Entertainment

It’s Just Around The Corner! ‘One Day At A Time’ Has An Official Return Date

It’s almost here, mi gente! 

Your favorite Cuban-American family is set to make its second television debut, this time on Pop TV, this coming Spring. After being canceled by Netflix earlier this year, the Alvarez family will prove that Cubanos can withstand just about anything when they return in March 2020 with 13 new episodes. 

Speaking recently about the series, writers for the show have given fans a few hints about what to expect. 

The “One Day At A Time” writer’s room is only a few weeks into creating the series, but they’re proving the show will be back with fervor. 

Netflix

Speaking during a Vulture Festival panel the series’ writers boasted that its new home on Pop TV means some pretty exciting things for the Alvarez family. Now, instead of streaming all at once, the new season will run weekly. 

“We’re so excited!” creator Gloria Calederon Kellett told Vulture during the panel. “We get to have a breath between each episode.” Creators behind the show have said that the decision to do a weekly release schedule comes with the hope that it will mean more consistent audience engagement with the show. Because of the show’s shorter airing window, Pop TV hopes to introduce more topical and poignant storylines. Which is pretty incredible considering the series was already doing that pretty well to begin with. All of this also means that the series will have a more traditional network sitcom runtime and format. I.E.L commercials.

The news was a pretty big surprise to EGOT  Rita Moreno who exclaimed incredulously during the panel: “We’re gonna have commercials?!” 

 “I’m sorry,” Maria Elena Fernandez, a moderator for the Vulture panel replied to Moreno during the reveal. “I didn’t mean to break it to you this way.”

Creators of the show also teased some series storylines which might include seeing  Moreno’s Lydia character falling in love with Dr. Berkowitz who is played by Stephen Tobolowsky.

Earlier this year, when news that Netflix had canceled the critically acclaimed show “One Day at a Time” hit Twitter, many were feared the entire site would be burned down. News that the beloved comedy-drama, which followed the life of a Cuban American family, had officially been canceled spurned various criticisms of Netflix and backlash from the show’s fanbase. Netflix users decried the decision accusing the site of giving POC viewers low priority and nearly no visibility through its shows. Some canceled their Netflix accounts altogether and even started hashtags to do the same. To say the least, fans were devastated.  

So when the TV channel PopTV announced that fans had convinced them enough to save the series and buy it for their own, Latino viewers were beyond elated.

Earlier this fall it became officially official that the Alvarez family is truly returning.

According to an image shared straight from the “One Day At A Time’s” writer’s room, creators of the series are already tapping out the new season’s scripts. On Monday, ODAAT’s series producer Mike Royce posted an image of the series’ sign at their new offices on Twitter. In his post, he revealed that the writers would start working on the show this past Wednesday.

If it’s three other earlier seasons can be any indication, ODAAT’s 4th season will undoubtedly be a major hit. Since its 2017 debut, the series starring EGOT winner Rita Moreno and actress Justina Machado has garnered copious amounts of praise from fans and critics for its portrayal of Latix culture in today’s Post-Trump world. For its work in portraying the trials and tribulations of its diverse LGBTQ+  and Latin American characters. The series has also tackled political issues related to Trump-inspired racist attacks and slurs as well as the portrayal of mental health in the military community. 

When news that PopTV had saved the beloved series, nearly everyone was elated.

No doubt, decisions to buy the show had been motivated by petitions and hashtags to #SaveODAAT. Various Latino names in the entertainment industry began to tweet about the series in support. This included Broadway star and Hamilton hitmaker Lin-Manuel Miranda who posted a series of tweets to his Twitter account to #SaveODAAT as well.

When it was finally announced that the series had been saved by Pop TV the outlet’s president, Brad Schwartz, released a statement saying “How amazing it is to be involved with this brilliant and culturally significant series that deals with important themes one minute while making you laugh the next. We couldn’t be more proud to continue telling heartwarming stories of love, inclusion, acceptance, and diversity that pull on your emotions while putting a smile on your face.”

Needless to say, as pleased as fans are for the new series and its renewal, they really can’t wait.

I mean basically, at this point it is kind of a tragedy that we have to wait. But everyone is still pumped. And for real ready for production and streaming to begin. Because this show is a gift beyond gifts.

With so much representation, there’s literally a character for everyone to feel seen. 

One user in the comments section of Mike Royce’s thread pointed out that the show isn’t just for those who are Latino.”I showed my Cuban spouse the episode not yet yesterday and we were all bawling on the couch frequently pausing for them to talk about how their Mami would also say try again tomorrow and how every time they were in hospital the entire family showed up,” user @danielzklein said. “I’m just saying this show is a god damned gift to the world. How is it so good and so heartfelt and so brave to go to dark places without the copout of a joke at the most intense moment and how is it still so laugh out loud funny the rest of the time.” 

And more importantly, this series is a savior in so many ways.

And not only are we beyond excited that the series means more representation on screen. It also means the Rita Moreno remains employed and on our screens.

Yes to ODAAT and the power of its fans!

