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The Most Adorable Moment Of The Little League World Series Comes Via Venezuela And The Dominican Republic

The Little League World Series brings the best teams of the world together for several days of uninterrupted baseball, which culminate in a game between the United States champs versus the international champs. What happened Monday after the Latin America (Venezuela) vs. Caribbean (Dominican Republic) game showed what baseball and sportsmanship can do to bring people together. After a very competitive game between the two teams, Caribbean pitcher Edward Uceta collapsed in tears on the mound when Latin America player secured a triple play giving Latin America a walk-off victory. In response to Uceta’s reaction, Latin America coaches and players flooded the pitcher’s mound and consoled Uceta.

The Latin America team, represented by Venezuela, scored a 3-2 walk-off victory against the Caribbean team, represented by the Dominican Republic.

Latin America had been trailing Caribbean 2-1 for most of the game. After a very competitive game between the two teams, Caribbean pitcher Edward Uceta collapsed in tears on the mound when a Latin America player hit a triple, giving Latin America a walk-off victory. In response to Uceta’s tears, coaches and players from the opposing team flooded the pitcher’s mound to console Uceta.

The Latin America team was there to support Uceta after a crushing defeat.

CREDIT: 2017 FlashTrendinG / YouTube

“Edward has a big heart. It was sad,” Venezuela manager Alexander Ballesteros told the press, according ABC Sports. “It could have happened to anyone. It could have happened to our own ‘Little [Jose] Altuve’ here, [Romero].”

Just goes to show that no matter how competitive, things might get on the field, there is always time for true sportsmanship.

CREDIT: 2017 FlashTrendinG / YouTube

The kind moment wasn’t lost on the fans, who tend to get pretty competitive on social media.

You just have to respect a competitor who lays it all out on the field during a game.

It truly was a moment of pride for Latinos and baseball fans all over the world.

Bien hecho.


READ: This One Sports Game Is Going To Bring Millions To Mexico City… And It’s Not Soccer

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Boston Red Sox Pitcher Eduardo Rodriguez Suffering From Covid-Related Heart Inflammation

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Boston Red Sox Pitcher Eduardo Rodriguez Suffering From Covid-Related Heart Inflammation

Adam Glanzman / Getty Images

There is still a lot that we do not know about Covid-19 and the longterm effects of the virus. Boston Red Sox pitcher Eduardo Rodriguez is learning the hard way how the virus attacks the body after a patient is “cured.”

The baseball world was excited to welcome Boston Red Sox pitcher Eduardo Rodriguez back.

As the MLB keeps pushing to salvage their Covid-postponed season restart, the virus has shown itself in a different way. After half of the Miami Marlins team tested positive for the virus, a pitcher for the Boston Red Sox is suffering from health issues because of Covid.

Rodriguez is suffering from myocarditis, a heart condition.

The baseball player is suffering from a heart condition that is directly tied to his Covid-19 illness. While Rodriguez survived Covid-19, the heart condition is proof that there is so much more to know about what this virus does. Despite overcoming Covid, Rodriguez is still suffering from the effects of this unknown virus.

The lingering health effect is a reminder of the importance of not contracting the virus.

“That’s the most important part of your body,” Rodriguez told WEEI. “The first time I hear, I was kind of scared a little. Now that I know what it is, I’m still scared, but now I know exactly what it is. I just talk to my mom, talk to my wife, let them know what I have, and now I’ve got to take the rest.”

There is more to Covid-19 than the immediate death and recovery rates.

Health experts and doctors have been warning people about the unknown effects of Covid-19. Rodriguez’s ongoing battle with Covid-19 is a hard reminder that not even the most in shape and athletic people are immune from the devastating effects of the virus. Be safe. Be careful.

READ: Miami Marlins Covid Outbreak Causes Chaos Of MLB Season After One Weekend

Nets Player Kyrie Irving Commits $1.5 Million To Help Pay The Salaries Of WNBA Players Opting Out Of The 2020 Season

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Nets Player Kyrie Irving Commits $1.5 Million To Help Pay The Salaries Of WNBA Players Opting Out Of The 2020 Season

Rob Carr / Getty

While WNBA players were able to receive a modest salary increase in the 2019-20 season, the bump up has yet to give way to the opportunity of true equity. This has proven to be particularly true when their male counterparts of the NBA are thrown into the mix.

Today, the average salary of a WNBA player starts at around $50,000 and caps off at $110,000. On the other hand, a player starting out in the NBA starts out with a salary that averages around $560,000. Currently, amid COVID-19 shutdowns, this massive gap in salary is heavily affecting the WNBA players who are being paid less and opting to forgo playing during the 2020 season.

According to NBC Sports, WNBA executives and athletes have agreed that players who are considered “at-risk” for the COVID-19 virus can opt-out of playing this season and still receive a full paycheck. Meanwhile, those who are not “at-risk” but make the decision not to play will not receive compensation.

Fortunately, many NBA players are aware of the ways in which this disparity affects them differently and are working to support the women who play the game as well.

Brooklyn Nets star Kyrie Irving is leading the charge to ensure that WNBA athletes who opt out of playing this season can do so without worrying about finances. 

The Nets point guard announced in a statement made via his KAI Empowerment Initiative, that he pledges to commit $1.5 million to cover the salaries of WNBA players who have opted out of playing in the 2020 season. As part of his effort, Irving has also partnered with the investment banking company UBS to offer financial literacy programs to each of the players in the WNBA.

“This platform was created to provide support for all WNBA players in hopes to relieve some of the financial strain imposed during these challenging times,” Irving explained in a statement. “Whether a person decided to fight for social justice, play basketball, focus on physical or mental health, or simply connect with their families, this initiative can hopefully support their priorities and decisions.”

Players must provide the reasons behind their decision to not participate in the 2020 season to qualify.

In order to qualify, WNBA players cannot receive any additional financial support from other organizations.

According to CNBC, Irving makes an annual average salary of roughly $34 million and said that he was inspired to start the fund “after WNBA players Natasha Cloud of the Washington Mystics and Jewell Loyd of the Seattle Storm connected him with several of their WNBA peers who discussed some of the challenges they would face if they opted not to play when the season started on July 25.”

Cloud recently announced that she will be committing her time during the season to fight for racial and social justice instead of playing.

Players Renee Montgomery and Tiffany Hayes of the Atlanta Dream, have also confirmed their decision to take part in the fight. In addition, ten other WNBA athletes have also confirmed that they will not be playing this year because of health concerns or other reasons related to the fight for social justice.

Speaking with ESPN’s The Undefeated, Cloud explained, “It’s hard to think about basketball with the climate of what we’re in right now socially after George Floyd was murdered.”