that allegedly makes the nation exceptional. 

On an episode of What Would You Do?, host John Quiñones confronts the schismatic topic. 

During the nearly 9-minute-long segment of the ABC series, a white mother tells her adopted Latina daughter to only speak Spanish and instructs her to order a hamburger instead of a traditional Latin American dish. Using hidden cameras to record the very common, but in this case staged, scenario, viewers get a peak of how ordinary people behave when they witness dilemmas that either compel them to intervene or mind their own business.

During the segment, Michele, the mother, and Isabella, the daughter, are grabbing a bite at a diner in Orangeburg, New York. The child asks the Latina waitress for arroz con leche, to which her mother responds, “Isabella, stop speaking Spanish. You’re American. That is not your language. What is wrong with you?” The first person to overhear, an elder white teacher, engages with the duo, telling Michele she doesn’t think she’s going about the situation “in the right way.” 

“She should be proud of her Spanish language, not to be made to feel like she’s doing something wrong,” she tells the mother. Later, she even advises the mom to learn Spanish and tells the young girl that Spanish is a beautiful language.

When Quiñones, himself a Texas-born Mexican-American, reveals his crew and asks why the woman intervened, she responded, “When it comes to children, I go from a mouse to a lion. I just don’t like anybody taking advantage of a child.”

In another scene, Isabela asks for arroz con pollo. Michele, visibly upset, scolds the girl. “Isabella, in English,” she demands. “I brought you here to give you a better life, and I want you to speak American.

This time, another teacher in a nearby table overhears and decides to offer Michele a quick lesson — in patience.

ABC

When Michele stresses that she just wants her daughter to speak English because they’re in the US, the teacher sympathizes with her. “I know. I’m a teacher, and I get it. But you’re not going to get anywhere demanding it, and you can’t get frustrated by it.”

She then turns to the girl and attempts to rationalize her mother’s actions. When Isabela asks the woman “do you think it’s wrong to speak Spanish,” she replies, “Not to mommy, because mommy doesn’t understand that. It’s good manners if you are with other people that don’t speak it, to speak English.”

When Quiñones pops out and confronts the patron, he asks her why she didn’t flat-out tell the mother she was wrong. The woman, who noted that Michele would have had better results honoring rather than attacking her daughter’s native tongue, said she was “getting very frustrated” and “was thinking maybe it was very bad,” but doesn’t know why she didn’t challenge Michele more on it.

In the next case, it’s a Puerto Rican diner who overhears the conversation. Not immediately making any comment, when Michele steps away, Isabela engages with the patron, who informs her she, too, speaks Spanish. “Yo hablo español,” she says, before asking if the young girl likes living in the US. “That’s good that somebody loving adopted you,” she says.

When Michele returned, she asks the woman if she agrees that her daughter should be speaking English instead of Spanish, to which she responds yes. At that moment, her partner, a white man, appears puzzled and chimes in: “You speak Spanish,” he tells his girlfriend. “I don’t make you speak English.” He then reacts to Michele, saying, “She [his girlfriend] speaks Spanish whenever she wants, and there’s nothing wrong with that.”

When Quiñones comes out, he asks why the couple reacted the way they did. The boyfriend didn’t agree with the mother, explaining, “that’s who she is. That’s part of her identity.” As for the girlfriend, who was more sympathetic to the mom, she disclosed the discrimination she and her family experienced as Latinas in their predominately white neighborhood speaking Spanish and hoped the girl wouldn’t share her same fate. “I was a little annoyed in a way,” she said, “… but I’ve dealt with that.” She continued: “my mother spoke no English, and I had many fights when I was a teenager, people who would make fun a lot of times.”

Finally, in the last performance, it’s a white woman who is married to a Greek immigrant who is shaken by the confrontation. Angry by the conversation she overhears, she checks in on Isabela the moment her mom steps away, asking the girl if she wants her to call someone for her own safety and soon after informing a manager of the situation and urging them to phone officials who could help the girl.

When the mother returns, the woman confronts her. 

ABC

“We’re foreigners, so I don’t really understand what you’re talking about.” After Michele responds, “I just want her to be more American,” the woman questions, “and just forget about where she came from?” She continued: “We’re from Greece. We would never forget where we come from.”

Michele suggests that it’s different because her daughter is from Mexico, to which the woman, furious, says, “so you guys don’t accept Mexicans in your family?”

She added: “This is a melting pot of thousands of different people. My husband is Greek and my kids will speak Greek.”

Quiñones, who appears in the midst of the argument, informs the patron that she is on a TV show. The woman, who says she’s glad it’s fake because she was about to punch Michele, reaffirms that the US is a country where everyone is supposed to be welcomed and could proudly speak with their language. 

Meeting the actress who played Isabela, the woman tells her, “You would have been coming home with me tonight, and you would have been speaking English, Spanish, and Greek.”

Watch the entire segment below! 

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