Entertainment

Brock Turner’s Victim, Who Wrote Of Her Horrifying Rape By A Dumpster In An Impact Statement, Is Publishing A Book

In 2015, the story of Stanford University student and rapist, Brock Turner’s sexual assault of an unconscious woman went viral. His victim had written a heart-rendering impact statement that went viral and dominated headlines for months and while it occurred just before the #Metoo movement, there’s no denying it has had a profound impact on the ways similar rape trials have been addressed since.  Turner was then charged after two Stanford graduate students witnessed the assault taking place while they were riding bicycles near the college campus. 

When the case drew nationwide attention, Turner’s victim remained unnamed. For the last three years, the sexual assault survivor had only been  known to the public as “Emily Doe.” Now, she’s releasing her first book and reclaiming not only her truth but her identity as well. 

In a profile published in the New York Times, “Emily Doe” wants you to know her real name: Chanel Miller.

(Photo Credit: New York Times)

According to the New York Times, Miller’s case made headlines after BuzzFeed had published the statement she read at the sentencing hearing for Brock Turner and essentially, that statement is what got her the book deal. The editor in chief of Viking, the book’s publisher, tells the NYT that she remembers being in her kitchen, reading “this incredible, riveting piece of work.” Afterward, a literary agent representing Miller contacted the EIC of Viking to say her client was interested in writing a book. Four years later, and Miller is now celebrating the publication of her first memoir, “Know My Name.”

“The process of writing “Know My Name” was also, in part, a way for Ms. Miller to piece together the totality of what happened the night she was assaulted,” writes the New York Times. “She read pages of court documents and transcripts of witness testimonies she had not been allowed to hear during the trial.” Miller began writing the book in 2017. 

The cover art for Miller’s memoir also holds significant meaning. It was inspired by the Japanese art of kintsugi or “golden repair” in which “broken pottery pieces are mended using lacquer and powdered gold.” 

The meaning of the cover art is meant to symbolize and represent Miller’s recovery from the sexual assault and the trauma of the trial said the publisher.

Brock Turner was convicted in 2016 of sexually assaulting “Emily Doe” appealed his convictions and requested a new trial in December of last year. In March of 2016, Turner was found guilty on three felony counts: assault with intent to commit rape of an intoxicated or unconscious individual, the penetration of an intoxicated individual and the penetration of an unconscious individual. 

Turner’s conviction caused national outrage, mostly because of Miller’s letter.

According to CNN,  Turner’s lawyers filed an appeal with California’s 6th District Court of Appeal in 2017 claiming that their client was “denied due process” and called the conviction “fundamentally unfair.” 

Unfair? Brock Turner spent only three months in jail. But the public wasn’t surprised. After all, this was a white male being accused of sexual assault. That basically says it all. According to CNN, Turner was released for “good behavior” and only served half of his sentence. However, as part of his sentence, he still has to “register for life as a sex offender.”

 In 2018, CNN reported that Turner lost his appeal in the case. 

Miller also went on to give her first public interview to “60 Minutes” where she also read her victim impact statement from the sentencing hearing. 

People on social media are also already rallying behind Chanel Miller by showing her support and expressing their excitement over the release of her new book.

One Twitter user said she “got goosebumps” over the news of Miller revealing her identity. “She deserves the world,” she added. 

Another woman on Twitter called her an “American hero.” 

In another tweet, Ella Dawson went on to say that her testimony at Brock Turner’s trial, published anonymously in 2016, “paved the way for #MeToo and exposed the sickening treatment rape survivors receive from the justice system.” 

Others also began criticizing not only 60 Minutes for their language in a tweet but media in general for the way they continue to cover this case.

In the tweet 60 Minutes shared of Miller’s first interview since the case, they referred to Brock Turner as the “Stanford swimmer” instead of calling him what he is: a rapist. Danielle Campoamor on Twitter retweeted the original 60 Minutes post and said, “Hey 60 minutes you spelled ‘RAPIST’ wrong.”

Social Media Manager for Voto Latino, Mariah Castañeda also echoed the sentiment of the irresponsible way media outlets continue to humanize Brock Turner by not referring to him as a rapist. 

“Chanel Miller is one brave badass for publicly reclaiming her identify after how horrible y’all treated her as [Emily Doe],” Castañeda writes on Twitter. “And f*ck all news outlets that refer to her rapist as the ‘Stanford Swimmer.'” 

Ultimately, it’s clear mainstream media still has a lot to learn when it comes to the right way to treat survivors of sexual assault (and women in general for that matter) compared to their abusers. 

Another woman on Twitter noticed how Brock Turner is the one trending on Twitter and again, still being referred to as “Stanford Swimmer” when it’s Chanel Miller that we should be highlighting and uplifting. “She deserves better,” the woman wrote. 

“Know My Name” is scheduled for a release date of September 24. 

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From FBI Raids To Felony Charges: It Was A Bad Week For YouTubers

Entertainment

From FBI Raids To Felony Charges: It Was A Bad Week For YouTubers

iamalexstokes / jakepaul / Instagram

It’s been a bad week for some of the world’s most popular YouTubers. Jake Paul and the Stoke twins are dealing with law enforcement and it’s not in their favor. Here’s what happened this week with some of your faves.

