Entertainment

Puerto Rican Slang and Culture Through Bad Bunny Lyrics in Photos

Puerto Rican reggaetonero and trap artist El Conejo Malo has gone from bagging groceries in his home town of Vega Baja, Puerto Rico to a full-fledged award-winning artist in the span of just a couple years. While the 25-year-old has become an international success, he’s committed to his roots and it shows.

His album X100pre Nochebuena is the gift that keeps on giving to the world. For any Boricua that has his album on loop, you might keep picking up on new gems along the way.

Or, if you’re like me and grew up in the U.S., I guarantee you will be delighted to learn what El Conejo Malo was referencing.

Here’s just some of what you might have missed from Benito Antonio Martínez Ocasio’s debut album.

Bad Bunny / YouTube

From santería to Puerto Rican world boxing champion Iván Calderón Marrero, his tracks might remind you of that one decade all your tías dressed in white or your machísmo tío’s poster shrine to Calderón.

We all know Bad Bunny se encanta los perreos.

Bad Bunny / YouTube

It’s the most reggaeton and Boricua slang of the whole album, sneaking its way into almost every canción. Perreo is what you might have called “grinding” in middle school.

In “Como Antes,” the Tazos are little collectible discs found in Frito-Lay chip bags.

Bad Bunny / YouTube

“Me puse a jugar Tazo” he sings, in reference to the toys. He also references the exact time Los Simpsons aired (a las cuatro).

Bad Bunny pays tribute to Daddy Yankee all album long.

Bad Bunny / YouTube

In “Cuando Perriabas,” Bad Bunny sings, “Y bum, pa’ atrá’, bum-bum, pa’ alante/Este party es sólo para la gente que aguante.” Remember Daddy Yankee’s 2004 “Donde Hubo Fuego” when he sings the same verses? This whole song is basically a tribute to all the parties that gave birth to the perreos.

In “200 MPH,” BB gives another nod to Daddy Yankee’s appearance in Talento de Barrio.

Bad Bunny / YouTube

Remember that 2008 film about Daddy Yankee’s escape from a life of drug dealing through reggaeton? The characters in the film were Dinero and Wichy, which is who Bad Bunny is referring to in the letra “Dinero, dinero, me falta Wichy.”

Unless you a Bori, you wouldn’t know “bichote” is slang for drug dealer.

Bad Bunny / YouTube

Another nod at Talento de Barrio, BB sings about his young-hearted dream to become a bichote, a king in the streets. He also calls out the Puerto Rican government for closing down schools, which give way to “puntas” (a.k.a. trap houses).

BB expands from reggaeton to honor Nuyorican pianists and salsa artists también.

Bad Bunny / YouTube

Me siento Ray, pero Richie” refers to Puerto Rican pianist and composer Richie Ray who is known as “El Embajador del Piano.” “Rumba buena, timbalero” is about salsa band La Sonora Ponceña’s song “Timbalero,” a song many of us grew up dancing to while we cleaned the house.

In “Ni Bien Ni Mal,” BB pays tribute to Boricua trapero Miky Woodz.

Bad Bunny / YouTube

He sings, “como dice Miky, no te voy a mentir.” That means BB has spooken: if you haven’t heard Miky’s 2017 song “No Te Wa a Mentir,” get to it.

We even hear allusions to santería, a religion only practiced in Afro-Latino Caribbean islands.

Bad Bunny / YouTube

Ando de blanco entero, flow santero” paints the picture of Boricuas, Cubanos y Dominicanos walking the streets in all white, in honor of the Yoruba-Catholic religion. Only Boris and our gente de islas know about the altars with bowls of holy water, statues of saints and candles hidden in their abuelita’s closets.

My all time favorite Bori slang is in “Caro.”

Bad Bunny / YouTube

Your Spanish teacher will tell you that “caro” means expensive, but in Puerto Rico, it can mean a beautiful girl who knows her worth and will never sleep with you or more simply, self-worth. In “Caro,” BB flexes this imagery to combat the haters of his gender fluidity.

During the angelic interlude, Ricky Martin’s vocals add even more depth to the song.

Bad Bunny / YouTube

¿Por qué no puedo ser así?
¿En qué te hago daño a ti?
¿En qué te hago daño a ti?
Yo solamente soy feliz

Every Bori remembers the decade of the chismosando dentro nuestros tías, all speculating on Ricky Martin’s sexuality. He was beautiful and everyone wanted to sleep with him, but he refused to comment on his identity until much later. This ballad touches on an inter-generational pandora’s box of emotions around Latino culture’s rigid expectation of sexuality and gender expression. BB knows his worth, and that “con dinero y sin dinero, mi flow es caro.”

