Entertainment

Pabllo Vittar Is The Superstar Brazilian Drag Queen The World Has Come To Love Because Of Their Unapologetic Persona

Pabllo Vittar is a global superstar, a Brazilian drag queen that has broken into the mainstream both in her home country and abroad. With Pride Month in full swing, it is a good time to learn about this gorgeous diva who will be part of the NYC Pride Island 2019 alongside Grace Jones and Teyana Taylor. NYC Pride Island will take place from Saturday, June 29 to Sunday, June 30 at Pier 97 in New York City. Get your awesomeness ready and your dance moves up to scratch everyone! This year is special due to the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall riots when members of the LGBTQ+ community protested against police raids aimed at maiming the community. We couldn’t think of a better performer to honor the brave men and women of Stonewall that could be as appropriate as Pabllo Vittar, who has rejected Brazil’s far-right moves against sexual and gender diversity.

Her full name es digno of an epic Brazilian telenovela.

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Repeat after us: Phabullo Rodrigues da Silva. It has such a nice sound to it. We can almost hear the gorgeous rhythms of samba when we say it.

She was born on born November 1, 1994, in São Luís, Brazil.

Credit: pabllovittar / Instagram

The sea has always been part of her life. Her hometown is a small enclave in the Atlantic Ocean. It is known for its pristine beaches and amazing, golden sunsets.

Pabllo Vittar has a twin sister, because, of course.

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Even though they are not identical, Pabllo Vittar and Phamella are inseparable!

Pabllo Vittar made the jump as a drag superstar in Brazil to the world.

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Pabllo Vittar has garnered an impressive international following. On her Instagram account, she has over 5 million followers from all around the globe. She said during an interview for YouTube Brazil: “People have really embraced my ideas, my work, my engagement”. They sure have! 

Her TV debut was an undeniable success.

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At only 20 years of age, Pabllo Vittar was brave enough to perform on live TV. She performed Whitney Houston’s “I Have Nothing” and the rest, as they say, is history. This is a big deal in Brazil, one of the countries with the highest incidence of hate crimes against sexual and gender minorities. She has always been proud of herself, a symbol of honesty and love.

She became a superstar in 2015. Yeah, just a year after she made her public debut!

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Her video “Open Bar,” a Portuguese-language adaptation of Major Lazer’s “Lean On” was a total success. I just four months it had been watched more than a million times on YouTube. 

Pabllo Vittar has totally broken into the Brazilian mainstream.

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It is not common for drag queens in Latin America to get promotional deals with mainstream companies, but Pabllo Vittar is all about breaking the rules. iFood Brazil, a food delivery app, has signed her, which speaks volumes about the transformational power that Pabllo Vittar has had on popular culture’s perception of drag queens. 

Yes! Yes! Yes! Even Calvin Klein signed her.

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Not only has Pabllo Vittar broken into the mainstream. Calvin Klein Brazil now uses her as a spokesperson, with the My Truth campaign as the wonderful excuse. It pays to be yourself, doesn’t it?

Her debut album Vai Passar Mal was released in early 2017.

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The album’s second single, “Todo Dia”, became a hit in that year’s Carnival celebrations, which pretty much guaranteed her success in the party-crazed nation. Can we please all go to Brazil, Oprah?

But the third single, “K.O” really broke the Internet, at least the Brazilian Internet.

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Is it us or is she giving us total Angelina Jolie vibes here? Anyway, “K.O” has over 400 million views on YouTube. That is B.I.G. Enorme, Pablito!

Pabllo Vittar’s madrina is a legendary Brazilian singer.

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The iconic singer Anitta has taken her under her wing, helping bring Pabllo Vittar into the mainstream through collaborations. This was a great strategy in a country where religious and political intolerance runs rampant, particularly since the election of Bolsonaro, the Brazilian Trump, as president.

Pabllo Vittar grew up without a father and seems to have turned out just fine.

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Pabllo Vittar’s family experienced a lot of hardship. Her mother was a nurse, and she was abandoned by the father when she was pregnant with Pabllo Vittar and her twin sister. Pabllo Vittar had to learn to defend a los suyos from very early on in life. 

As a little boy, Pabllo Vittar was the victim of bullying.

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Because of his tender voice and delicate gestures, and because he attended ballet classes, Pabllo Vittar was bullied by other boys. At one time a plate of hot soup was thrown on his face. This types of experiences shaped the gay rights warrior that Pabllo Vittar is today.

Pabllo Vittar’s artistic beginnings: family parties.

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Pabllo Vittar would sing covers and even his own songs at family parties. Those are some lucky primos.

He came out at 15 and never looked back.

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By that time the mom had remarried. It was all good with the family when Pabllo Vittar came out, which is perhaps the strength, los cimientos, that has allowed for those amazing talents to flourish.

Pabllo Vittar began performing in drag when he was 17.

Credit: pabllovittar / Instagram

At first Pabllo Vittar was only delivering flyers to publicize his friend’s shows but once he dressed up artistic inspiration just started flowing. Soon the makeup would be put on and the extravaganza turned up for gay parades and performances.

