Entertainment

“Roma” Wins Three Oscars At The 2019 Academy Awards

Last night’s Oscars was all about Alfonso Cuarón and his film “Roma.” The 91st Academy Awards recognized “Roma” with ten nominations, the most of all films, and yet the main category that mattered was Best Actress.

Yalitza Aparicio’s historic nomination — the first Mexican indigenous actress to ever be nominated for an Oscar — had everyone watching in anticipation, including those in her hometown of Ttlaxiaco, Oaxaca in Mexico.

While Roma didn’t take home every Oscar it was nominated for, the cast and crew did not go home empty handed.

Alfonso Cuarón won for Best Director.

@CinemaBlend / Twitter

Fellow Mexican director Guillermo Del Toro presented Cuarón with the award saying that he was feeling sick but he was not going to miss the big night. It’s a good thing he showed up. He was elated to hand the big award to his friend.

“Being up here doesn’t get old,” Cuarón said.

Unfortunately, Aparicio lost for Best Actress, but there’s no denying she looked beautiful.

@andreagonram / Twitter

She wore a stunning Rodarte gown. Clearly she and her mother were over the moon when they had a chance to meet Diego Luna while walking the red carpet.

Obviously, she would take her mom as her date.

@ANIMEKEATING / Twitter

“I realize that being a teacher and being an actress can be quite similar. We can teach the world through the presentation of this film,” she told “Entertainment Tonight” while on the red carpet.

Marina de Tavira also helped Aparicio with translating her interviews during the red carpet.

mardetavira / Instagram

From the very beginning of this movie’s release, de Tavira and Aparicio have been promoting it side-by-side, which is why seeing them together on the red carpet was even more special. Not only were they accompanying each other, but de Tavira was kind enough to be her translator.

The entire cast of “Roma” attended the award show.

@HuffPostMexico / Twitter

We are so glad they could all partake in the festivities, especially actor Jorge Antonio Guerrero who had issues getting his visa approved to come to the U.S.

De Tavira lost for Best Supporting Actress to Regina King.

Kevork Djansezian / Getty Images

People we upset that the leading ladies of “Roma” were denied their win, but Cuarón thanked them each time he went on stage.

Alfonso Cuarón won the Oscar for Best Cinematography.

@DishNation / Twitter

“Thank you very much, Mexico. My family,” Cuarón said.

“Roma” also took Best Foreign Film.

“You know, I grew up watching foreign language films. Films like ‘Jaws’ and ‘Citizen Kane'” Cuarón said to the crowd and then went on to thank Aparicio and de Tavira.

We’re so happy for “Roma” and everyone involved with the film!

READ: Latinos Have A Long History Of Being Nominated At The Academy Awards With Some Major Wins

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The Stars of “Real Housewives of Dallas” Have Split The Internet Into Two Camps Following a Drama-Filled Episode That Ended in a Xenophobic Rant

Entertainment

The Stars of “Real Housewives of Dallas” Have Split The Internet Into Two Camps Following a Drama-Filled Episode That Ended in a Xenophobic Rant

Dallas

We’d be lying to ourselves if we didn’t admit that we love to indulge in some good, old-fashioned reality TV drama just as much as the next person. Luckily for us, Wednesday’s episode of Real Housewives of Dallas offered us just that. And this time, the drama centered around RHOD’s primadonna LeeAnne Locken and RHOD’s first cast member of Mexican descent, Kary Brittingham. 

For those of you who don’t know, Brittingham is a wealthy Dallas socialite who moved to Dallas from Guadalajara at the age of 16. She is married to Eduardo Brittingham, a Mexican-American millionaire, and entrepreneur who founded a company called Tu Familia, a “social media engagement app platform which connects and empowers Latino communities globally”. 

