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13 Dead After Private Plane Crash From Las Vegas To Monterrey After Watching Canelo Alvarez Fight

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Families are mourning the tragic death of 13 people after a private plane crashed while flying between Las Vegas and Monterrey. Passengers of the plane were in Las Vegas to see a boxing match between Mexican fighter Saúl “Canelo” Alvarez and U.S. fighter Daniel Jacobs. Here’s what we know so far about the people on the plane when it crashed.

Ten passengers and three crew members are dead after a plane crash in northern Mexico.

Credit: @BenjAlvarez1 / Twitter

The private charter flight was a Bombardier Challenger 601. According to several reports, the group was on the way back to Mexico after watching Saúl “Canelo” Alvarez in a boxing match in Las Vegas.

Alvarez tweeted about the tragic plane crash offering condolences to the families of those who died.

Credit: @Canelo / Twitter

“I deeply regret the terrible plane accident that left Vegas,” Canelo tweeted. “I really appreciate the support of everyone that travels to my fights. My prayers with the families.”

The plane crashed in a mountainous area over in the municipality of Ocampo in Coahuila.

Credit: Protección Civil de Ocampo, Coahuila. / Facebook

The wreckage was discovered during an air search of the area where the plane lost contact. There were two families and three crew members onboard when the plane crashed killing everyone on the plane.

A manifest of the passengers was released and named all of those who died on the flight.

Credit: @Lululoal / Twitter

These are the names and ages of those who died on the flight:

Crew: Pilot Juan Jose Aguilar Talavera, 45, Co-pilot Luis Ovidio Gonzalez Flores, 29, Adriana Monserrat Mejia Sanchez, 29

Passengers: Luis Octavio Reyes Dominguez, 54, Loyda Liliana Luna Larrosa, 49, Jade Paola Reyes Luna, 26, Guillermo Octavio Reyes Luna, 23, Frida Alejandrina Reyes Luna, 19, Ramon Amauri Vela, 57, Martha Isabel Garcia Lagoons, 43, Gary Amauri Vela Garcia, 19, Manuel Alejandro Sepulveda Gonzalez, 25, Monica Leticia Salinas Trevino, 22

Authorities are still investigating the crash. mitú will provide updates as they are revealed.

READ: This Latino Director Was Deeply Affected by a Family Tragedy, So He Turned it into a Triumph

Mexico Is Putting Luxury Cars, Condos, And Land Seized From Real Life Narcos Up For Auction, Here’s What You Could Buy

Things That Matter

Mexico Is Putting Luxury Cars, Condos, And Land Seized From Real Life Narcos Up For Auction, Here’s What You Could Buy

lopezobrador / Instagram

Giant estates with swimming pools and escape tunnels, a ranch surrounded by acres of land, and a chic luxury apartment with a terrifying history were among the 27 properties Mexico had seized from drug traffickers and others auctioned on Sunday.

The government is seizing property and selling it at auction.

Credit: @outsidetheknow / Twitter

The apartments auctioned on Sunday include one of a cartel leader who was killed there and disposed of by his brothers.

The government is also selling off land. The cheapest is a lot in Culiacán, Sinaloa, priced at about $11,200 USD, while the most expensive is the Rancho Los Tres García in Naucalpan, México state, priced at over $1.6 million USD. It was confiscated from convicted drug trafficker Carlos Montemayor, father-in-law of Edgar “La Barbie” Valdez Villarreal, after he was arrested in 2010.

According to Mexican media, the auction raised $56.6 million pesos (or about $3 million USD) of the 167m pesos predicted.

The Mexican President pledged that all the money raised from the auctions would go to benefit impoverished communities.

Credit: @BBCNewsbeat / Twitter

According to Lopez-Obrador (AMLO), the proceeds from the auction of properties and land, which had been seized by previous governments, would go to aid marginalized communities in the poor and violent state of Guerrero.

“Buyers will know that in addition to acquiring a good deal, they will also be doing good, that is, they will be helping those who need support because of the situation of poverty and marginalization they suffer,” AMLO said Friday.

In one of his first acts in office, Lopez Obrador enforced an austerity plan.

Credit: @thesunpostnews / Twitter

AMLO sold government-owned vehicles and even planned on selling the president’s brand new Boeing 787 jetliner. He also dismissed the Presidential Guard, which is tasked with protecting the president, and declined to move into Los Pinos – Mexico’s version of the White House – and instead lives in his private home.

In a similar auction at the end of May, Mexican authorities raised $1.5 million from the sales of 82 vehicles, including a Lamborghini and other assets seized from criminals and at least one former politician.

Credit: @dwnews / Twitter

The late-May auction saw 800 bidders, with the money raised going to two poor communities in the southern state of Oaxaca to improve roads and schools. Seventeen black, bulletproof Chevrolet Suburbans were also up for auction but it was the muscle cars and vintage VWs that got all the attention.