Jake Paul, brother of problematic Logan Paul, had the FBI raid his home this week.

The FBI raided Jak Paul’s Calabasas home in connection with the riot at the Scottsdale Fashion Square in Arizona. Paul claimed not to be involved in the rioting and looting though he admits it looks like he was on camera. The YouTuber claims that he was just trying to find the George Floyd protests and was hoping to figure out from being at the Scottsdale Fashion Square.

The raid is tied to the riot in Scottsdale, Arizona that Paul was involved with.

Scottsdale Police first issued arrest warrants and charges for Paul and his friends in connection to the riot but have since dismissed them without prejudice. According to the police department, the charges were dropped so that that FBI could complete their own investigation into Paul. The guns seized from his home were not the reason the FBI raided the home and are currently in Los Angeles Sherrif’s Department, according to TMZ. The guns can be retrieved if Paul can show that he owns them with proof of purchase.

The Stokes Twins are also facing some serious charges from law enforcement.

Alan and Alex Stokes are famous for their prank videos. However, one of their prank videos from last October has gotten them into a lot of trouble. The twins are each facing one felony count of fake imprisonment affected by violence, menace, fraud, or deceit, and one demeanor count of falsely reporting an emergency.

The twins filmed a prank in October 2019 where they dressed in all black with ski masks and carried duffle bags full of cash. According to a press release from Orange County district attorney’s office, the twins ordered an Uber and the driver refused to drive them thinking they had committed a crime. A witness called the police and when the police arrived they ordered the Uber driver out of his car with guns drawn. Police let the driver go when it was determined he was not involved.

The twins are facing four years in jail for the prank.

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Caption this 😂

A post shared by Alex Stokes (@imalexstokes) on

“These were not pranks,” Orange County District Attorney Todd Spitzer said in the press release. “These are crimes that could have resulted in someone getting seriously injured or even killed. Law enforcement officers are sworn to protect the public and when someone calls 911 to report an active bank robbery they are going to respond to protect lives. Instead, what they found was some kind of twisted attempt to gain more popularity on the internet by unnecessarily putting members of the public and police officers in danger.”

Be careful with your pranks, kids. You never know when your jajajas will turn to crimes because of a lack of foresight.

READ: The World’s Highest-Paid YouTuber Made $29 Million In 2019 And Their Identity May Surprise You

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Latinas Are Opening Up On Instagram About Why They Didn’t Report Their Sexual Assault And The Stories Are Heartbreaking

Fierce

Latinas Are Opening Up On Instagram About Why They Didn’t Report Their Sexual Assault And The Stories Are Heartbreaking

Drew Angerer / Getty

TRIGGER WARNING for victims of assault.

Recently we came across six stories by women who opened up about why they didn’t report their sexual assault via the account @whyididntreport. Heartbreaking, tragic, and also empowering each of these stories were a reminder that not only do we need to believe women but also support them.

As a response to the posts, we asked Latinas what experiences they had with keeping quiet about their assaults.

See their stories below.

Because it was a family member

@whyididntreport / Instagram

“My mom did not believe me because it was her husband … we would always fight and he would put her against me … that’s why I always say my children will always come first … then anyone … even before me and my own needs.” – soley_geez

Because of the statute of limitations

@whyididntreport / Instagram

“I did report. The cop taking notes told me they couldn’t file the report because of the statue of limitation being 10 years. I was reporting 13 years after I was raped. I was 3 years old when it happened. I was 16 when I reported.” – jedi_master_evila

Because she’d been labeled dramatic

@whyididntreport / Instagram

“He was my ex boyfriends cousin and I was intoxicated after a night of partying with a group of friends. I said no over and over again. I never came forward because I was already labeled/seen as “dramatic” by my ex and his friends and figured they wouldn’t believe me.” – love.jes

Because she was punished by her parents

@whyididntreport / Instagram

“I was 12. He was 18. My parents found a note he wrote to me. They spoke harshly with him but never pressed charges and punished me for lying.” 0valicorn_rainbow_pants

Because it was someone she thought loved her

@whyididntreport / Instagram

“I had a boyfriend rape me after I confronted him about lying and cheating. He used it as a way to punish me. And I stayed with him a year after the fact. I’m still processing feelings almost 20 years later. I’ve gone through self-destructive behaviors and tried to push others away. I’m forever grateful my husband showed me I am worthy of a beautiful life even after trauma. To all my fellow trauma survivors…we are worthy of good things.” – thebitchyhippie559

She thought she deserved it

@whyididntreport / Instagram

“He was my “step” grandfather. He molested me from ages 5-10, I was having some rebellious teen years and my parents were trying to find out why. I told them, my dad didn’t talk to me for a few days and after that everyone pretended that nothing happened and the rest of my family never found out. I held on to this secret until I told my parents at about 16 or 17 I was always so embarrassed and thought I deserved it.” – klemus09

She didn’t want to ruin HIS life

“It was my boss. At 15 I felt so bad, bc the wife was the only other person working with us and I was more worried about what this could do to their marriage. I thought I healed but typing this was hard.” –dolores.arts

If you or someone you know needs to report sexual assault, please contact the National Sexual Assault Helpline 800.656.4673 or speak with someone you trust.⁠⠀

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