Entertainment

Snoop Dogg Is Happy Latin Music If Finally Getting The Respect It Deserves And He’s Also Planning A Collab With Bad Bunny

Snoop Dogg is a proven fan of reggaeton music as he has previously collaborated with artists like Daddy Yankee in the past. He’s also posted regular videos of himself on Instagram listening to banda music. So it’s no surprise that in a new interview he shared the news that he’ll soon be collaborating with Bad Bunny.

Snoop Dogg is showing love to the rising Latin rap scene.

In an interview with Ultra Fiesta, a Spanish-language music channel based in Miami, Snoop discussed the rising Latino music movement. He says he’s keeping an eye on some of the biggest Latin trap artists like Ozuna and Bad Bunny.

“Latin artists deserve respect, they make great music,” he said in the interview. “So it’s overdue, it’s long overdue, and I’m happy that a lot of artists are working with them because they make great music and it’s about time for the world to know that.”

When asked if there are particular artists that he’s listening to, he dropped a big announcement about an upcoming collab with Bad Bunny.

Snoop Dogg confessed that he will soon be recording a collaboration with Latin Trap star Bad Bunny. “Yeah, me and Bad Bunny finna do one real soon.”

He literally dropped one sentence and walked away with a smile on his face. Like, we need more details. When is the collab coming out? Who initiated the collab? We need answers and we need them now.

While no other details have been revealed about the collaboration or when it will be released, fans already can’t wait for it to drop.

“No way Snoop Dogg is going to do a collaboration with Bad Bunny, that is perfect,” @Arearagon tweeted.

Snoop Dogg has had some great collaborations in the past with artists like Pharrell and Akon. I don’t think we’re prepared to see what he’ll drop with an artist like Bad Bunny. It might just be a match made in heaven.

This musical combo has the makings of a huge summer hit.

Fans are excited about this upcoming collaboration and rightfully so. It seems like Snoop has been behind some of summers biggest hits like “Drop it like it’s Hot” and “I Wanna Love You.”

Some are wondering if the collaboration will inspire more rappers to work with some of the rising Latin artists.

Credit: @Analmponderable / Twitter

It’s no surprise that Snoop Dogg has started many music trends. In 2011, Snoop broke the mold and worked with pop-star Katy Perry in the song “California Girls”. He showed it doesn’t matter how “tough” you are, it’s always possible to reach across the musical aisle to make some great songs.

Here’s hoping this is just the start of more Hip-hop artists working and producing music with some of reggaeton’s biggest stars.

READ: Bad Bunny Is The Modern Icon The Queer Latino Community Needs And Deserves Right Now. Here’s Why

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Mare Advertencia Lirika’s Rap Game Is An Ode To Social Resistance

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Mare Advertencia Lirika’s Rap Game Is An Ode To Social Resistance

In Oaxaca, Mexico the hip-hop scene is dominated by men. Influenced by early ’90s American rap artists, most lyrics are misogynistic; a commonality in past and present wrap.

As a feminist uprising fuels the country, female rappers like Mare Advertencia Lirika utilize the depth hip-hop activism can have on social justice.

Growing up listening to banda, Lirika became exposed to American hip-hop when she was 12.

Although a fan, her language barrier impacted her resonance with the genre. After hearing Mexican rap groups like Caballeros de Plan G and Vieja Guardia, her spark for rap reignited.

“The history of rap is a mix of so many things that it gives room for anyone to fit into it,” she told Refinery29.

At 16, her rap career took off.

Under a machismo culture where women are often told ‘calladita te ves más bonita,’ Lirika defies outdated standards.

In her latest feminist anthem “Que Mujer,” she encourages women to rise up against patriarchal rhetorics.

With passion and prowess, her bona fide representation of class and gender struggles echo marginalized communities disenfranchised by systems of power.

Femicide rates in Mexico are rampant, having doubled in the last five years. On average 10 women are killed every day, but due to unreliable data and systematic impunity, many cases go under-investigated.

