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‘Narcos’ Season 3 Will Tell The Story About One Cartel That Grew Under Escobar’s Shadow

Netflix / YouTube / @narcos / Instagram

“Cocaine cartels are about succession.”

The new trailer for “Narcos” Season 3 is out and the series is going to dive right into the growth of the Cali Cartel after Pablo Escobar’s death in 1993. Javier Peña (Pedro Pascal) kicks things off with a very ominous intro about the Cali Cartel and how it grew while authorities were distracted with taking down Pablo Escobar. The Cali Cartel was a southern Colombian cartel that ended up becoming the largest cocaine cartel in history. According to CNN, the Cali Cartel began to fall apart in 2006, when its two leaders, brothers Miguel and Gilberto Rodriguez Orejuela, were handed 30-year prison sentences after pleading guilty to drug trafficking charges. As part of their plea deal, they surrendered around $2.1 billion in assets from around the world. By 2014, the cartel was considered defunct, reported CNN. The Rodriguez brothers only operated the for two years after Escobar’s death before being arrested, but the series is already promising a pulse-pounding take on the Cali Cartel and the global drug trafficking operation they ran.


READ: Pedro Pascal Talked To Jimmy Kimmel About “Narcos” Season 3’s New Villains

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RIP To George A. Romero, The Director Who Influenced Most Of The Zombie Movies You Love

Entertainment

RIP To George A. Romero, The Director Who Influenced Most Of The Zombie Movies You Love

Michael Tullberg / Getty

Film director George A. Romero died on Sunday after battling lung cancer. He was 77.

CREDIT: Facebook/Thisdayincinema

If you’re not familiar with the work of Romero but love horror films and watch zombie shows, then it’s safe to say that you’ve experienced his unique vision.

One of his most famous films is the 1968 classic “Night of the Living Dead.”

Via: SianDC / YouTube

Back when the movie came out, critics didn’t praise the film. In fact, they wrote it off as silly. But as The New York Times reports, the movie “gained an audience at the late-night drive-in and grindhouse circuit.”

As time passed, the film was celebrated for its sharp social commentary.

In interviews, Romero said the lead character, Ben, was not written as black. But Romero felt Duane Jones was the best actor for the role, which added an extra layer of social commentary to the film. Romero told NPR: “We never thought of it being a racial piece at all, never. We were talking much more about how people remain stuck on their own agendas even though there’s something extraordinary going on outside.”

In 1999, more than 30 years since the release of “Night of the Living Dead,” the movie was added to the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress. Other prestigious films in that registry include Alfred Hitchcock’s “North by Northwest,” Robert Altman’s “McCabe and Mrs. Miller” and Elia Kazan’s “East of Eden.”

Romero was born in the Bronx, New York, in 1940 to a Cuban father and Lithuanian mother.

CREDIT: Facebook/Night Of The Living Dead 247

In 2008, Romero spoke to The New York Daily News about what it was like to grow up in the Bronx.

“But because of our name I was labeled a Latino and I was in an Italian neighborhood, so it was difficult but I still had good times.”

He also talked about wanting to visit Cuba, the homeland of his father.

I think I can go back now. Living in Toronto, Canada, I think I can get down there. I’d really love to,” Romero said in 2008. “We went to Cuba right before Castro. [My father] still had his family there. We went a couple of times to visit his family in the summer time when I was off school. I was in my midteens.”

In the 1960s, Romero began his filmmaking career shortly after graduating from the College of Fine Arts at Carnegie Mellon University.

His first film was a short titled “Expostulations” and was released in 1962. Six years later, he released his groundbreaking film “Night of the Living Dead.” Then came “Dawn of the Dead,” as well as “The Crazies and Martin.”

Romero also directed “Day of the Dead.”

Via: Arrow Video / YouTube

His style of directing and fascination with zombies and the dead have inspired countless of shows and movies we have seen today.

Director Edgar Wright (“Baby Driver,” “Shawn of the Dead”) said all of his movies are inspired by Romero’s vision.

CREDIT: http://www.edgarwrighthere.com/

In a very touching post, Wright talked about how much he looked up to Romero and admired his work.

“I had been infatuated about George’s work before I saw it, scouring through horror and fantasy magazines for stills, posters, and articles way before I was old enough to see his movies,” Wright said. “Without George, at the very least, my career would have started very differently.”

Robert Kirkman, creator of “The Walking Dead,” also credited Romero with inspiring him to create the popular comic and TV series.

Director Zack Snyder (“300,” “Watchmen,” “Batman v Superman”) described Romero as a “master.”

And Jordan Peele, director of the popular horror film “Get Out,” also tipped his cap to Romero.

READ: 17 Perfectly Creepy Horror Movies By Latinos To Watch Before You Die

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