Entertainment

Here’s What Is Coming To Netflix In May And Worth Binge Watching

During this quarantine, I’ve been forever grateful for my ex-boyfriend’s Netflix password. Not but really, Netflix has been helping keep millions of us sane during these super strange times of social distancing and stay-at-home orders.

The streaming giant has continued to offer thousands of new and exciting titles to watch every month, and May is no different. Along with new seasons of some of our favorite original series like La Casa de Las Flores (Ok, yea it came out in April but it’s still worth mentioning), Netflix also has lots of original movies (including several Spanish-language films) coming out this month.

If you’re worried about having plans, Netflix has more than enough to keep you covered. Check out the full list of titles ahead.

Hollywood

Few shows are getting as much buzz as Ryan Murphy‘s highly anticipated new original series, Hollywood. Set in post-World War II Tinseltown, the miniseries draws on true stories like those of actors Anna May Wong, Rock Hudson, and Hattie McDaniel as inspirations for its glamorous revisionist history of what Hollywood might have been if oft-overlooked voices had been given the spotlight. The star-studded cast includes industry veterans like Patti LuPone and Holland Taylor, as well as rising talents like Laura Harrier, David Corenswet and Jeremy Pope. All seven episodes drop on May 1

Chichipato

This hilarious Colombian film by Netflix LatinoAmerica is all set to bring us some much needed laughter amid all the craziness around the world. Basically, a cartel leader is throwing a massive party and has hired a magician to provide some entertainment. However, things don’t go as planned when the magician makes the cartel boss disappear – and he can’t bring him back.

La Corazonada

This Argentine film, another Netflix original, tells the story of a rook cop and police detective’s investigation into the murder of a 19-year-old woman. Her best friend is the suspect but it ma not end up that way…

La Reina de Indias y El Conquistador

This Colombian-produced series revolves around the history that led to the birth of the city of Cartagena de Indias, the flagship of Las Américas. The series is recorded in 4KUltra-high-definition television. The show is filmed in Colombia, specifically in Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, the banks of the Magdalena River and Palomino, Villa de Leyva, and Santa Fe de Antioquia. It stars Essined Rivera Aponte, and Emmanuel Esparza as the main’s characters.

For Colored Girls

A truly strong film by Tyler Perry, this movie portrays the different stories of African American women. It deals with issues and problems faced by women based on a collection of 20 poems by Ntozake Shange.

Rebelión de Los Godinez

Brought to us by Netflix Mexico, this Netflix original film tells the story of a young twenty-something in Mexico City. He’s forced to get a ‘real job’ by his overbearing grandfather – which he’s dreading. But he quickly makes friends with an interesting mix of godinez – or the 9-5 office crowd types.

The Big Flower Fight

This show has been described as ‘The Great British Bake Off’ for plant-lovers and considering that plants are big among Millennials (present company included) this is sure to be a huge hit.

Inhuman Resources

This is a new French series that’s also a Netflix Original and it’s getting obscenely positive reviews from viewers. It centers on the story of Alain, a middle-aged and unemployed man who is lured to an interview at a popular company. But things take a turn to the dark side pretty quick in this thrilling series.

Riverdale: Season 4

An all new season of Riverdale is coming to Netflix and for those of us who are super fans of the series, there’s nothing better than grabbing a bite, getting comfy and just binge watching episode after episode of this way over-the-top TV show.

Trial By Media

Who doesn’t love a true crime series?! In this series, the absolute most sensational trails ever are analyzed with an eye on how the media may have affected decisions.

The show will ponder probably the most sensational and important trials in modern history, including: the remarkable Jenny Jones made-for-Court TV murder trials, the story of Rod Blagojevich’s political fall, and the tragedy of Amadou Diallo, an unarmed African worker who was shot multiple times by police in New York City.

Valeria

This original Netflix series is based on the novels by Elisabet Benavent and tells the story of a writer in a creative and marital crisis. She relies on the help and support of her three close friends who are all on journeys of self-discovery and self-love. Sounds like something we can also try to get into during all of this craziness.

The Lovebirds

While the Coronavirus pandemic prevented the rom-com The Lovebirds from releasing in theaters, the Issa Rae- and Kumail Nanjiani-fronted film will make its debut on Netflix on May 22. And I am a huge ‘Insecure’ fan so I can’t wait to see this.

What are you going to be watching this month?

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Peru’s Indigenous Are Turning To Ancestral Medicines To Fight The Coronavirus

Culture

Peru’s Indigenous Are Turning To Ancestral Medicines To Fight The Coronavirus

Joao Laet / Getty Images

With news headlines like “How Covid-19 could destroy indigenous communities”, it’s hard to understate the affect that the Coronavirus has had on Indigenous communities across the world.

Even before the pandemic hit, native populations were already at increased risk of health complications, poor access to medical care, lack of proper education, and even premature death. The pandemic has only exacerbated these issues as government programs and NGOs who delivered aid to far flung communities have grind to a halt.

However, many communities have started taking the matter into their own hands by creating their own impromptu healthcare systems based on ancestral techniques and others have barricaded off their villages from the outside world in an effort to stem the flow of the virus.

In Peru, many Indigenous communities are turning to centuries-old medicines to fight back against the Coronavirus.

The Coronavirus has had a devastating impact on Peru – the country with the world’s highest per capita Covid-19 mortality rate. At particular risk is the nation’s large Indigenous community, who often lack proper access to education efforts and medical care. This has forced many Indigenous groups to find their own remedies.