“Otra Noche en Miami” is all about achieving the dreams BB had from his vantage point in PR.

Bad Bunny / YouTube

Pa’l Khalifa Kush tengo la conexión. Pa’l avenue Miami Beach, e’ mi dirección” Everything is going his way, but the shine of his Rolex doesn’t shine brighter than a loved one’s smile. This is the list of the dreams he had in Puerto Rico realized before he comes to the realization that they meant nothing.

“Estamos Bien” was released as a tribute to Puerto Rican resilience post-Maria, sí.

Bad Bunny / YouTube

It’s about PR’s notorious potholes, courtesy of a lackadaisical government, and the determination and hard work of Boricuas regardless: “La Mercedes en P.R. cogiendo boquete, eh.” It’s also about BB’s own return to self. He gets the dream and becomes bored with the threesomes. It is also about the return to his island with his sanity restored.

“Solo de Mi” has quickly become the poster song for well-known cultural issues domestic violence in Latino homes.

Bad Bunny / YouTube

Venezuelan actress Laura Chimaras seems to be invisibly beaten while singing about her self ownership. Eventually, the bruises clear and we head straight into a perreo where we hear references to Hector y Tito’s “Noches de Travesura” when BB sings “Hoy e’ noche ‘e travesura/hoy e’ pata’ abajo.”

“Baby me siento down” in “Si Estuviésemos Juntos” is love for his teenage emo heart for RKM & Ken-Y’s 2006 hit “Down.”

Bad Bunny / YouTube

The album goes from high beat perreos to raw emotionality instantaneously. We get to have “Quien Tú Eres?” and then listen to “Caro” right after. In BB’s breakup song of the album, he isn’t defaulting to the trend of move on already pop hits. He wishes he did things differently and acknowledges his part.

“La Romana” is an ode to the DR, no question.

Bad Bunny / YouTube

His collabs with Dominicano El Alfa prove that, but we still get a little spice of PR with “Ojalái, ojalái que esta noche tú sea’ mi mai, eh, hey“–an interlude in Voltio and Residente’s “Chulin Chulin Chunfly.”

“RLNDT” is about a lot of heavy mental health issues, but Boricuas hear an underlying societal message.

Bad Bunny / YouTube

In 1999, a 5-year-old Puerto Rican boy, Rolando (Rolandito “RLNDT”) Salas Jusino went missing. He was never found, no matter how much attention the entire island gave the story. In BB’s music video, we just see a still of a 5-year-old baby Bad Bunny.

Your favorite aggro workout song “Quien Tu Eres?” embodies the energy of Iván Calderón Marrero.

Bad Bunny / YouTube

BB is a self-professed fanatic of boxing. His music video for this song is just him punching this bag with a Puerto Rican flag behind him. Calderón was the Puerto Rican two-weight world boxing champ and untouchable hero for Puerto Rico.

Finally, “MÍA” both launches BB into the guy that got Canadian superstar Drake to sing in Spanish and still lift up Boricuas.

Bad Bunny / YouTube

Yo soy tu Romeo, pero no Santo” makes perfect sense on it’s own–he might be a romantic but he wants to have his way with you. It also gives a subtle shout out to bachatero Romeo Santos. Nice one, BB.

All we can say is, gracias, BB, for this time capsule tribute to the ’90s and early 2000s and a 2018 classic.

Bad Bunny / YouTube

We’re still playing X100 PRE on repeat and earning our keep en La Neuva Religión. Mil gracias.

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Bad Bunny Tests Positive for COVID-19; Forced to Cancel His AMA Performance Last Minute

Entertainment

Bad Bunny Tests Positive for COVID-19; Forced to Cancel His AMA Performance Last Minute

Photo by Amy Sussman/BBMA2020/Getty Images

On Sunday night, viewers of the American Music Awards were left disappointed when they waited hours for a Bad Bunny performance…that never came.

On Monday, Bad Bunny’s PR team released a statement addressing the situation. “Bad Bunny was originally set to perform his #1 global hit “Dákiti” with Jhay Cortez live for the first time at the AMAs,” said Acoustyle Communication. “But unfortunately, the artist tested positive for COVID-19, which forced him to cancel the presentation.” There is no word as to the state of the reggaeton star’s condition.