Pabllo Vittar’s first drag name: Pabllo Knowles.

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And of course, that was an homage to the queen of all things Black and Brown: Beyonce! Te amamos, reina

By now, Pabllo Vittar is the face and voice of Brazil’s LGBTQ+ community.

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Just five years after doing drag for the first time, the singer-songwriter is already a beacon of hope in an intolerant country. Pabllo Vittar identifies as a gay drag queen and is the face of gender fluidity and just plain awesomeness!

But why did Pabllo Vittar chose a masculine stage name? Honesty.

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Pabllo Vittar is revolutionary in every sense, even in the stage name. Since he doesn’t identify as transgender, Pabllo Vittar was born.

Pabllo Vittar knows what it feels like to be down, so she wants to bring joy through singing.

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Honesty is the best policy. Pabllo Vittar told The Guardian: “When you suffer prejudice, your self-esteem is low, you don’t want to do anything, you don’t want to leave the house”. She found a way out, and her music is an anthem for all who dare to be themselves in a conservative society.

He lives by the motto: “Todo sobre mi madre.”

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At the end, Pabllo Vittar’s story reveals the power that mothers can have in their kid’s futures. Because Pabllo Vittar’s mom was the ideal mami hermosa when her kid came out, millions have benefited from this amazing drag queen’s light. Pabllo Vittar told The Guardian: “Even before my sexuality flowered, my mother already talked very openly about this with me,. My family always really respected me and gave me total freedom to do everything I wanted.” If only every single family was this loving.

READ: Can You Guess The Drag Queen Based Solely On Their Eye Look?

Trans Activists Of Color Protested At The CNN/HRC Equality Town Hall And Audience Members Applauded

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Trans Activists Of Color Protested At The CNN/HRC Equality Town Hall And Audience Members Applauded

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CNN and the Human Rights Campaign (HRC) hosted a historic town hall last night focusing on issues impacting the LGBTQ+ community. The moderators and presidential candidates tackled topics and hard-hitting issues that have severely impacted the lives of millions of LGBTQ+ Americans. The town hall happened as the Supreme Court is deciding if LGBTQ+ people are deserving of the same discrimination protections as all Americans. Here’s what happened last night.

Texas politician Julián Castro made it clear that religion will not be an excuse for LGBTQ+ discrimination in his administration.

There have numerous attempts by local and state governments to legalize religious discrimination against the LGBTQ+ community. The bills, often labeled as Religious Freedom bills, have been proposed in North Carolina and Indiana and failed. North Carolina wanted to legislate what bathroom people had to use and Indiana wanted to give religious organizations and business owners the license to outright discriminate against people based on their faith.

“If I’m elected president, the first order of business on January 20, 2021, will be to have a catalog with all of the different executive actions that this president, this administration, has taken, including exemptions that they’ve created or rolled back that has allowed people to discriminate against the LGBTQ, using as the reason their religion, their excuse their religion,” Castro told an audience member who asked how he will stop religious organizations from using their faith to dictate discriminatory laws. “I will go back to what we did in the Obama administration and then take it to the next level to protect the LGBTQ community. I don’t believe that anybody should be bale to discriminate against you because you are a member of the LGBTQ community. I don’t believe that folks should be getting funding if they’re doing that. I don’t believe that in the healthcare context, the housing context, the employment context that people should be able to do that. I support the Equality Act and will work to pass that. When I was Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, we did the transgender rule, which as I mentioned, expanded the equal access rule so that transgender individuals can find shelter in a manner that they are comfortable with and in accordance to their preference and that’s what I would do as president.”

Castro’s performance during the LGBTQ+ town hall has received praise from LGBTQ+ people.

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Castro was able to speak about the issues impacting the LGBTQ+ community with an understanding that proves he isn’t going off talking points.

His conversation about faith and the license to discriminate showed his understanding of religion and LGBTQ+ people of faith.

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Castro wants to keep religion from attacking the very LGBTQ+ people of faith who depend on it. For many religious LGBTQ+ people, seeing religious leaders claim that their faith doesn’t accept them is a harsh reality.

Trans women of color let their voices be heard in a town hall that largely ignored them.

Mayor Pete Buttigieg was interrupted when he started his time on the stage. Trans activist Bamby Salcedo and other trans women of color stormed the venue holding trans flag that read “We Are Dying.” The women chanted “We are dying” and “Do something.” Some audience members joined the women in their protest however others jumped up to take the flag away and end the protest.

Anderson Cooper, who was moderating for Buttigieg, spoke up for the women as they were escorted out telling the audience, “Let me just point out, there is a long and proud tradition in history in the gay, lesbian and transgender community of protest and we applaud them for their protest.”

Cooper continued saying, “And they are absolutely right to be angry and upset at the lack of attention, particularly in the media, of the lives of transgender [people].”

Another trans activist, Blossom C Brown, also took on the moderators about the lack of Black trans voices during the town hall.