In the Ucayali region, government rapid response teams deployed to a handful of Indigenous communities have found infection rates as high as 80% through antibody testing. Food and medicine donations have reached only a fraction of the population. Many say the only state presence they have seen is from a group responsible for collecting bodies of the dead.

At least one community, the Indigenous Shipibo from Peru’s Amazon region, have decided to rely on the wisdom of their ancestors. With hospitals far away, doctors stretch too thin and a lack of beds, many have accepted the alternative medicine.

In a report by the Associated Press, one villager, Mery Fasabi, speaks about gathering herbs, steeping them in boiling water and instructing her loved ones to breathe in the vapors. She also makes syrups of onion and ginger to help clear congested airways.

“We had knowledge about these plants, but we didn’t know if they’d really help treat COVID,” the teacher told the AP. “With the pandemic we are discovering new things.”

One of the plants the Shipibo are using is known locally as ‘matico.’ The plant has green leaves and brightly colored flowers. And although Fasabi admits that these ancestral remedies are by no means a cure, the holistic approach is proving successful. She says that “We are giving tranquility to our patients,” through words of encouragement and physical touch.

Even before the Coronavirus, Indigenous communities were at a greater risk for infectious diseases.

Indigenous peoples around the globe tend to be at higher risk from emerging infectious diseases compared to other populations. During the H1N1 pandemic in Canada in 2009, for example, aboriginal Canadians made up 16% of admissions to hospital, despite making up 3.4% of the population.

Covid-19 is no exception. In the US, one in every 2,300 indigenous Americans has died, compared to one in 3,600 white Americans.

Indigenous groups are particularly vulnerable to dying from Covid-19 because they often live days away from professional medical help. As of July 28, the disease had killed 1,108 indigenous people and there had been 27,517 recorded cases, with the majority in Brazil, according to data published by Red Eclesial Panamazonia (Repam).

Some communities are turning inward to survive COVID-19, barricading villages and growing their own food.

Despite the immense threat they face, Indigenous communities are fighting back.

“I am amazed to see the ways that indigenous peoples are stepping up to provide support where governments have not,” Tauli-Corpuz, a teacher at Mexico’s UNAM, told The Conversation. “They are providing PPE and sanitation, making their own masks, and ensuring that information on Covid-19 is available in local languages, and are distributing food and other necessities.”

They are also choosing to isolate. In Ecuador’s Siekopai nation, about 45 Indigenous elders, adults and children traveled deep into the forest to their ancestral heartland of Lagartococha to escape exposure to the Coronavirus, says the nation’s president Justino Piaguaje.

Despite their best efforts, many experts are extremely concerned for the survival of many Indigenous communities.

Credit: Ginebra Peña / Amazonian Alliance

They are already facing the ‘tipping point’ of ecological collapse due to increased threats of deforestation, fires, industrial extraction, agribusiness expansion and climate change,” Amazon Watch executive director Leila Salazar-Lopez told UNESCO of Amazonian Indigenous groups.

“Now, the pandemic has created one more crisis, and as each day passes, the risk of ethnocide becomes more real.”

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Netflix’s Newest Musical Teen Hit Series Stars a 16-Year-Old Afro-Latina Newcomer

Entertainment

Netflix’s Newest Musical Teen Hit Series Stars a 16-Year-Old Afro-Latina Newcomer

A new teen series has dropped on Netflix that the internet can’t stop talking about. The newest cultural phenomenon that has hit the juggernaut streaming service is a musical series called Julie and the Phantoms, based on the 2011 Brazilian show of the same name.

The series follows a 16-year-old insecure girl named Julie who has lost her love of music after the tragic death of her mother. But with the help of a (stay with us here) band of musical ghosts she stumbles across in her garage, she soon re-discovers her love of singing and performing. Backed by her band of “phantoms”, Julie confidently takes the stage again, blowing everyone away in the process. ,

But the wacky, heartfelt story-line isn’t the only reason people are excited about the show. The buzz around the show is building because its star, 16-year-old newcomer Madison Reyes, is an Afro-Latina singer-actress of Puerto Rican descent.

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Before landing the role of Julie, Reyes was just a regular shmegular Nuyorican girl going to high school in Brooklyn. Needless to say, the process of auditioning for Julie and the Phantoms was both a whirlwind and a game-changer.

“I found out about Julie and the Phantoms through my school. At first I was nervous to send my video in, but after talking to some friends, I sent it in and got a call back,” Reyes told Refinery 29. “From there it was just figuring out when I could fly to L.A. When I finally made it out there, the audition process lasted two days.”

Reyes, for one, understands the burden of her load. “[Julie] is Latin American, she’s got textured hair, she’s a strong and independent female character,” Reyes recently told the LA Times. “As a person of color who wants more diversity [on-screen], I’m kind of scared about the hate comments that I’ve seen other people have to go through, especially women.”

As if having an Afro-Latina actress at the center of a popular Netflix show wasn’t exciting enough, the series is also being helmed by Mexican-American director and all-around legend Kenny Ortega. For those of you unfamiliar with Ortega, he is the creative genius who directed bonafide classics like High School Musical and Hocus Pocus.

Ortega has been publicly effusive in his praise of Reyes. “She has this raw talent that can take on any genre of music, and this promise of greatness that excited everybody,” he told the LA Times. “And yet she’s so relatable and grounded.”

Fans are already calling for a second season after watching the cliffhanger season finale. Reyes, herself, can’t wait to get back in the shoes of Julie. When asked in an interview about where we’ll see her next, she responded: “Hopefully in the next season of Julie and the Phantoms!”. We second that wish.

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