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These Poets Flipped The Script And Held Up A Mirror To Conservative White America And The Atrocities Committed

Write About Now / YouTube

Write About Now is a collective of poets been that gives other poets a platform to spread their message. Poets of color have used their slam nights to air their grievances, push the envelope with their words and to silence crowds into submission with their powerful performances. This time, four poets of color teamed up to create a poem directed at the America they have felt attacked by — they did not hold back. This is “American Horror Story.”

The poets first listed people that had been oppressed by conservative, white America, namely:

CREDIT: Write About Now / YouTube

“They’re coming for you / If they happen to possess one or more of these qualities / You are f*cked.”

“There’s no stopping them / If a river made by God couldn’t drown them…”

CREDIT: Write About Now / YouTube

The poets use the analogy of using silver bullets to end the lives of the “wicked” but iterate that nothing can silence those who use their voices.

They also make reference to conservative, white America’s longing to purge the country of people who are different.

CREDIT: Write About Now / YouTube

“Because it is 2017 and we are still vilified and demonized and made out to be monsters / Lurking on street corners / Or hiding in a closet / Are you more afraid of black bodies / Or the ghosts you turn them into,” they say.

They mention how oppressed minorities are seen as bloodsuckers whose “hardworking hands turn into fangs…”

CREDIT: Write About Now / YouTube

The poets talk about how people of color are often made to feel like they have to whitewash themselves to make others comfortable. Yet, after that, they are still seen as undesirable and treated like a virus.

Then, the poets flip the script. They put themselves in the shoes of colonizers to show how much damage they’ve done.

CREDIT: Write About Now / YouTube

“Watch their bloody bodies sacrifice / Then silence their voices / We will strap down your children / And burn their hands as they’re forced to watch the sins of straight couples / Till they blister and bleed the straight away / We will storm white Wall Street / Set buildings ablaze / Noose white necks / Watch them sing in an amber lit sunset,” the group rants as they flip the script.

But they catch themselves as they make “them” too uncomfortable. Maybe they went too far by painting a picture of white bodies experiencing the abuse of brown and black bodies.

CREDIT: Write About Now / YouTube

“The scariest thing is / We might be your worst nightmare / But you’re still our reality,” the group ends and the crowd erupts in applause.

You can watch the full poem below.


READ: This Poet Destroys The Haters Shaming Us For Speaking Spanish And Then Takes Pity On Them

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Even In Her 70s, Victoria Cruz Continues To Fight For The LGBTQ Community

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Even In Her 70s, Victoria Cruz Continues To Fight For The LGBTQ Community

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The history of Gay Rights in the country date back to the late ’60s and the epicenter was Manhattan. The core fighters of the LGBTQ community include Marsha P. Johnson, Scott G. Brown, Sylvia Rivera, and a slew of other pioneers. The sad thing is this generation has passed or will very soon, which is why we have to honor their legacy while they’re still alive. One of those people is an inspiring person in our Latinx community.

Victoria Cruz, who is in her 70s, is a survivor of the Stonewall Riots and is still very much a part of the fight for LGBTQ rights.

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Cruz, who was born in Puerto Rico, is one of 11 children that grew up in New York. While Cruz was born a male, she knew since she was in high school that she was a woman. Back in the ’60s, that was no easy thing to admit, yet her Puerto Rican family supported her transition.

While her family and close community were supportive, Cruz faced immense hardships including harassment from the police, and later in the ’90s, she was assaulted.

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Four of her coworkers physically assaulted her, which left her in ruins.

“I was very angry. Very angry,” Cruz said in an interview with Vanity Fair in 2017. “The worst part of it is that I couldn’t feel the ground beneath me, and added that she was “was contemplating suicide,” at the time.

But she overcame that tough time and is recognized as a leader in the movement for Gay Rights.

Yet, despite the hate and violence she faced, Cruz pushed on standing up for her LGBTQ+ family.