Reactions on Twitter were pretty mixed.

Credit: @BBCWorld / Twitter

A pretty common sentiment across Twitter was that people just wouldn’t feel safe moving into a home that had been seized from a former drug lord. I mean just think of all the risk that carries with it. Like that drug lord still has connections, still has friends – there are still people that are aware of its history. Maybe they’d show up wanting to take it for themselves at some point.

But everyone agreed that giving the proceeds of the auction to help the poor was the right move.

Credit: @BBCWorld / Twitter

Especially since the communities that will benefit from these proceeds are in violence plagued Guerrero state – a state that has suffered greatly because of the Drug War.

13 Facts You Didn’t Know About Tajín

Culture

13 Facts You Didn’t Know About Tajín

Tajín is one of those things that you just don’t question. It’s just always existed–in someone’s purse, on the ring of your margarita, in savory and sweet treats alike. There are no rules when it comes to Tajín. It’s just been in the family since forever.

No matter how ubiquitous Tajín is in your pantry, purse, or every family photo on the mantle, we bet you didn’t know these facts about fruit’s favorite seasoning.

Tajín™ has blessed our people for nearly 35 years.

@tajinonthego / Instagram

But of course, like every other Mexican food company, the flavors are built off traditional Mexican flavors that have been around much longer. We all get to toast our Tajín-rimmed michelada’s to an abuela.

We owe *this* to an abuelita named Mama Necha.

@eloteslapurisima / Instagram

The story goes that Tajín founder Horacio Fernandez was just a boy when his abuela, Necha, would make her signature sauce. He would shout, “Mama Necha made her sauce!” That would set off alarms for friends and family to gather around the table.

Mama Necha would use seven different chiles to make the sauce.

@at_ghost / Instagram

Horacio specifically loved pouring the sauce over a fresh elote. His website describes the “Aha!” moment as “One day, as he delighted in the way the sauce ran down the sides of his corn cob he thought how wonderful it would be if there were a way for the whole world to taste this sauce.”

From then on, Horacio started developing a special process to dehydrate the limes and chiles.

@Elton_Osorio / Twitter

Horacio’s goal with Tajín wasn’t to recreate the exact sauce his abuela created. He wanted to preserve the quality and flavors of the sauce–in a dehydrated form.

Tajín is technically a “powdered sauce.”

@taerimasu / Twitter

It might say ‘seasoning’ on the bottle but, since it’s 1993 year of launch in the U.S. market, Tajín has been a pioneer in the “powdered sauce” category.

Horacio’s powdered his abuela’s recipe so that way he could bring the flavors everywhere he went.

@tajinusa / Instagram

It’s advertised as a way to spice up fruit and vegetables, but we’re all sneaking it’s miniature size into every movie theater like our mamis taught us. The trope that Latinos are spicy is probably because of tajín.

The name came after Horacio visited the Tajín archeological site in Veracruz.

@renistraveler / Instagram

Horacio was on a trip to delve further into Mexico’s rich history. He was mesmerized by the ruins of Tajín, and once he found out “aji” means chile in the Nahuatl language, it was all over for him. He launched his company and named it Tajín in 1985.

Every purchase of Tajín helps support the National School of Ceramics.

“Responsabilidad Social” Digital Image. Tajín. 21 June 2019.

Horacio wanted to make sure that his company did more to preserve Mexican culture. Tajín undoubtedly has made an impact to spread the culture globally, but what about at home?

The school is working to provide Bachelors, Masters and P.h.D. degrees, but for now it’s offering workshops and classes to preserve a cornerstone of Mexican arts.

The bottle label says “THIS IS NOT CANDY” for a reason.

@indulge_gourmetdesserts / Instagram

Apparently, children have been known to eat it straight from the bottle. The seasoning is made of seven different chiles, and, as good as it tastes going down, we imagine children’s tummies couldn’t quite handle it.

Tajín has become part of countless signature drink recipes.

@tajinonthego / Instagram

Granted, most of us just sprinkle Tajín onto every drink. The best micheladas and bloody marys are spiced up with Tajín.

The only covered strawberries Latinos want are chamoy and Tajín covered strawberries.

@sweettreatsbyjazz / Instagram

How good do these spicy strawberries look? Those are chamoy infusers🍓

Tajín leaves people feeling more body positive than before.

@tajinonthego / Instagram

One Tajín fan likes to use the varying size options as a reminder to stay bo-po. Her caption reads, “Just a friendly Tajín reminder to love yourself . We come in all shapes , colors, & sizes. ❤️🧡💛💚💙💜”

Tajín is completely allergen-free and Kosher.

@ashleyfozfit / Instagram

It’s safe for everyone, y’all! Spread the word–Tajín might not have been around B.C. but it’s going to be around for a long, long time.

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