Oaxaca is a hot spot for violence, a reality Lirika knows too well. When she was five, her father was murdered resulting in the circumstantial feminist upbringing that fueled her vocality. Raised by her mother, grandmother and aunts, witnessing women take charge in making tough decisions helped to normalize her outspokenness.

Her feminist upbringing made her the strong woman she is today.

Identifying as Zapotec, an indigenous community native to Oaxaca, Lirika’s potent lyrics pay homage to her matriarchal upbringing and social resistance.

In “¿Y Tú Qué Esperas?” Lirika’s hearty alto sound shines as she asks that women speak and live their truth.

In songs like “Se Busca” she renders a poignant message demanding the return of those who have been kidnapped. Her visuals further amplify the severity of the issue as she raps, “cada persona que no está es un ausencia que no sana.”

Unafraid of confrontation, her cutthroat verses and poeticism are visceral.

Listening to her beats feel reminiscent of old-school rap, making it almost impossible to not nod along to her intellectual wit. Fusing the melodies of cumbias and reggae among others, she spits bars that sound the alarm of revolution.

But hostility towards women in the Oaxaca rap scene still lingers.

“Most people still think that women aren’t compatible with rap and think that we are wasting our time,” she told The New York Times in 2018. “We have to continue to show up at shows because it gives us confidence to see other women rap and to show people that we can also do this.”

Perhaps one of the best known Oaxaca rappers Lirika, 34, has established herself as a prominent figure in the genre. But her call to action is just beginning.

“My life context has taught me that I can use my voice,” she told Refinery29. “And maybe that’s a privilege of mine, one I shouldn’t have, but I trust very much what I have to say. I don’t fear what I have to say.”

READ: Latinas Talk About Learning Of The Heartbreaking Colonization Of Indigenous Land And The Genocide Of Its People

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Latin Music Revenue in the U.S. Grew in 2020, Up 20 Percent in Streaming

Entertainment

Latin Music Revenue in the U.S. Grew in 2020, Up 20 Percent in Streaming

Despite the COVID-19 pandemic that grips the globe, Latin music in the U.S. saw a 20 percent rise in streaming revenue in 2020. The genre posted a fifth consecutive year of overall revenue growth last year, according to the RIAA on Wednesday.

Latin music posted its best revenue in the U.S. since 2005.

The RIAA (Recording Industry Association of America) released the 2020 year-end report on Latin music.

“Latin music continues to ‘punch above its weight’ – posting its fifth straight year of growth amidst the challenges and disruptions of the COVID economy,” wrote RIAA COO Michele Ballantyne in an annual revenue report.

After accounting for 5 percent of overall music revenue in the U.S. in 2019, that percentage rose to 5.4 percent last year. Latin music is heavily consumed on streaming and video platforms. Revenue for the genre is at its highest since 2005, the era when reggaeton music first broke through thanks to Puerto Rican acts like Daddy Yankee, Ivy Queen, and Tego Caulderón.

Bad Bunny had the highest-certified Latin music single of 2020.

Over a decade later, and it’s still reggaeton and Boricua artists that are leading the pack of Latin music stars. According to the RIAA, Bad Bunny’s “Yo Perreo Sola” was the highest-certified Latin music single of 2020. The hit song from his Grammy and Latin Grammy-winning YHLQMDLG album was certified 24-times Diamante. The RIAA is responsible for certifying albums and singles as platinum and gold. Latin music accounted for 15 percent of the certifications in 2020.

The news about Bad Bunny shouldn’t be a surprise as Spotify revealed last year that he was the most-streamed artist globally on the platform. He was followed by Canadian superstar Drake and Colombian reggaeton singer J Balvin.

The RIAA credits Latin music’s 20 percent streaming growth in 2020 to the fans who are turning to paid streaming subscriptions. YouTube is another major platform where Latin music is consumed. Billboard reported that 30 percent of the top 100 music videos of 2020 were from Latin music artists.  

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Read: Bad Bunny and Kali Uchis Win Their First Grammy Awards, Jhay Cortez Performs “Dákiti” with Benito

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