Entertainment

Salice Rose Gave Her Family A Vulnerable Look At Her Mental Health Struggles: “I Was Asking For Help”

Influencers, they’re just like us; they have their good and bad days. And they struggle with mental health issues too. Salice Rose just gave the Rose Family a very vulnerable inside look at her life, and mental health struggles over the last year. And fans are flooding her comments section with messages of support and empathy. 

We’ve all been guilty at one point or another, of imbuing influencers with seemingly mythical powers. 

They can boost brands, they offer authentic opinions and reviews and, they seem to live amazing lives with no problems at all. So when Salice Rose posted a video titled ‘How I Almost Ended My Life In 2019’ last September, we were shocked, to say the least. 

At first we see Salice alone in a room, saying how she’s re-recorded the video many times in an attempt to get it right. 

“I think I’ve started this video over and over like 6 times already, because I don’t want to say the wrong thing,” she says with a serious face. “But I’m just gonna be me.”

“It’s very hard for me to make this video because you guys know I’m a very strong person.”

“I stand for strength,” Salice affirms. “It sucks that this past year, 2019…I got so mentally unstable and weak, that I tried to end my own life.” The youtuber and influencer didn’t go into details about what triggered her, or what happened to her during that year that got her to this stage, but she wanted to tell her story to help other people who might be going through the same. 

Depression is on the rise among American teens and young adults, with adolescent girls showing the greatest vulnerability, a national survey reveals.

Back in 2005, the risk of major depressive disorder for teenage boys was pegged at 4.5 percent, and 13 percent for teenage girls. By 2014, however, boys’ risk of depression rose to 6 percent, but for girls it soared to more than 17 percent, the survey found. “These are episodes during which the adolescent experiences five or more depressive symptoms for a period of two weeks or longer,” explained study author Dr. Ramin Mojtabai. He is a professor in the department of mental health at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore.

More American teens and young adults appear to be struggling with mental health issues, and experts believe a number of cultural trends may help explain why.

A closer look shows that teen depression risk only started to edge upwards starting in 2012, with risk weighing more heavily on teen girls throughout the survey period. Mojtabai said the findings “are consistent with recent data on trends in suicide in the U.S.” A new study found the percentage of teens and young adults with depression, anxiety and other mental health issues has increased sharply over the past decade. The same pattern was not seen in older adults.

In the video, Salice wanted to retell the happenings of the night when she got close to taking her life. 

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“I was going through this wave of sadness, depression, anger…I forgot how to be strong.” She goes on to explain how one night, she took her keys and went out for a drive. At 9pm at night, she started driving to church —even if it was closed, she wanted to sit outside to regain herself. “The emotions I was feeling as I was driving to church…it wasn’t ok,” she says, “I felt like I had lost my mind, and I felt like what I was going through was never going to go away or stop.”

“If this is never gonna go away, maybe I should.”

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Salice’s never-ending negative thoughts filled her with a sense of impending doom and hopelessness. Experts warn that everyone should educate themselves on the warning signs of depression and get their loved ones the help they need before it gets to a point of no return. 

Symptoms of major depression vary from person to person but can include:

  • Feelings of sadness, emptiness or hopelessness
  • Tiredness and lack of energy
  • Outbursts of anger, irritability or frustration, even over small matters
  • Anxiety, agitation or restlessness
  • Loss of interest or pleasure in most or all normal activities
  • Sleep disturbances, such as insomnia or sleeping too much
  • Reduced appetite and weight loss or increased cravings for food and weight gain
  • Feelings of worthlessness or guilt
  • Difficulty thinking and concentrating

And, as it turns out, Salice isn’t alone. She’s not the only one having these thoughts. 

The rate of young adults with suicidal thoughts, plans, attempts, and deaths by suicide has increased from 7.0 percent in 2009 to 10.3 percent in 2017. Interestingly, no significant increase was seen in adults. There was even a slight decline in psychological distress in people over the age of 65. For the study, researchers analyzed data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, a nationally representative survey that tracks drug and alcohol use, mental health and other health-related issues in individuals age 12 and over. The research was published in the Journal of Abnormal Psychology.

What’s causing this increase?

While the researchers didn’t study the reasons behind the trend, they have some theories. Study author Jean Twenge told CBS News, that shifting cultural trends over the past decade, including increased use of electronic communications and digital media, may have had a larger effect on mood disorders among younger generations compared with older generations.

“Recently, there’s been a number of studies showing that those who spend more time on digital media are more likely to be depressed and unhappy,” Twenge said.

“I was asking for help and at that moment, no one was responding.”

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❤️Stay Strong. #salicerose

A post shared by Salice Rose (@salicerose) on

Later on in the video, Salice explains how she made it to church, she got out of her car and started messaging people on her phone. But it was late at night and no one was responding. So she googled a helpline. “So I thought, ‘What do I do?’ I don’t want to be a burden asking for help.” She googled searched for a helpline and got someone on the phone who talked to her for 7 minutes. She told him what was happening in her life and how she got to that point. She told him that she needed help.

The next day, Salice’s whole family was there for her.

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Baby Salice to Salice now LOL! ????????❤️

A post shared by Salice Rose (@salicerose) on

The Youtuber’s whole family got together to be with her. Proving that as lonely as you feel, you’re never alone. She went on to share a message on the description of the video, “I just hope I can save a few lives by posting this. I just want you guys to know that overall you are never alone even though you may feel alone sometimes and I want to spread awareness all over the world that it’s OK to ask for help. You are not a burden…. you are so needed on this earth and I love every single one of you individually more than you can ever imagine.”

