Entertainment

Selena Quintanilla’s Sister Says The Dress Scene From The Movie Sadly Wasn’t Just A Story

A classic scene in the 1997 film “Selena” is when the Tejano queen is shopping for a dress at a high-end boutique for the Grammy Awards. The scene features a pretty classic “Pretty Woman” moment that so many women of color can relate to. While shopping in a store, Selena is told by a shop employee that she will not be able to afford the dress that she was looking at and wanted to try on. Obviously, the woman was racially profiling the Latina and didn’t recognize her as the famous pop star she was. The shop employee later gets her just deserts when she sees Selena surrounded by fans, all clamoring for an autograph.

Famously, the scene ends with Selena declining to buy the dress and the shop employee realizing that she messed up big time.

As much as we love that scene, we’ve now found out that it didn’t exactly go down the way we thought.

Instagram / @Selena.daily

On July 30th, Selena fan Insta page, Selena.daily, posted a clip from a 2012 live stream where Selena’s siblings talked about that infamous dress scene. In the video, Suzette and A.B. Quintanilla explained that the interaction between Selena and a rude shop employee wasn’t just a one-time occurrence. Like many Black and brown people, Selena was racially profiled several times while out shopping with friends and family.

In the live stream, A.B. reads a question from a fan asking if the dress incident was a real thing that happened or if it was made up for the movie.

Instagram / @Selena.daily

“It happened with me, too” A.B. exclaims in the video. “They were following us ⁠— some security guards. We were in a Macy’s and Selena ⁠— she always picked me to go shopping with her, man. So I went with her when (Suzette) wasn’t around and so I’m with her and some security guard is following us… She turns around towards the guy and says, ‘Can I help you!? We’re not going to steal anything!'”

Like so many Black and brown people, she was being racially profiled by security because she didn’t fit the “look” of someone who would be shopping at the store. It’s hard to imagine that someone as famous as Selena would have this happen to her too but, when it comes to racists and racial profiling, the only thing that matters is skin color.

Suzette shared the reason why she thought Selena was probably the victim of profiling more often than once.

Twitter / @4Prina

Suzette talked about memories of her sister; how she would dress and how she would react when she found herself in these situations.

“I think that Selena’s thing was that Selena always dressed in jeans and a tee-shirt and she always had her hair in a low bun. You know, she would get mad when people would stereotype her.”

The public usually sees celebrities dressed up and looking like they’ve come off the red carpet. Selena wasn’t one of those celebrities. She was an ordinary girl who felt most at home in a pair of jeans. Due to this, it was easy for security guards and shop employees to mistake her for a non-celebrity. However, whether they aren’t famous or they are, the profiling of people of color is very real (it even happened to Oprah recently!) and it remains something that regularly happens decades later.

The current racial profiling by ICE has become especially dangerous and is something that should be outlawed.

Twitter / @RAICESTEXAS

Raids done by US Customs and Border Protection and ICE are racially motivated. Agents see groups of Black or brown people and identify these gatherings as possible targets to be detained. Places like buses, bars, restaurant kitchens, and nail salons are being targeted by these officers because they are identified as places that minorities frequent. It’s not a precise investigation as much as it’s a fishing net to capture for undocumented migrants.

The same happened to Francisco Erwin Galicia when he was illegally detained by ICE for three weeks. The teenager was just walking down the street with his brother when he was stopped and jailed by officers of ICE. Despite being a natural-born citizen, Galicia physically fit the stereotype of an undocumented immigrant so he became an easy target.

While that dress scene in “Selena” is one of the most satisfying parts of the movie, it points out a very real problem in our current society. We can’t help but wonder: If Selena was alive and well today, would she be as vulnerable to these illegal raids as so many of us are?

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Alaina Castillo’s New TikTok Trend Is Empowering People To Embrace Their Latinidad

Culture

Alaina Castillo’s New TikTok Trend Is Empowering People To Embrace Their Latinidad

Not everyone has the privilege of growing up surrounded by their cultura, with parents there to pass on knowledge of traditions and customs from home. That, combined with heavily opinionated internet trolls, has led to many people struggling to feel confident in their identity. In a digital world that tries to force us all to fit into boxes, what does “Latino enough” mean and how do you know if you’re there?

Recently, we asked our Instagram community “what does being Latino mean to you?” and although some responses had details in common, for the most part they were as unique as every member of the community itself. There is no one definition of Latinidad, and therefore there is no way to measure what exactly makes someone “Latino enough.”

We got the chance to talk to Alaina Castillo, musical artist and TikTok Queen, about how she identifies with Latinidad and what this TikTok trend means to her. Did we mention quarantine has not stopped her from dropping new music? Check out her latest single, “tonight”!

IMAGE COURTESY OF ALAINA CASTILLO

What does being Latina mean to you? – mitú

“It means that I have something to identify with and be proud of because of my family members, my culture, and the things that I participate in as a Latina.” – A.C.

Side note, this was a personal reminder that we represent the community wherever we occupy space, whether we realize it or not. We are all participating in things as members of the community.

