Entertainment

These Successful Latinas Dish Their Best Advice

It’s Women’s History Month, which means that we get to reflect on the women making history this year, and hope to make the list the next year. Being a Latina woman puts us up against unique stereotypes with unique backgrounds. There is no singular Latina experience.

These women have shared how they shaped their experience of success as a Latina in a white world. Whether you want to climb to the top of the entertainment industry, politics, law, or advocacy, prepare to be inspired.

Jennifer Lopez on loving yourself.

CREDIT: @jlo / Instagram

In her own memoir, “True Love,” brilliant, filthy rich Jenny from the Block wrote,

“As women, we almost never give ourselves enough credit for what we’re capable of, for what we endure and how giving we are.
Part of loving yourself is about forgiving yourself – which is something I’ve always struggled with. It’s the messy parts that make us human, so we should embrace them too – pat ourselves on the back for getting through them rather than being angry for having gotten into them in the first place. Because loving yourself is ultimately about self-acceptance, about embracing every part of who you are. And that’s never just one thing.”

Frida Kahlo on knowing yourself.

CREDIT: @ReadingInHeels / Instagram

Kahlo famously once said, “I am my own muse, I am the subject I know best. The subject I want to know better.” May we all strive to yearn for our true selves above anyone else. This is why she is an icon.

Cardi B on the meaning of feminism.

CREDIT: @iamcardib / Instagram

We all love Cardi B, and fell hard when she told Billboard, “Being a feminist is such a great thing and some people feel like someone like me can’t be as great as that. But then some people are smart but they don’t have no common sense. They think feminism is great and only a woman that can speak properly, that has a degree, who is a boss, a businessperson… they think only Michelle Obama can be a feminist. But being a feminist is real simple; it’s that a woman can do things the same as a man. I’m equal to a n—-. Anything a man can do, I can do. I can finesse, I can hustle. We have the same freedom. I was top of the charts. I’m a woman and I did that. I do feel equal to a man.”

Laurie Hernandez on self-empowerment.

CREDIT: @lauriehernandez / Instagram

The world was watching as 16-year-old Puerto Rican American Laurie Hernandez took to the beam in the 2016 Olympics. That’s why we noticed her whisper “you got this” just before she freaking nailed it. #NewMantra

Selena Quintanilla on breaking glass ceilings.

CREDIT: @athena_vintage / Instagram

Selena shattered all expectations of the male-dominated Tejano scene, but not without difficulty. She once said, “Tejano music was hard for us because I was a girl. My dad had a lot of problems while trying to set up shows for us because there are a lot of men who don’t think that women can get the attention of the public. But … WRONG!”

Sonia Sotomayor on the power of a Latina perspective.

CREDIT: @wes_sherman / Instagram

The first Latina Supreme Court Justice overcame all odds. She was raised by an alcoholic parent, who died when she was just eight years old, and still managed to get into Princeton and then Yale Law school. When conservatives were criticizing her for parading herself as a “wise Latina,” she famously responded with this very legalese clapback:

“I would hope that a wise Latina woman with the richness of her experiences would more often than not reach a better conclusion than a white male who hasn’t lived that life.”

Justina Machado on finding humor in a political world.

CREDIT: @justinamachado / Instagram

No question, “One Day at a Time” actress, Justina Machado, is the first to call Trump a pendejo. That said, when a pendejo is criticizing you, the best clapback can be to just say, boy bye.

“I’m a wise Latina woman. Whatever, man. Thank God I’m not in politics, because the fact that you have to explain everything – I’d kill myself. I can’t take all those little things they dissect. I’m like, ‘Oh my God, get a life.’ I don’t have time for this.”  ????

Rita Moreno on authenticity.

CREDIT: @femaleACEs / Instagram

The 86-year-old award-winning actress has gifted us with her memoir and the inspo for us all to start our own: “If you’re going to write about your life, you must write about your life.” There are so many ways to interpret this, but my takeaway is that your life is unique. Cross-referencing anyone else’s will lead you astray from your goal. Be you, boo.

America Ferrera on body positivity.

CREDIT: @americaferrera / Instagram

We know her beginnings from “Real Women Have Curves” and her message stays true. “To me, the tragedy about this whole image-obsessed society is that young girls get so caught up in just achieving that, they forget to realize that they have so much more to offer the world.”

As Latinas, we’re far less likely to be naturally supermodel thin and our beautiful thoughts are more likely to be robbed by diet culture. Time to reclaim our fat, juicy brains and take up space.

Naya Rivera on having an eating disorder as a Latina.

CREDIT: @nayarivera / Instagram

In her memoir, “Sorry, Not Sorry,” the “Glee” actress opened up about her eating disorder and how her mom took it:

“I finally worked up the nerve to tell my dad that I thought I was anorexic, which was a slap in the face to my parents. I don’t think that either of them had even known anyone with an eating disorder before, and while they knew it was a big deal, they still had no idea what to do about it. At one point my mom even said, “Naya, this is some white-people shit.””

Dolores Huerta on how girls are bred to serve.