Episode 12 of Season Four saw the ladies taking an impromptu trip to Thailand. The trip was meant to be a relaxing learning experience for everyone, but of course, nothing can ever be relaxing in the Real Housewives world. Locken and Brittingham immediately began to butt heads over arbitrary tourism “rules” of Thailand–specifically, the expectation that visitors take off their hats when entering a Buddhist temple. 

The drama reached another level, however when Brittingham and fellow cast member D’Andra Simmons went out of their way to publicly mock Locken’s business venture, her L’Infinity dress.

For those of you who aren’t aware, last season, Locken debuted a dress she designed that she was incredibly proud of, the L’Infinity dress, which, according to her, could be worn in 175 different ways. Sensing a potentially hilarious opportunity, Simmons brought the dress with her to Thailand in order to wear to dinner. When Brittingham and Simmons arrived at dinner, they claimed that their tardiness was due to how much they struggled with putting the dress on. 

“We had a little wardrobe malfunction. This is all coming apart,” Simmons said while sitting down. While at first, her ensemble was met with exclamations of “How cute!” and “That dress looks gorgeous on you!” from the rest of the cast members, the mood quickly changed as the women began to realize that Simmons wasn’t wearing it from a place of support. Brittingham piled on with the criticism, adding selling the dress with “an instruction booklet…with pictures” would be “super helpful”.

While Locken first tried to brush off the teasing, she soon snapped, leaving the dinner table in tears. 

While being privately interviewed, later on, Locken explained the origins of her frustration: “If it’s a ‘joke’, you come down, you make it, you move on,” she said. “If you keep going because you haven’t gotten a reaction from me, it’s because you did it to get a reaction from me”. Indeed, it wasn’t only Locken who were a bit turned off by the ladies’ incessant teasing. “There’s a difference between a joke and a joke at someone’s expense”, Stephanie Hollman said later. “What they’re doing is, it’s a joke and LeeAnne’s a punchline, and that’s not cool.”

To make matters worse, the entire fiasco culminated in LeeAnne totally losing it and verbally attacking Brittingham due to her Mexican heritage. As part of the episode’s conclusion, as well as the preview for the next episode, we see Locken venting her frustration to Hollman, saying that Brittingham doesn’t “have the balls to be courageous” and admit that wearing the dress was coming from a place of malice. Talking about it, Locken becomes visibly more and more enraged, hitting herself in the face and saying, “C’mon Mexican, I thought you were all Mexican and strong. F*** that b****. You ain’t survive s***. And I’m tired of it”.

After Wednesday’s episode fans of RHOD were firmly divided into two camps: those of Locken’s side and those on Brittingham and Simmons’ side.

Others believed that Locken couldn’t justify why came off as a pretty racist rant at the end of the episode.

Some people couldn’t get past what they saw as Locken’s pretty racist rant at the end of the episode.

Others truly believed Brittingham and Simmons went too far and crossed the line into “bullying” territory. 

It’s interesting how starkly different people feel about the same situation.

This person called out Locken for her, frankly, xenophobic behavior:

Making fun of Brittingham’s perfectly understandable English is icky.

And this person seemed personally aggrieved at Brittingham and Simmons’ “prank”.

As for us, we believe all of the women involved could benefit from an intense session or two of therapy. 

As Disney+ Launches, Here Are Some Of The Offensive Movies And Scenes You Might Or Might Not See On The Platform

Entertainment

As Disney+ Launches, Here Are Some Of The Offensive Movies And Scenes You Might Or Might Not See On The Platform

Disney

On November 12th, Disney launched its much-anticipated streaming service Disney+, a platform that offers over 7,000 television episodes and 500 films of Disney titles to its subscribers. And while the influx of beloved Disney content is exciting, some Disney fans can’t help but cringe at the outdated, stereotypical tropes that some of the House of Mouse’s older content employed. And while racist tropes and offensive stereotypes were par for the course decades ago, we are now living in a world where sensitive cultural representation in the media is of the utmost importance. 

