Entertainment

These 17 Latino Dances Were Huge At One Time And They Should Be Huge Again

There’s something to be said about the versatility of dance. Feeling down? Shake it off with a boogie. Feeling happy? Feel even better by tapping your feet to the beat, babes! Trying to avoid that one socially-awkward cousin at a big family bash? You guessed it – it’s time to make your way to the dance floor. We’ve put together a list of stellar latino dances for you to try at home, so you’ll never be caught unawares when you next need to show off your moves. You’re welcome.

1. La Macarena by Los del Rio

If you don’t know the Macarena, babes, you’re lacking some serious cultural education. This Spanish hit was released in 1993, and the rest was history. La Macarena is a mainstay on the wedding circuit, and it unfailingly gets everyone up out of their seats when it starts playing. Even if you don’t have a rhythmic bone in your body, it’s pretty easy to follow the steps once everyone is on their third rotation of the dance.

2. Suavemente by Elvis Crespo

Youtube / Elvis Crespo

If there is anything that is iconic about the video clip for Suavemente, it’s the clearly 90s-esque vibe it’s got going on. Elvis Crespo gave us a classic song for us to show off the best of our merengue skills. The trick is having a partner who can keep up with our fabulousness, right? Or, uh, making sure to move our hips to the music while we keep our upper body relaxed and slow-moving.

3. El Baile del Perrito by Wilfrido Vargas

Youtube / Rafael Alvarez

Considering that dogs are one of the best things in the world, it only stands to reason that The Puppy Dance is the goodest of bois. Dances. We mean dances. Wilfrido Vargas taught us all how to dance to the rhythm of a dog’s bark – and if that isn’t a worthy achievement, then we don’t know what is.

4. Hong Kong Mambo by Tito Puente

Youtube / Pedro Velazco

If your abuela doesn’t know this song, you need to find yourself a new abuelita. Okay, if her cooking makes up for it, then you can keep her around for a little longer. Anyway, the Hong Kong Mambo was literally made for dancing the mambo. In fact, the album it was released on, Dance Mania, is listed on the US’ National Recording Registry, which makes it a certified banger. 

5. Aserejé (The Ketchup Song) by Las Ketchup

Youtube / Altra Moda Music

Who could forget this absolute classic from the early 2000s? Even though no-one really knew what the lyrics were on about, that wasn’t really the point of the song. Rather, it was one hella bueno song to just swing your hips, your hands and your hair, and know that you definitely nailed it.

6. Retrato Cantado de um Amor by Reinaldo

But what if you’re in the mood to do a classic samba? Don’t worry babes, Reinaldo’s got you covered. This hit from Rio de Janeiro is played without fail at Carnival, so you better brush up on the samba before you go!

7. Payaso del Rodeo by Caballo Dorado

Youtube / Fernando Solis vevo

Caballo Dorado’s Payaso del Rodeo starts out like your typical box-step kinda tune – think along the lines of Billy Ray Cyrus’ “Achy Breaky Heart.” But don’t be fooled, since the song speeds up and will have you sweating by the end of it!

8. La Chona by Los Tucanes de Tijuana

Youtube / LosTuncanesTV

You know when the party starts to die down, and everyone’s taking a breather? Well, La Chona’s the song that gets everyone back on the dance floor again, ready to tackle the quebradita!

9. Lambada by Kaoma

Youtube / ClubMusic80s

Even though Kaoma is a French group, they released their catchy song, Lambada, in Portuguese in honor of the dance style found in Brazil! It’s characterized by real fast, swaying hip movements, which were only accentuated by 90s fashion when the song was released.

10. Mi Cucu by La Sonora Dinamita

Youtube / Sabor Latino

So, this isn’t necessarily the fastest song in the playbook when it comes to putting together a Saturday night playlist. But, does that make it any less fun to dance along to? No, no it does not. Slow twirls are the way to go with this one. And it least it gives you some time to catch your breath!

11. La Bomba by Azul Azul

Youtube / amomibolivia

You put your hand on your head, and then your hand on your hips. And if it looks like “this,” then you’re doing it right – wait, wrong song. Anyway, if you do as the man says, you can’t go wrong with La Bomba.

12. La Bala by Los Hermanos Flores

Youtube / beyblademetal33

If you wondering what song you’ll be dancing your next cumbia to, it’ll probably be Los Hermanos Flores’ La Bala. This El Salvadoran band gave us the perfect melody for placing your hand on your stomach, and then rubbing it. And yes, you’ll look like you’re hungry. That’s not necessarily a bad thing, if you’ve been eyeing off the guac – hopefully someone will take pity on you and save some for later.