A lot of the conversation during the town hall focused on issues impacting gay men, trans women, and bisexual people. Many are calling out the town hall for ignoring trans people of color, lesbians, and non-binary people when it comes to health, housing, identity expression, and other issues impacting these communities specifically.

Ashlee Marie Preston, the only trans Black woman in the program, was taken out of the program by CNN so she publicly boycotted the event.

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There was a pretty glaring lack of trans women and men of color during the hours of discussion about LGBTQ+ issues. It is a common complaint within the community as trans women of color have long been ignored and silenced within the LGBTQ+ Rights movement.

READ: After Almost Two Years, Trans Activist Alejandra Barrera Has Been Released From ICE Custody

The Supreme Court’s Term Is Starting Off With Major Cases That Will Impact The Lives Of Many Americans

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The Supreme Court’s Term Is Starting Off With Major Cases That Will Impact The Lives Of Many Americans

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The nine justices of the Supreme Court will return to the chambers to an explosive docket. The court is set to hear cases covering an array of social issues from abortion to DACA to LGBTQ+ discrimination to the Second Amendment. It is shaping up to be a major term for the highest court in the land.

The Supreme Court is getting ready to hear a series of cases that could impact some of the biggest social issues in American culture.

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All eyes are on the Supreme Court as major cases are being presented. Some of the cases included in the docket for this term of the Supreme Court are the fate of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), the definition of “sex” as it pertains to Title 7 of the Civil Rights Act and the LGBTQ community’s right to work without discrimination, an abortion case from Louisiana seeking to limit abortion rights, and a gun regulation from New York City.

On Oct. 8, the Supreme Court heard arguments about discrimination protections for LGBTQ+ people.

In almost half of the country, there are no laws protecting people in the LGBTQ+ community from being discriminated against in the workplace. The Supreme Court heard arguments from two gay men and one trans woman claiming that they were fired from their places of work because of their identity.

During oral arguments, when the employers being sued in the case argued that sex is different than same-sex attraction, Justice Elena Kagan suggested that the law does favor the employees.

“If he were a woman, he wouldn’t have been fired,” Justice Kagan told General Solicitor Noel Francisco, who is representing the employers. “This is the usual kind of way in which we interpret statutes now. We look to laws. We don’t look to predictions. We don’t look to desires. We don’t look to wishes. We look to laws.”

The Trump administration is aiming to get rid of DACA protections from almost 700,000 young people.

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DACA is a program that was first created by President Obama. It gave almost 700,000 young immigrants who came to the U.S. as children the chance to go to college, get work permits, and protected them from deportation. The Trump administration ended the program in 2017 and immediately threw the lives of all DACA recipients in limbo.

United We Dream, a DACA-led media company filed its own brief with the Supreme Court. The brief is a first-of-its-kind video brief with DACA recipients arguing their case for preserving DACA. The organization also included an official written brief.

“DACA has accomplished far more than affording deferred prosecutorial action. It has created lifechanging opportunities for hundreds of thousands of promising young people. DACA has allowed them to lead fuller and more vibrant lives, including by seizing opportunities to advance their education, furthering their careers, providing critical help to their families, and giving back to their communities,” reads the United We Dream brief. “Able to make use of the basic building blocks of a productive life—a Social Security number, work authorization, or driver’s license, for example—DACA recipients have thrived. They are students, teachers, health care workers, first responders, community leaders, and small business owners. They are also spouses, neighbors, classmates, friends, and coworkers. Collectively, they are parents of over a quarter-million U.S. citizens, and 70% of DACA recipients have an immediate family member who is a U.S. citizen. They pay taxes, contribute to their local economies in myriad ways, and spur a virtuous cycle of further opportunity for many Americans.”

Another case people are watching is an abortion case coming out of Louisiana.

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The case, June Medical Services v. Gee, isn’t aiming to overturn Roe v. Wade but it is hoping to limit the abortion rights of women starting in Louisiana. The law being challenged requires all abortion providers to get privileges are a hospital 30 miles from where the abortions take place.

The case is very similar to a Texas case that the Supreme Court rejected three terms ago. As such, the Louisiana case is asking the Supreme Court to distinguish between the two cases and to determine that the restriction is legitimate if a legislator vouches that the restriction is valid rather than it being valid in practice. As it stands, the law would leave just one doctor in the state of Louisiana allowed to perform abortions.

Another case getting some attention as it sits on the Supreme Court docket deals with the Second Amendment.

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New York City’s original rule made it so handguns could only be transported to seven gun ranges throughout the city. While the case was originally contested because of the rule. New York City changed the rule and asked the court to dismiss the case as moot, but the court rejected the motion. This will be the first time the Supreme Court has heard a case about the Second Amendment’s reach in over a decade and is being hailed as a victory for gun rights advocates.

READ: DACA Advocates Shut Down Joe Biden At Last Night’s Democratic Debate, Here’s The Message They Delivered Loud And Clear