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Spike Lee Gave Puerto Rico The Star Treatment In An Episode Of ‘She’s Gotta Have It’ And Everyone Is Screaming Their Approval

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Netflix has not only given voice to new talent but also provided a larger canvas to established filmmakers. Such is the case of the legendary Spike Lee, perhaps the better known African-American director in history. Lee has directed two seasons of the TV version of his debut film “She’s Gotta Have It,” in which a powerful, queer, young African-American woman from Brooklyn discovers the secrets of love, friendship, sex, and art. Nora Darling is a nascent painter who is as smart as she is magnetic, she is a Black queen who has taken full control of her mind, her body and her politics. In one of Season 2’s best episodes, episode 7 titled “#OhJudoKnow”, Nora and her friends visit Puerto Rico to bring some money and resources they collected during a concert to help some hurricane victims. Nora finds herself on the island, and Mars (her ex-lover and now BFF) visits his mother and sister. It is a transformational trip for all involved. Lee also showcased the beauty of the island and its people, as well as showing the struggles that boricuas have faced not only after the natural disaster but also historically. 

These are some of the things that Spike shows us about boricua complexity and belleza, hermano.

Blackness is beautiful and needs to be depicted en todo su esplendor.

Credit: She’s Gotta Have It / Netflix

Spike Lee was one of the first American auteurs to capture the beauty of Black bodies and faces, and he does this in the episode, where the credits roll over amazing portraits of Afro-Caribbeans.

He also shows the devastation that Hurricane Maria brought on the island.

Credit: She’s Gotta Have It / Netflix

This image warms our heart (look at this loving, heroic father), but also makes us incredibly sad as it makes us think of the many tribulations the island has gone over in the past few months since Maria struck.

Lee captures the multiracial identity that makes Puerto Rico the beautiful island and community it is.

Credit: She’s Gotta Have It / Netflix

Spike Lee delves into the processes of colonization that la isla del encanto has gone over for centuries. These processes have resulted in Brown boricua identity, which is combative and festive at the same time.

We love Mars.

Credit: She’s Gotta Have It / Netflix

Mars gives us the rundown of what Puerto Rico is in all its contradictions and colorful melancholy. The Island Of Enchantment… the colors, sounds, and smells are truly hypnotic. 

And no, the Spanish did not “discover” Puerto Rico.

Credit: She’s Gotta Have It / Netflix

There was an established indigenous population when the conquistadores laid foot on the island. They were massacred, enslaved and taken advantage of. Yes, by pinche Cristobal Colon.

Let’s keep it real: Columbus was not a hero.

Credit: She’s Gotta Have It / Netflix

Cristopher Columbus was not the hero that some history books have led us believe, but as Mars argues he was a malnacido mamabicho who basically started a genocide.

Yes, the people of what is now Puerto Rico were dealt a terrible hand.

Credit: She’s Gotta Have It / Netflix

Ever since its inception, Puerto Rico has had to face external, colonizing powers that when tragedy strikes simply throw toilet paper rolls at them (wink, wink).

The episode is full of joyous Puerto Rican music.

Credit: She’s Gotta Have It / Netflix

One of the best stylistic choices that Spike has taken with this show is to actually show the cover of the albums that he takes music from. Gracias, hermano Spike. The episode is full of great salsa and we can create a playlist, no problem.

Puerto Ricans are facing a power outage that doesn’t seem to stop since the hurricanes devastated the island.

Credit: She’s Gotta Have It / Netflix

Puerto Ricans have had to live with a very slow government response and power outages since Maria hit are a common feature of everyday life.

Nevertheless, San Juan is as pretty as ever.

Credit: She’s Gotta Have It / Netflix

Look at the old houses. You can almost smell the wooden furniture and feel the sun on our faces. 

San Juan is synonymous with partaaaaay.

Credit: She’s Gotta Have It / Netflix

Us Latinos sure know how to party even when faced with adversity. We have had to struggle so much that we find joy in the everyday.

San Juan is a street art epicenter.

The district of Santurce was revitalized by allowing muralists and street artists to basically take over walls and create a vibrant, amazing arts district.

Of course, Nora loved it.

Credit: She’s Gotta Have It / Netflix

We mean, look at the nostalgic weirdness of this piece.

There were shots of art that are a testament to boricua women.

Credit: She’s Gotta Have It / Netflix

Can we rent a loft there already? Honestly, we just want to be surrounded by all of the beauty and majesty that is Puerto Rico.

Just stop it, we can’t take so much cool.

Credit: She’s Gotta Have It / Netflix

We can totally see this in any street art hub like Montreal, Melbourne or even Spike Lee’s hometown of Brooklyn.

La Perla!