13. 1, 2, 3 by El Símbolo-TNN

Youtube / MUNICIPIOPC

This Argentinian hit is nice and easy – to be honest, it’s a great way to get the party started. The dance goes like so: everyone to the bottom, everyone to the top, then get close to your dance partner and shake it off. 

14. Sopa de Caracol by Banda Blanca

Youtube / viejoteca tropical bailable

It’s electro, it’s got horns, and it’s got unintelligible lyrics – it’s perfect! While the original music video had everyone shaking their hips to beat, you could probably get away with almost anything when it comes to Sopa de Caracol. This is your time to shine, babe.

15. Oy Como Va by Celia Cruz

Youtube / CeliaCruzVEVO

The cha-cha is a great excuse to get close to your dance partner and have some fun! Especially since there’s something real sexy about swinging your hips and shuffling your feet quickly in time to a fast beat. And so, Celia Cruz’s Oy Como Va is the perfect song to get those cha-cha-cha vibes going!

16. El Vanao by Los Cantantes

Youtube / TioTeo

This is the best song for letting your weird shine through. And it’s the best song for everyone else to get their weird on, too. If you’re not putting your fingers to your head in a mock-horn fashion, then you’re doing it wrong. After all, the point of it is to look like the music video! The original featured the artists dressed as deers, while remixes since have had computer-generated horns coming out of people’s heads. Yeah. Wow.

17. Za Za Za by DJ Oscar Lobo and Grupo Climax

Youtube / juanitollego

This song will have you clapping. Seriously! The true way to get into this song is by singing “mesa mesa” at the top of your lungs, and clapping along to the beat. That’s what makes it such a classic at quinceaneras.

So, which dance is your favorite? Let us know on our Facebook page – you can find it by clicking on the logo at the top of the page. 

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Selena Gomez Releases New Spanish-Language Single ‘De Una Vez’ and Teases Full Spanish Album: ‘I’m Targeting My Heritage’

Entertainment

Selena Gomez Releases New Spanish-Language Single ‘De Una Vez’ and Teases Full Spanish Album: ‘I’m Targeting My Heritage’

Photo via selenagomez/Instagram

Good news, Selenators! Word on the street is that Selena Gomez will soon be dropping her first-ever Spanish language album. The rumors started after Gomez dropped a surprising (and beautiful!) new Spanish-language single, “De Una Vez”.

Soon after the single dropped, rumors of a full Spanish-language studio album began to swirl when murals promoting “De Una Vez” and a yet-unreleased single “Baila Conmigo” popped up across, Mexico.

To make matters even better, Selena already dropped “De Una Vez”‘s music video.

The lush and imaginative video has been garnering praise for its inclusion of Latin American visuals and symbols. Gomez hired Tania Verduzco and Adrian Perez to direct her video–a husband and wife team who hail from Mexico and Spain, respectively and go by the moniker Los Pérez.

Of hiring Spanish speakers to direct her video, Gomez revealed to Vogue online that the decision was intentional. “If I was going to completely immerse myself into a project inspired by Latin culture, I wanted to work with native Spanish speaking creators,” she said.

And indeed, Verduzco and Perez tried to infuse as much Latin spirit into the video’s conception as possible.

“Magical realism has always been part of the Latin culture, whether it be in art or telenovelas,” Gomez told Vogue. “I wanted [to capture] that sense of a supernatural world.”

They accomplished this sense of magical realism by utilizing motifs from Mexican folk art, like Milagro, which is symbolized by the glowing heart that is beating within Gomez’s chest throughout the video.

“We wanted to play with powerful language and images. We designed the heart—we call it the Milagro in Mexican culture—and its light to be a metaphor for the healing throughout the story,” Verduzco told Vogue.

Selena Gomez fans are especially excited about this project because Gomez has long hinted at her desire to release a Spanish-language album.

Back in 2011, Gomez tweeted about her plans to eventually record an entire album in Spanish. “Can’t wait for y’all to hear the Spanish record;) it’s sounding so cool,” she wrote.

She retweeted the sentiment on Thursday with the comment: “I think it will be worth the wait”–which many fans took as confirmation that a full studio album is on its way.

It’s worth noting that Gomez has already dipped her toe into the Latin music scene with 2010’s “Un Año Sin Lluvia” and 2018’s DJ Snake, Ozuna and Cardi B collab, “Taki Taki”.