Aware of people’s lowered tolerance for racism in their entertainment, Disney+ has issued content warnings on some of their titles. The warning reads: “This program is presented as originally created. It may contain outdated cultural depictions”. And while some are applauding Disney for acknowledging the problematic nature of some of their content, others don’t think that a mere content warning is enough. Others are calling for Disney to make a greater effort to reckon with their problematic legacy. In light of these development, here are seven of the most racist moments in Disney movies that you can look out for when deciding on your next Disney+ viewing.

1. The Siamese Cats in “Lady and the Tramp”

@lcrowde8/Twitter

When “Lady and the Tramp” was released in 1955, it wasn’t unusual for the entertainment industry to create characters based on offensive stereotypes of what they believed people of Asian descent acted like. One of the most offensive instances of this were there characters “Si” and “Am” in “Lady and the Tramp”–two mischievous and troublesome cats who come into Lady’s home and make a mess, which Lady is ultimately blamed for. It doesn’t help that the cats are illustrated with slanted eyes and sing with broken accents. 

2. Everything about “Song of the South”

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Probably the most offensive and problematic of all Disney movies, “Song of the South” was released in 1946. It follows the story of a young boy who befriends Uncle Remus, a former slave who teaches him about life through a series of fables. The movie is upsetting for many reasons, one of which is the way the movie expresses nostalgia for the pre-Civil War way of life–which even the movie’s black characters seem to long for. The song “Song of the South” is the perfect example of this, where a black choir sings, “This heart of mine is in the heart of Dixie. That’s where I belong”. 

3. The Crows in “Dumbo”

@lcrowde8/Twitter

The crows in “Dumbo” are a play on blackface minstrel characters that much of the American audience would’ve been familiar with at the time of “Dumbo”‘s release in 1941. To add insult to injury, the character of Jim Crow (yes, that’s actually his name), was voiced by white actor Cliff Edwards, voicing an exaggerated version of a stereotypical black Southern voice. In “Dumbo”, Jim is depicted as lazy, dumb, and indulgent. This offensive stereotype of black people was well-known in the South. 

4. Sunflower in “Fantasia”

@WookieJohn/Twitter

In the original “Fantasia” released in 1940, the movie features a little black character named Sunflower. Sunflower was a black little girl with the body of a donkey. She was drawn with dark skin, an over-exaggerated nose and lips and braids in her hair. From her brief appearance in the movie, her apparent purpose in life was to help the glamorous white centaurs with their beauty routine (she was shown as filing the nails of a centaur). In later version, her character was cropped out completely of the movie to avoid a public outcry. 

5. “What Makes a Red Man Red?” in “Peter Pan”

@WookieJohn/Twitter

The racism inherent in “Peter Pan” is laid out plainly in the song “What Makes a Red Man Red?” that Neverland’s tribe of Native Americans sings to explain their history to the Lost Boys. The song is meant to be the origin story of how Native Americans got their skin color. The lyrics are as follows: “Let’s go back a million years/To the very first Injun prince/He kissed a maid and start to blush/And we’ve all been blushin’ since”. 

6. “Arabian Nights” in “Aladdin”

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Critics of “Aladdin” have long called the movie problematic for the way it depicts people of Middle Eastern descent and how it fails to illustrate the differences between various Middle Eastern cultures. Instead, the Kingdom of Agraba is a mish-mash of various cultures of the Middle East which implies that the cultures are interchangeable. And don’t forget the most problematic pat of the movie, the song “Arabian Nights” that contains the following lyrics: “I come from a land…Where they cut off your ear if they don’t like your face. It’s barbaric, but hey, it’s home”.

7. Shun Gon in “The Aristocats”

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The Chinese cat Shun Gon in “The Aristocats” is another prime example of a racist character that Disney employed in their earlier movies. Shun Gon is a member of O’Malley the Alley Cat’s street gang. He speaks in broken English, has slanted eyes and prominent teeth, and plays the piano with chopsticks. In other words, it doesn’t get more offensive that this.