CREDIT: @doloreshuerta / Instagram

Dolores Huerta was the lead negotiator in the labor contracts between migrant farm workers and Big Ag. New moms, here’s how you make a Dolores Huerta:

“My mother never made me do anything for my brothers, like serve them. I think that’s an important lesson, especially for the Latino culture, because the women are expected to be the ones that serve and cook and whatever. Not in our family. Everybody was equal.”

Mariah Carey on turning struggles into achievements.

CREDIT: @mariahcarey / Instagram

Mariah Carey is most known as the Queen of Christmas, but many might not know that she’s battling bipolar II disorder. She told People magazine,

“I’m hopeful we can get to a place where the stigma is lifted from people going through anything alone. It can be incredibly isolating. It does not have to define you and I refuse to allow it to define me or control me.”

Eva Longoria on raising feminist men.

CREDIT: @evalongoria / Instagram

It’s no secret Longoria is a feminist. I had the honor of hearing her speak at the Women’s March when she called for radical change to the corporate bottom line, to elected positions, and systematic change to include women in America’s wealth. On Instagram, she announced that she was having a boy with this caveat:

“This boy, my son, will be surrounded by very strong, educated, powerful women and I think it’s important that he sees those types of role models in his life so he knows how to support it, how to applaud it and how to honor it.”

Gina Rodriguez on “busting that b*tch down.”

CREDIT: @hereisgina / Instagram

The star of “Jane the Virgin” knows what rejection feels like. It feels like fuel to f*ck sh*t up when you finally get that chance to make your dreams come true.

“Yes, there are 150 doors that are going to slam in your face, but there’s going to be the one with a little crack in it, and you’re going to bust that b*tch down.”

Salma Hayek on being gentle with yourself.

CREDIT: @salmahayek / Instagram

We’re all competing for the status of exhaustion in this world, but Hayek suggests competing for your happiness in this world. She told Stylist, “You have to believe in yourself. You have to take care of yourself, work for yourself, believe in yourself, and also be patient with yourself. Learn when not to push too hard, and give yourself a break.”

Selena Gomez on healing old wounds.

CREDIT: @selenagomez / Instagram

Gomez is probably the most successful young Latina out here, but she’s human, too. At the American Music Awards in 2016, she told America, “If you are broken, you do not have to stay broken.”

Carmen Yulín Cruz on scrapping the “play nice” prescription for women in politics.

CREDIT: @muerto2go / Instagram

San Juan Mayor Cruz has become a household name in the aftermath of Hurricane María. Here’s how she did that:

“Politics is a rough game, and sometimes as females we are taught that you have to play nice. Sometimes you can’t play nice.”

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on breaking the mold.

CREDIT: @thehill / Instagram

In an interview with “Girls Who Code,” AOC opened up:

“When you’re only seeing white dudes just like, running the world, you think you need to act like a white dude to run the world. The problem is that mold wasn’t made for you, and so even if you try the hardest at being that, you will not be as good as someone who is just that already.

That’s why I’ve tried really hard to authentically be myself while I’m here in this moment and in this position, because I want to show other people that there are other ways of being powerful in the world.”

Red lips and hoops, baby. I’m here for it.

Ileana Ros-Lehtinen on unconditional love.

CREDIT: @roslehtinen / Instagram

Ros-Lehtinen (R) is the first Latina to be elected to Congress and has served for thirty years. During her tenure, she’s tackled issues that today’s GOP would staunchly oppose. She raised a trans son and has fought for Marriage Equality. Here’s what she told the Human Rights Campaign:

“It’s important for families to support their children and to support their children’s choices. It’s important to listen to your children, accept your children and have your children know that you love them unconditionally. It’s not “I love you, but …”—there’s no “but.” “It’s just “I love you.”… To do otherwise is—you’re hurting yourself, you’re going to shun your child or grandchild. You’re going to say, “No, I have my views and my views are the perfect views and no one can have a different point of view. I’m right and everything else is wrong.” And that’s a lonely way to live. It just means you’ll be out of that person’s life, and who wants to be cut out of their child’s life?”

MJ Rodriguez on holding herself back.

CREDIT: @REVRYTV / Instagram

MJ Rodriguez tells Paper Magazine about what gave by the time she auditioned for hit series “Pose”:

“Well, want to know something? There was a point in time where I was scared, and I hadn’t gone in for roles before Pose had even started. I had hindered myself by being in the way and thinking that world wouldn’t receive me, and then I stepped out of my way and I started going in for roles as the woman I was. Even though my mindset was “They’re going to say no, they’re not going to want me,” I challenged myself to be 100% who I was and not care what anyone thought, and when I walked into that room and just stepped into myself, the people behind the table didn’t care!”

Believe in yourselves, hunnies, and the rest will follow.

READ: Honor #WomensHistoryMonth With These Latina Rapper Bangers

Street Food Vending And Playing With Fire Are Two Ways To Make Some Extra Cash If You Need Some

Things That Matter

Street Food Vending And Playing With Fire Are Two Ways To Make Some Extra Cash If You Need Some

mitú

Side hustles are the lifeline for some of our friends and family. If you think about it hard enough. You will be able to think of someone in your life who makes most of their money from their side hustle. Well, mitú wanted to know more so we went to the streets to talk to people about their various side hustles.