Credit: She’s Gotta Have It / Netflix

Of course, Spike stopped in the barrio of La Perla, a working-class legendary site where people like the members of Calle 13 have lived.

Spike Lee kept is authentic and real with the same couch all moms and abuelas own.

Credit: She’s Gotta Have It / Netflix

Yes, we all have a relative with an ugly, cheese couch that seems to be the most important thing in the world for them. 

The show proves that arroz is the key to happiness.

Credit: She’s Gotta Have It / Netflix

Family meals are a very important part of life on the island, and in many places of Latin America, Spike Lee captures this beautifully. 

Of course, Rosie Perez serves us some santeria vibes.

Credit: She’s Gotta Have It / Netflix

We adored the casting of legendary Rosie Perez as Mars’ mom. We loved the fact that she is a quirky santera even more. This shows us that religiosity in the island is a true mix of indigenous and African lore, and Catholic doctrine.

The shots where the sky meets the ocean are breathtaking.

Credit: She’s Gotta Have It / Netflix

Blue versus blue. Need we say more?

There is music everywhere in the show and that is something that you will experience in real life.

Credit: She’s Gotta Have It / Netflix

Nora is captivated by a trumpet player on top of a historical site. Music is part of everyday life, and the Puerto Rican diaspora has generated huge stars and huge revenue (just ask the likes of J-Lo!). 

Spike Lee totally captured the politicized identity of Puerto Ricans.

Credit: She’s Gotta Have It / Netflix

Mars rides a bike and sings the Puerto Rican freedom song with gusto, and with a bit of rage. Puerto Ricans like poet Martin Espada, among many others, have long fought for autonomy, and their struggle continues. 

Did we mention the unapologetic Black, Caribbean beauty?

Credit: She’s Gotta Have It / Netflix

OMG. Does it get more empowering and beautiful than this? Nora saw herself reflected on this tall, magnificent woman.

Dance, santeros, the ocean… yes, please.

Credit: She’s Gotta Have It / Netflix

That dance by the beach with full African drumming and santeria rituals just connected us to a time before time, to the pride of a people that has historically been dispossessed. 

And that homage to Roberto Clemente gave us all the feels.

Credit: She’s Gotta Have It / Netflix

Yes, the best and bravest pelotero to come out of the island, and one of the first Latino sports figures who broke the glass ceiling of U.S. sports.

READ: Netflix Documentary ‘After Maria’ Is A Scathing, Heartbreaking Review On FEMA’s Failures For A Devastated Community

‘Pachamama’ Is The Peruvian-Inspired Movie Showing The Parallels Between Colonizers And Institutions Destroying Earth

Entertainment

‘Pachamama’ Is The Peruvian-Inspired Movie Showing The Parallels Between Colonizers And Institutions Destroying Earth

Writer-Director Juan Antin’s latest film “Pachamama”, god willing, might just save the planet. The Argentinian director’s latest project illustrates a story of a young boy from the Andes growing up during the time the Incas were colonized by Spain. Even more importantly, as a piece of content that targets younger generations, it strikes up a conversation on how the actions of early colonizers mirror the ways in which we mistreat our planet today.

“Pachamama” weaves a tale about colonialism and how it set the destruction of our planet in motion.

Netflix

“Pachamama” follows a 10-year-old boy from a remote village in the Andes Mountains who dreams of being a shaman. After an Incan overlord takes a small golden statue from their village, the boy embarks on an adventure with his friend and her pet llama to retrieve it. The film’s title, “Pachamama,” refers to an earth-mother goddess that is worshiped by the indigenous people of the Andes. What’s more, the movie has an ecological element that strongly parallels the issues related to our environment today.

“The idea came one day when I was at a festival in Cuba presenting my first film, ‘Mercano the Martian,’” explains Antin. “I was staring at the sea and I had a vision. I imagined all those ships coming in from Europe and Spain 500 years ago. I said, ‘Wow, I can imagine how the indigenous people saw these men arrive and thought they were gods.’ I started to imagine the different points of view that each one has of the other and thought it would be a good idea for a film.”

Antin says that interacting with indigenous communities was a huge part of his inspiration for the film.

Netflix

During a time in which Antin’s wife, who is an anthropologist, was doing social work for indigenous communities in Argentina, Antin was met with opportunities to speak to community leaders and shamans.

“That’s when I really fell in love with this culture of Pachamama, how they worship the earth. They are in gratitude and in love with the earth and it’s so simple,” he told Variety in a recent interview. “And I thought it’s two points of view of the same thing: Europeans coming from Spain, from Europe, from England, France also, and seeing the earth as a resource of richness and gold, and these people that just see it as something to worship.”

Check out the full clip of the film here.

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