Prior to the AMAs, the show had announced that Bad Bunny would be performing “Dákiti” during the program. Instead, viewers were treated to a an at-home recording of Bad Bunny announcing Becky G as Best Female Latin Artist, and that’s it.

Suspicious of the last-minute change in plans, fans quickly began speculating that Bad Bunny had caught the coronavirus and was forced to cancel his performance. After all, the seemed like the only logical explanation. Bad Bunny has never been one to cancel performances before. So the announcement of his positive COVID-19 test came as a disappointing (if not surprising) confirmation.

Although COVID-19 has crippled many aspects of the entertainment industry, Bad Bunny has nonetheless had a very eventful year. Not only did he release his album “YHLQMDLG” in February, but he has been promoting it the entire year, despite the pandemic. The album has been met with near universal critical acclaim. Eighteen of his songs charted in Billboard’s US Hot Latin Songs Top 20.

Bad Bunny also announced lucrative brand partnerships with Crocs and Adidas. Not only that, but he filmed his acting debut for the upcoming season of Narcos. So it’s safe to say that this positive test has added to the craziness of Bad Bunny’s already very hectic year.

Naturally, fans flocked to Twitter to express the range of the emotions they felt at the news that their prince was sick.

As if 2020 couldn’t get any worse.

Of course, Bad Bunny fans were quick to generate memes about the entire situation.

It seems like a lot of fans are trying to cope with the news through humor.

If this development doesn’t seem like a storyline snatched right out of a telenovela, we don’t know what is.

This fan decided that Bad Bunny’s illness means they will now be dedicating their life to science.

Even though Bad Bunny seems like one of those larger-than-life personalities that is indestructible, the fact of his positive test proves that everyone is at risk of contracting this virus. Even mega-stars.

This person expressed their unmitigated grief at the news.

We feel this so hard.

But in all seriousness, we truly hope Bad Bunny quickly recovers and remains happy, healthy, and safe. Despite the internet memes out there, COVID-19 is no joke. We all have to take precautions like wearing a mask, washing our hands frequently, and practicing social distancing–especially during the upcoming holiday season.

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Bad Bunny Is Set to Make His Acting Debut In the Upcoming Season of ‘Narcos: Mexico’

Entertainment

Bad Bunny Is Set to Make His Acting Debut In the Upcoming Season of ‘Narcos: Mexico’

Photo: David Becker/Getty Images for LARAS

There’s a new Hollywood actor in town and his name is Bad Bunny. That’s right, Netflix just announced that the Puerto Rican reggaeton artist is going to have a supporting role in the third season of “Narcos: Mexico”. Yes, we may still be sad over Diego Luna leaving the beloved Netflix franchise, but having Bad Bunny on screen is more than a good enough consolation prize.

Bad Bunny initially teased his involvement with the show when he graced the cover of “Rolling Stone” in May, saying that he would be a “supporting actor” in the upcoming season. Entertainment outlets have now reported that Bad Bunny will play Arturo “Kitty” Paez, a member of the “Narco Junior” gang run by Ramon Arellano Felix (Manuel Masalva). The role is supposed to be a relatively small one.

According to Netflix, the Narco Junior gang is made up of “rich, well connected kids from upper society who fell in with the cartel life for the money, drugs, and violence.” We can totally see Bad Bunny doing this.

The newest season is supposed to set in Mexico of the 1990s when the illegal drug trade started to really globalize. The series will follow “a new generation of Mexican kingpins” who fight for power after Felix Gallardo’s empire “splinters”. Sounds like juicy stuff!

Bad Bunny started shooting his scenes in Mexico right after he joined Shakira and Jennifer Lopez during the Superbowl halftime show in February. But shortly after he arrived in Mexico, production promptly shut down due to the coronavirus pandemic. For his part, Bad Bunny didn’t seem so sad about the delay, saying that he “needed the rest” after such an intense year. But thankfully for us, it appears the production finally wrapped and the show is headed for our smalls screens! We can’t wait to see if he’s as talented at acting as he is at music.

Naturally, Bad Bunny fans couldn’t help but stan over the news.

Some people were already huge fans of “Narcos: Mexico” and this casting announcement just cemented their love for the show.

As Netflix probably wanted, the announcement grabbed the attention of people who had never even seen the show before.

Tweets like this prove that this was a smart casting decision.

But other fans were suspicious, having been burnt before by so-called celebrity “cameos”.

This sort of reminds us when they hyped Cardi B’s role in “Hustlers” for weeks and then she only appeared for a few minutes.

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