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Alex Rodriguez Opens Up About His Steroid Scandal And What It Means Being Engaged To J.Lo

Alex Rodriguez is one of the most polarizing stars in all of sports. Known for his years as a star of the New York Yankees, Rodriguez is having a resurgence in his career. Rodriguez is now engaged to Jennifer Lopez and a studio analyst for ESPN covering baseball. Before all this, Rodriguez was mired in controversy for using performance-enhancing drugs and violating the MLB’s anti-doping rules. In 2014, Rodriguez was suspended for the entire season for using steroids which was a huge blow to his image. In a new interview with the New York Times, Rodriguez is opening up about the infamous scandal and life with J.Lo.

Three years after his final game, Alex Rodriguez is newly engaged and has become a respected baseball broadcaster.

Rodriguez has completed a full comeback story after being one of the most hated players in baseball due to multiple instances of doping. In his interview with the New York Times, Rodriguez says he looks back at the suspension with a different view than previously.

“When the suspension first happened, I was pissed off at everyone. I was blaming everyone. It wasn’t until I got deeper into it that I said, ‘No, it’s not their fault. It’s your fault,'” Rodriguez said. “I tried to build a certain image while I was playing, and that plan failed miserably. [Now] I have more clarity.”

He also acknowledges his shortcomings when it comes to how he perceived himself through the media. Rodriguez says he worried too much about making things right with the media before taking care of himself.

“Coming out of the suspension, I wanted to be honest, be accurate and be fair with the media — and mix in levity. I could not wait to make fun of myself. Doing that made everybody relax about me,” Rodriguez said. “I’d wake up the next morning thinking I was going to get crushed by them for a mistake I’d made. But then I’d see that they’d barely be talking about my [expletive] up because I’d beat them to the punch. I still think that, for the most part, I had a good relationship with the media, but it became excellent post-suspension.”

Rodriguez opened up about his mixed relationship with fans,which ended on a tough note.

Initially, Rodriguez was hurt by the backlash he received from fans after the suspension. He was labeled as baseball’s “bad-boy” for his actions and attitude he displayed throughout his career. But now Rodriguez looks back at it and agrees he deserves some of that reaction.

“I felt that being the tough guy who had all the answers and being robotic was the right thing to do,” Rodriguez said. “I was wrong, and now I think it’s OK if I say, ‘I don’t know the answer.'”

In cleaning up his image, Rodriguez has also learned to be himself again. He says that in the past he would take things too seriously and try to display himself as someone he really wasn’t.

“Today I showed up here with you, and I didn’t know anything you’d want to talk to me about, and I’d rather have it be that way. Before, I would have studied for six months before sitting down with you,” Rodriguez said. “I wanted to be more buttoned-up and have done due diligence and seen what your angle was. Now I just trust we’re going to have a good conversation, and I go for it.

He also opened up about his recent engagement with J.Lo.

Credit: @cdigests/Twitter

After Rodriguez proposed to Lopez earlier this year, the couple has been the talk of Hollywood ever since. In the interview, he discussed the impact that Lopez has had on his life and what he’s learned from her.

“I’ve never met anyone who’s more honest. She’s so authentic and genuine. It was strange to see someone of such magnitude be so normal, be such a great mother and partner and friend,” Rodriguez said. “How can you be like this and then go perform in front of 80,000 people? But that’s her superpower.”

Rodriguez says Lopez still finds ways to surprise him everyday and is one of the big reasons he loves her. “The other day, Jennifer said something brilliant at, like, 2 in the morning. I reached over to get my notebook, and everything falls on the floor. Then I grabbed it and wrote it down.”

It’s safe to say Rodriguez has come full circle with his career and the roadblocks that prevailed him from being A-Rod. We’re all looking forward to what comes next for both Rodriguez and Lopez.

Read the full article at The New York Times by clicking here.

READ: Jimmy Kimmel Asked Some Real Personal Questions About Alex Rodriguez And J.Lo’s Relationship

Robert Clemente's Jersey Number Hasn't Been Retired But Latino Players Don't Wear It Out Of Respect

Sports

Robert Clemente’s Jersey Number Hasn’t Been Retired But Latino Players Don’t Wear It Out Of Respect

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Few players have gained the respect and iconic status in baseball like Roberto Clemente have. A 15-time All-Star, 12-time Gold Glove Award winner, two-time World Series champion for the Pittsburgh Pirates and a member of the 3,000-hit club, Clemente has a resume that few can match. Unfortunately, Clemente died in a plane crash on Dec. 31, 1972, while helping with earthquake relief from his home of Puerto Rico to Nicaragua. A year later he became the first player from Latin America inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. These reasons alone have made Clemente a legend to so many Latino baseball players. It’s also why so many have refused to ever put on his No. 21 ever again out of respect to Clemente.

Jackie Robinson’s No. 42 is the only jersey number retired across baseball, but many Latino players want Clemente’s jersey to get the same honor.

As well as being great on the field, Clemente was an even better person off of it. He was a huge advocate for Latino players and fought against Jim Crow laws during his era. That advocacy is not lost on players today.

This is why the No. 21 has become, in many ways, a “sacred number” in baseball, especially to Puerto Rican players. According to Baseball Reference, out of the 235 Puerto Rico-born players who have appeared in an MLB game since Clemente’s death 47 years ago, only 16 have used the No. 21 — and none in the past five years.

While Jackie Robinson’s No. 42 is retired and celebrated every April 15th, many think the same should happen with Clemente. Coincidentally, Clemente debuted just two days after Robinson did on April 17, 1955.

“His body of work speaks volumes, so I do think that, as Jackie Robinson represents greatness in baseball and so much more, so does Roberto Clemente, particularly for Latinos all over the world,” Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo A. Rosselló said at an event last year honoring Clemente. “So I think it’s the right time to retire No. 21.”

While it’s been more 40 years since Clemente’s death, many feel now is a great time to honor him.

Latinos have become a growing force in the major leagues and now make up 30 percent of all baseball players. With this growing presence, many feel now is the right time to make Clemente’s jersey retire across baseball.

Despite multiple campaigns and calls for the retirement of the number, there has been little change on the subject. Baseball Commissioner Rob Manfred has resisted the idea of retiring the number. He says the league already honors his legacy with the Roberto Clemente Award, given annually to a player who demonstrates the values that Clemente displayed in his community.

While the No. 21 may not be officially retired, Latino baseball players have in their own special way.

While the Pirates are the only team to have officially retired Clemente’s jersey number, players have chosen to honor him in a different way: by choosing not to wear it all together.

Luis Clemente, the son of Roberto Clemente, has a different idea on honoring his father. He has called for not only a number retirement but a patch on the jersey or hat to be worn by the previous year’s Clemente Award winner. While he hasn’t had official talks with MLB about the proposal, there’s no doubt it would receive support among many Latino players.

“No Puerto Ricans will use the number because of Roberto Clemente,” Houston Astros shortstop, Carlos Correa, 24, told the New York Times. “The way I see it: Roberto Clemente is a figure for Latinos just like Jackie Robinson was for African-Americans. Clemente didn’t just break barriers but inspired other Latinos to get into baseball.”

READ: Trump Put A Stop To The MLB And Cuban Baseball Federation Deal And Here’s Why It Matters

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