If you believe a loved is at risk of suicide, do not leave him or her alone. Try to get the person to seek help from a doctor or the nearest hospital emergency department or dial 911. It’s important to remove access to firearms, medications, or any other potential tools they might use to harm themselves. For immediate help if you are in a crisis, call the toll-free National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255), which is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. All calls are confidential.

Bad Bunny’s ‘Yo Perreo Sola’ Music Video Has Drag, Female Empowerment, And Artistic Styling That Is World-Class

Entertainment

Bad Bunny’s ‘Yo Perreo Sola’ Music Video Has Drag, Female Empowerment, And Artistic Styling That Is World-Class

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Bad Bunny is known to push gender norms and supports the LGBTQ+ community. His music videos are artistic expressions of the world he wants to live in. His latest music video for the song “Yo Perreo Sola” is catching everyone’s attention for several reasons including the trapero singing and dancing in full drag.

Bad Bunny starts his “Yo Perreo Sola” music video in a hot red leather drag outfit.

Like, dayum. The Puerto Rican trap star did not hold back. His look was everything as he gave us some “Oops…I Did It Again” dominatrix vibes. The fans were not prepared for this but it seems that most of them are all for Bad Bunny pushing boundaries even further in Latin trap.

The imagery is literally being celebrated for its strong statement for the LGBTQ+ community.

Bad Bunny was very outspoken about Alexa Negrón Luciano, a trans woman who was murdered in Puerto Rico and misgendered in media reports. The singer was on “The Late Show starring Jimmy Fallon” and used the moment to protest the treatment of Luciano’s legacy. Bad Bunny wore a shirt that read in Spanish, “They killed Alexa, not a man in a skirt.”

Bad Bunny fans were ready to defend their fave and his new music video.

To many, Latin trap is still a place where homophobia and misogyny fester in lyrics by some of the top performers. Bad Bunny is one artist that has been fighting against that culture from within. He has bent gender norms in music videos and it has set his career apart from other Latin trap musicians.

And they are all celebrating the anguish of straight men who listen to Bad Bunny and have social hang-ups.

The same homophobia in Latin trap is reflected within the community. Bad Bunny’s unapologetic willingness to take gender and flip it on its head is just one thing fans love about the trapero.

You can watch the full video below.

Bad Bunny never disappoints, does he?

READ: Bad Bunny Is The Modern Icon The Queer Latino Community Needs And Deserves Right Now. Here’s Why

Latinos In New York City Face More Layoffs Than Non-Latino Peers

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Latinos In New York City Face More Layoffs Than Non-Latino Peers

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The country is witnessing a high amount of mass layoffs across several industries in the face of the COVID-19 outbreak. Last week, 3.3 million Americans filed for unemployment, the highest number in history. Economists anticipate a 20 percent unemployment rate in the United States and some cities are already feeling the impact of these layoffs. In New York City, Latinos are facing more layoffs than their peers.

Latinos in New York City are facing higher levels of unemployment caused by COVID-19.

MSNBC Legal Analyst Maya Wiley tweeted about the foreseeable disproportionate impact these layoffs would have on minority communities. The tweet is ringing true as 41 percent of Latinos in NYC have been laid off from their jobs in response to the COVID-19 outbreak.

The Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy of the City University of New York conducted a survey with 1,000 participants. The survey found that roughly 4 out of every 10 Latinos in NYC have lost their job or someone in their household lost their job due to the health crisis. The survey found that 24 percent of white and Asian employees and 15 percent of Black employees reported losing jobs.

“It’s likely because the Hispanic community, many are in service jobs like restaurants or hotels,” Professor Scott Ratzan, a senior scholar at CUNY SPH, who led the survey, said in a statement. “We do the survey in English and Spanish, and [job loss is] higher among the Spanish-speaking community.” 

New York is the hardest-hit state in the U.S. with more than 30,000 confirmed cases of the virus.

New York state is facing the most extreme outbreak of the novel coronavirus when compared to the rest of the country. Governor Andrew Cuomo delivers an address to the media every morning and has told New Yorkers to brace for a serious viral outbreak. More than 30,000 New Yorkers have tested positive for COVID-19 and 325 deaths. Around 20,000 of those cases and about 280 of those deaths are in NYC.

Gov. Cuomo shared data that showed how the measures New York has taken to slow the spread is contributing to a slowing hospitalization rate. According to The New York Times, the hospitalization rate in New York state is slowing. On Sunday, the governor shared stat showing the rate doubling every two days. By Thursday, new data shows the hospitalization rate doubling every 4.7 days.

There are resources available for New Yorkers who are losing their jobs during the outbreak.

Some New Yorkers are reporting some delays in getting a hold of people in the unemployment offices. While the waits are long, it is worth being persistent.

According to NYC Emergency Management, there are several options for people who are being laid off during the COVID-19 pandemic. Unemployment assistance is available to everyone in New York state and the state has waived the 7-day wait period to alleviate the added pressures of COVID-19. Employees should know about the Shared Work program offered as an alternative to worker layoffs that provides some income assistance while workers have to work a reduced schedule.

The Office of Nightlife is also asking nightlife employees to fill out a survey about lost income in an attempt to help contractors, performers, workers, and business owners impacted by the closures.

READ: Latinas Are Sharing How They Protect Their Loved Ones From Coronavirus