What’s something that, as a Latina, you are proud of? – mitú

“The strength and endurance that we have. I’ve seen it in my dad, his family, and so many others and it makes me feel proud as well as encouraged to achieve my goals with the same mindset as them.” – A.C.

While they may not be perfect (and let’s face it, who is?), our parents are the definition of hard working. Remembering that their blood runs through my veins always keeps me going when the going gets tough. Si se puede!

What Latino figures inspire you? – mitú

“Selena, even though she was an artist that I didn’t really grow up listening to. When I found out who she was, she was someone who I related to because she was a Mexican-American learning to speak and sing in Spanish, while breaking a lot of barriers that people had set up around her.” – A.C.

La Reina del Tex-Mex was a trailblazer indeed! Who else could forget Selena’s iconic “diecicuatro” blurb when she appeared in an interview with Cristina Saralegui? The important thing to focus on is that she was TRYING! As long as we’re all working on improving and being the best versions of ourselves, that’s the best we can do, and it’s okay to make mistakes along the way.

IMAGE COURTESY OF ALAINA CASTILLO

Name one meal that, no matter where you have it, always reminds you of home. – mitú

“Homemade tamales!!!! 100%” – A.C.

You know we love some good tamales, so naturally our next question was…

Where is your family from? – mitú

“My dad is from Mexico and my mom is from Ohio.” – A.C.

Mmmm…Mexican tamales 😋

Have you ever been to those places? – mitú

“Yes, both places. I went to Mexico when I was really young, maybe about two times, and then I’ve traveled to Ohio on various occasions to see family. I was young each time I went to those places so they’re little memories I think of when I miss my family.” – A.C.

What would you say is the most “Latino” item in your home? – mitú

“We have these blankets from my grandma that I grew up using. I thought they were normal blankets but then I saw on social media that almost every Latino household has some and I was like hmmm, what do you know?” – A.C.

IMAGE COURTESY OF ALAINA CASTILLO

What would you say to people who think that not speaking Spanish makes you less Latino? – mitú

“I think it’d definitely be nice to know the language fluently but some people aren’t taught Spanish growing up and that’s not their fault. Not speaking the language doesn’t mean that they don’t have the same customs or should be rejected from the culture that their family is from. I decided to learn on my own because I’ve always been interested in Spanish, and also so I could speak with my family and I see that’s what a lot of other people are doing too.” – A.C.

One more time for the people in the back: not speaking Spanish doesn’t make you any less Latino.

How do you celebrate your Latinidad? – mitú

“With pride. I wouldn’t be who I am today without influences from my family so it’ll always be something I carry with me and proudly show throughout my life and career.” – A.C.

What do you hope people take away from this trend? – mitú

“That Latinidad is something you’re born with and it can’t ever be taken away from you,” – A.C.

So forget about the opinions of other people! All they’re doing is projecting their beliefs onto you and that is not an actual reflection of who you are. We hope you are inspired to embrace your Latinidad on your own terms, and that you walk more confidently in your identity. So duet us on TikTok and don’t forget to use the hashtag #AreYouLatinoEnough to join in on the fun!

Did we mention quarantine has not stopped Alaina Castillo from dropping new music? Check out her latest single, “tonight,” below!

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Latinas Shared The Movies And Shows That Made Them Feel Seen

Entertainment

Latinas Shared The Movies And Shows That Made Them Feel Seen

Nickelodeon

It’s no secret that over the past few decades, people of color worked to fight for equal representation on screens both big and small. While, of course, there have been great POC and LGTBQ relationships on television there’s really been a spike in the spectrum of representation since our early years watching television and learning about relationships.

Recently, we asked Latinas on Instagram what shows and movies featured their favorite most diverse couples.

And the answers threw us for a time loop!

Check them out below!


“Maria and Luis on Sesame Street.”- melissa_phillips71


“Whitney Houston and Kevin Costner is The Bodyguard, they reminded me of my parents and they loved to play the soundtrack.” –millenialmarta


“The leads in Someone Great, Jane and Michael the virgin and the lesbian relationship Gentrified. It’s been 30 years and I finally found characters I can relate to.” –allyss_abyss_

“Most definitely, “Brooklyn 99”: two female Hispanics as regulars and a white person playing a Hispanic (Andy Samberg’s character’s last name is Peralta, which is a Spanish surname).” – seadra2011

“Holt and Kevin(and Rosa Diaz) have changed the way people have perceived gay couples and gay people. Nine Nine!” –chaoticbiguy


“The first on-screen presence that made me feel seen/represented period was @justinamachado ‘s character on One Day At A Time. A Latina veteran struggling with her mental health while trying to juggle school, work, love, and family? And as a main character? Whew….“-vieja.metiche

“Taína! It was on Disney if I remember correctly?? Then @americaferrera in sisterhood of the traveling pants as Carmen. 😭❤️ her life was like mine. Growing up in suburbs but never really having a place culturally.. but my girlfriends still had my back no matter our background.” –chessy__a

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