As for the difficulty of recording songs in a second language, Gomez said that it was a practice that came naturally.

“I actually think I sing better in Spanish. That was something I discovered,” she said in an interview for Apple Music. “It was a lot of work, and look, you cannot mispronounce anything. It is something that needed to be precise, and needed to be respected by the audience I’m going to release this for.”

She continued: “Of course I want everyone to enjoy the music, but I am targeting my fan base. I’m targeting my heritage, and I couldn’t be more excited.”

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Bad Bunny Talks Depression And Says Sometimes He Still Feels Like The Boy Who Bagged Groceries Back Home

Entertainment

Bad Bunny Talks Depression And Says Sometimes He Still Feels Like The Boy Who Bagged Groceries Back Home

Kevin Mazur/Getty Images

Bad Bunny is on top of the world. Or, at least, that’s how it appears to all of us on the outside enjoying his record-breaking year. Not only did he release three albums in 2020 but he also landed his debut acting role in the Netflix series Narcos: Mexico and from his Instagram stories, he seems to be in a happy, contentful relationship.

But like so many others, Bad Bunny has his experience with mental health issues, of which he recently opened up about in an interview with El País.

Bad Bunny recently spoke up about his struggle with depression.

Despite his immense success that’s catapulted him to, arguably, the world’s biggest superstar, Bad Bunny admits that sometimes he still feels like the young man who bagged groceries in a supermarket.

The reggaetonero revealed in an interview with El País that right as his career really started to take off, he was not happy. “You asked me before how I hadn’t gone crazy. Well, I think that was the moment that was going to determine if I was going to go crazy or not. From 2016 to 2018 I disappeared, I was stuck in a capsule, without knowing anything. The world saw me, but I was missing,” he said.

Although no doctor diagnosed him, he is sure of what was happening. it only did he feel lost and empty but he had stopped doing many of the things that brought him joy, like watching movies and boxing. Without realizing it, he had also fallen out of contact with much of his family, with whom he was typically very close.

“And that’s when I said: who am I? What’s going on?” he told El País. When he returned home to Puerto Rico from spending time in Argentina, he was able to get back into the right state of mind and remember who he was.

Despite his success, Bad Bunny still worries he’s in financial trouble.

Although today, he is the number one Latin artist on Spotify and the awards for his music keep coming, there are times when Bad Bunny still thinks that he has financial problems.

“Not long ago, I was 100% clear in my head what I have achieved, maybe a year or six months ago; but until then, many times I forgot, I felt that I was the kid from the supermarket. He would happen something and say: “Hell!” And then: “Ah, no, wait, if I have here,” he said, touching his pocket.

Much like Bad Bunny, J Balvin has also been candid about his own mental health struggles.

Bad Bunny is just the most recent to speak to the emotional havoc he experiences despite being a global superstar. And, thankfully, like many other celebrities, he’s been able to find refuge in a reality that allows him to keep his feet on the ground so that he too can enjoy the achievements of his career.

Much like El Conejo, J Balvin is known for the brightness of his style and mentality. But he’s long addressed the importance of caring for one’s mental health. During his Arcoíris Tour, he encouraged people to not be ashamed of seeking professional help, and let the audience know they are not alone.   

“Las enfermedades de salud mental son una realidad. Yo he sufrido de depresión y he sufrido de ansiedad, así que tengo que aceptarlo. Y eso me hace más humano, me hace entender que la vida tiene pruebas,” Balvin said. “Pero si alguien está pasando una situación difícil, no están solos, siempre llega la luz. Tarde o temprano llega la luz.”  

“Mental health illnesses are a reality. I have suffered from depression and anxiety, so I have to accept it. And this makes me more human. It makes me understand that life has challenges,” Balvin said in Spanish. “But if someone is going through a difficult time, they are not alone, light always comes. Sooner or later, the light comes.”  

We need more men like Benito and J Balvin to speak up about their mental health struggles, to help destroy the stigma that exists within our community.

And in the same interview, he also spoke about why he works to elevate the Spanish language.

As for the possibility of singing in English, the answer remains the same: a resounding no.

“You have to break this view that the gringos are Gods…No, papi,” he told El País. And, although he’s collaborated with artists like Drake, Cardi B and Jennifer Lopez, he has always sang in Spanish and with his famous accent.

“I am very proud to reach the level where we are speaking in Spanish, and not only in Spanish, but in the Spanish that we speak in Puerto Rico. Without changing the accent,” he said.

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