Who knew that fire dancing was something people would consider a side hustle?

So far, “Side Hustle” co-hosts Sasha Merci and David Alvare have explored a few side hustles that were unexpected. There was the luchador who add some comedy to his costume to stand out. There was also the professional cuddler that we still can’t stop thinking about. She makes $120 an hour just cuddling.

Now, Merci and Alvarez are talking with two more entrepreneurs about their own side hustles that will leave some of you speechless. One of them has to do with food and the other has to do with fire.

Luis Jauregui turned his love for food into the food cart known as Jauregui’s Cravings.

“Nobody was really selling this at all,” Jauregui tells Alvarez. “Anywhere that you see this, you’re not going to see a food cart that’s mobile on the sidewalks. I saw that everyone was selling that (tacos and tamales). If you go here, there are like 5 tamaleros selling tamales. On the other street, there’s like two more.”

Jaurgeui adds: “Nobody was supporting me. It was only her since the very beginning. To be honest, I thought she was going to make fun of me or be like, ‘Nah. Don’t worry about. Just go get a job or something.’ But she was like, ‘If that’s your dream and you chase it, just got for it.'”

Andres Trevino is using his courage to play with fire.

“I had gone to this crazy party in the desert,” Trevino explains to Merci. “I was seeing these crazy people and they were spinning fire and I immediately wanted to do it. I walked up to a guy and I asked him if he would teach me. He was like, ‘Here. Play with it. Nobody taught me. Just go on YouTube.’”

Trevino adds: “It’s trial and error. Well, you know, if you play with fire you do get burned. There’s no shocker there. But, you want to take it very seriously. But, yeah. I’ve burned myself a couple of times.”

READ: ‘Side Hustle’ Episode 2: Nude Modeling And Friend Rentals

Foul-Mouthed Karen Yells At People To Stop Playing Bad Bunny And Play ‘American’ Music Instead

Things That Matter

Foul-Mouthed Karen Yells At People To Stop Playing Bad Bunny And Play ‘American’ Music Instead

Ramon Luis Cancel / Facebook

Puerto Rico is part of the United States. Puerto Ricans are American citizens (without the right to vote). Music made in Puerto Rico would then be considered American music since it is part of the U.S. However, one Karen in Wisconsin just doesn’t understand that and had a complete meltdown.

A very angry white woman went on an expletive-filled rant against people barbecuing in the park because of their music.

My first Karen was today. Todo por que no le gusta la musica que escuchamos 😂 #KarenWantTalkToTheManager Stop Being Racist. To use this video in a commercial player or in broadcasts, please email licensing@storyful.com

Posted by Ramon Luis Cancel on Wednesday, May 20, 2020

A woman made a point recently to verbally attack a Puerto Rican family while barbecuing in a park. What did they do to offend the woman? They were playing Bad Bunny. The woman, who has not been identified, called on the group to play American music because they are in America.

“You are so fucking disrespectful,” the Wisconsin Karen told the group when they called her disrespectful. “Puerto Ricans. Fuck all this.”

During her rant, the group turns on Bad Bunny’s “Safaera” and continued to argue with her.

“Safaera” is one of Bad Bunny’s most popular songs. It would be pretty hard to convince people that this song is something that should be turned off. Like, Why can’t people just enjoy their time out and about without having to get into a racist, xenophobic argument?

Some Puerto Ricans on Twitter made sure to remind her how lucky she is to be in Wisconsin.

This isn’t the first time someone was verbally harassed in a park for showing their Puerto Rican heritage. One man was charged with a hate crime after trying to attack a woman in Chicago who was wearing a shirt with a Puerto Rican flag on it. It is a true testament to their resolve that the Puerto Rican family being yelled at were able to stay calm and level-headed. Granted, they did argue back but it seems they were provoked.

It seems the woman needs a basic civics lesson on how Puerto Ricans are Americans.

A poll conducted by Morning Consult found that half of Americans do not know that Puerto Ricans are U.S. citizens. The confusion has been exacerbated by President Trump during the early stages of Hurricane Maria recovery. The Trump administration has been criticized for its treatment of Puerto Rico.

People commented on the Facebook video about how else the situation could have been handled.

Credit: Ramon Luis Cancel / Facebook

If she wants to hear American music, then let her hear American music. Crank that volume all the way up and let her hear the true range of American music. There’s nothing better than educating someone when they let their ignorance be known.

One person is just feeling bad for the man clearly trying to get the confrontational woman moving.

Credit: Ramon Luis Cancel / Facebook

He really just wants to keep it moving. It is almost like he realized before she did that being on camera saying racist things is not a good look in the time of social media and doxxing.

Smartphones have changed the way we live by giving us a chance to capture moments like this and broadcast them to the world. Social media serves as a way to really make the most out of the public shaming.

READ: Felony Hate Crime Charges Have Been Filed Against The Man Who Harassed A Woman For Wearing A Puerto Rico Flag Shirt