“I used to go to St. Vincent’s on my lunch hour…and I would see her,” Cruz told The Advocate. “She called to me, ‘Victoria, come here.’ And she always called me Dickie, you know, so when she said, ‘Victoria come here,’ I knew that she meant business. I sat down, and she looked at me. She said, ‘Try to keep the community together because we are our own worst enemy. And there’s power in numbers.’ And then she said, ‘The world will come up to try to divide us, and when you divide a community, you conquer it. So try to keep the community together.’”

As a trans woman and pioneer of the LGBTQ movement, Cruz said positive change is happening right now.

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“I’m optimistic, and I’m hopeful that it will change for the better,” she told The Advocate. “There’s power in numbers. If we unite and keep united, we can make the future different, and what we want it to be. By galvanizing one another, we galvanize each other. And with the same frame of mind, the same frame of thought, we can change what’s happening.”

Trans rights are the new frontier in the LGBTQ+ movement. Despite the contributions made to the movement by trans women of color, cis members of the LGBTQ+ community ignore their plight or add to the harassment.

“There is so much hatred directed toward queer people, particularly transgender women of color. For what? Why? I think it may be about people’s own insecurities about their own identities and sexualities. And further, people don’t know their history,” Cruz told BC/Stories. “The transgender experience isn’t new. It’s as old as the human experience, and anyone who does their research would know this. I think society needs to be educated, and maybe after being educated, empathy will follow.”

READ: Zuri Moreno Made Sure The Trans Community In Montana Remained Safe

Here’s Why AOC Called Her Address At Bronx’s Pride “The Most BX” Speech She Ever Gave

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Here’s Why AOC Called Her Address At Bronx’s Pride “The Most BX” Speech She Ever Gave

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Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) made an appearance at Bronx Pride 2019 on Sunday, where she gave an air horn-accompanied address that she called “The most BX pride speech I ever gave.”

As the Puerto Rican congressional freshman, who hails from the borough, shouted LGBTQ  policy points she has advocated for in her five months in elected office, spectators blasted “bwa-bwa-bwa-bwaaah” air horns, a familiar sound to the community that birthed hip-hop.

“They really cued up the horns for our policy points. There’s no place like home,” she later tweeted alongside a couple laughing-crying emojis.

During her short talk, AOC touched on what Pride, a time to commeorate the trans women of color-led Stone Wall riots that birthed the gay rights movement and led to the LGBTQ battles and wins of today, means.

“Pride is about honoring the community workers, the people who work in the clinics, the community organizers, the people who work with LGBTQ youth, the people who are fighting to make sure that it’s not just about marriage equality, but quality of life for all people in the community,” she said.

The congresswoman also highlighted some of the biggest issues impacting queer communities at the moment.

“What does the LGBTQ fight mean in a post-marriage-equality world? Here’s what it means: It’s making PrEP free for all people,” she said, as an air horn blasted. 

In Congress, Ocasio-Cortez has led the fight for affordable PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis), which could decrease the spreading of HIV during sexual intercourse, criticizing the CEO of Gilead, the pharmaceutical company behind the PrEP drug Truvada, in May during a congressional hearing over the high cost of the drug.

“It means tackling the homelessness crisis among our LGBTQ youth,” she continued, with the sound of another “bwa-bwa-bwa-bwaaah” following. 

“It means decarcerating our society so that no trans woman and no person ever dies again in custody,” she said, alluding to the death of transgender Afro-Latina Layleen Polanco earlier this month in New York’s Rikers Island, as another round of air horns exploded. 

“It means no one is denied a job because of their gender identity, no matter what it is,” she said to a final blast.

Ocasio-Cortez wasn’t the only elected official at Bronx Pride. State Senator Alessandra Biaggi and Senator Chuck Schumer were also in attendance, supporting and taking photos with those who participated in the parade.

Since taking office, the young congresswoman has made issues confronting the LGBTQ community a top priortity.

Read: Historians And AOC Agree That Detention Centers Look Like Concentration Camps But Conservatives Don’t Want To Hear It

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