‘One Day At A Time’ Has An Update About The Theme Song That Has Fans Angry

Entertainment

‘One Day At A Time’ Has An Update About The Theme Song That Has Fans Angry

Netflix

Fans of the Netflix series One Day at a Time were likely disappointed to learn that the streaming service cancelled the show after its third season. But if you count yourself as an enthusiast, you’re probably doing a little happy dance at the news that the show will appear on basic cable TV this spring—the first time a cable network has revived a cancelled streaming series and kept it from disappearing into the ether. Pop TV announced that Season 4 of One Day at a Time will launch on Tuesday, March 24 at 9:30/8:30 CT, and the network released the following sneak peek at what’s to come:

“This season will find Penelope exploring a surprising relationship, her mother Lydia experiencing a religious crisis (as well as revealing the details of her surprise trip to Cuba with Dr. Berkowitz), and Schneider finding his relationship with Avery growing deeper. Meanwhile, Elena begins to prepare for college and Alex starts to date.”

Lots to look forward to! But as we prepare for the next iteration of the show, why don’t we take a quick look at its history? How did One Day at a Time begin, and how did it evolve into a beloved reflection of contemporary Latinx family life?

One Day at a Time first aired back in 1975, centering on a white family—a single mom and two kids, just like the current version—who lived in Indianapolis, rather than LA. It was based on the experience of Whitney Blake, one of the show’s creators, as a single mom (which, at the time, was pretty revolutionary—single parenthood was not nearly as common as it is today!). The original show explored the family’s life in the midst of divorce, something that was still pretty taboo in that era, and although it was a sitcom steeped in laughs and levity, it also highlighted the difficulties of navigating the world as a single mother.

Fast forward to 2017. One Day at a Time reemerges on Netflix, and while the same basic storyline is still there, the aura of the show is totally different (and a lot more complex). Instead of focusing on a white family, the new One Day at a Time follows the story of Penelope Alvarez, a US Army Nurse Corps veteran who struggles with her return to civilian life. Alvarez separates from her husband, who had also served in the army, due to erratic behavior caused by alcoholism and PTSD—but Alvarez herself also suffers from PTSD, a conflict that adds an important dimension to the show by offering a glimpse into a mental health reality that affects large swaths of people yet is often overlooked. So, Penelope Alvarez must not simply face the challenges of single motherhood: she must also battle with the lingering trauma of combat, all while trying to manage the stresses of quotidian life in a Cuban-American family.

One Day at a Time has been lauded for its authentic portrayal of relevant social questions that are of particular importance to the Latinx community—from immigration to LGBTQ issues, One Day at a Time gracefully addresses a wide spectrum of topical concerns.

Credit: Netflix

It’s true: One Day at a Time features characters facing the intense process of applying for citizenship. It shares the story of a character who doesn’t want to celebrate her quinceañera, who ruminates about the right time to tell her family she’s queer. It challenges gender expectations by introducing its audience to non-binary characters. In certain ways, it mirrors the original series in its willingness to address sensitive yet important issues that resemble the lives of people all over the US. Perhaps that’s part of why it’s been so well-received, and why Pop TV is willing to give it another chance.

Regarding the show’s resurrection on regular network TV, Brad Schwartz, President of Pop TV, said the following in a statement: “The enthusiastic response from fans since announcing our new season of One Day at a Time has been thrilling. “The series is more important than ever with its unmatched ability to tackle topical social issues through the lens of a relatable, loving family. The exceptionally talented team behind and in front of the camera make us proud to have One Day at a Time at home at Pop TV.”

The cast is totally lovable, super talented, and deeply engaging—so much of the praise for this show surrounds the fabulous actors at the helm. It’s been called “timely and tender,” “flat-out terrific,” “old fashioned and surprisingly new-fashioned,” and if you haven’t yet tuned in to this critically acclaimed series, make sure you catch up on Seasons 1-3 before the new season premieres in March!

The View Has Been On Air For 22 Years And The Drama Has Hardly Ever Been Scarce: Here Are Some Of The Biggest Feuds

Entertainment

The View Has Been On Air For 22 Years And The Drama Has Hardly Ever Been Scarce: Here Are Some Of The Biggest Feuds

On Tuesday morning, Abby Huntsman, one of the latest conservative voices on The View, announced she was leaving the long-running ABC daytime show to help run her father Jon Huntsman Jr.’s campaign for Utah governor. Of course, this was only the ‘official reason’. In its nearly 22 years on air, the show has seen some extremely tense moments —read on to find out about a few of them. 

Today, I’m saying goodbye,” Huntsman said of going to work with her dad, the Republican politician and former U.S. Ambassador to Russia. 

“It’s not often in life that you get these moments to go fight for something that you are so passionate about.” Of course, there’s always an official explanation and a rumored-to-be-more-real one. In this case, there were reports, including one from CNN Business, claiming Huntsman was fleeing the show’s “toxic culture” 

The View has gone from coffee klatch to political roundtable and back again in since it debuted in 1997.

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What a crew @mikebloomberg @theviewabc

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These days, it’s been coined “the most important political TV show in America”—a must-stop on the presidential candidates’ press tour. Losing Huntsman also means the loss of a vocal conservative in that political crossfire—a host who actually wanted to welcome recent guest Donald Trump Jr. But one constant on the show is, well, the drama. The Huntsman-McCain conflict is only the latest in a long line of View feuds, blowups, and scandalous exits in the show’s 23-season history. 

Ahead, a look at the high (low?) lights, in chronological order:

Barbara Walters versus Debbie Matenopoulos

When Walters launched The View in 1997, she cast/hired 22-year-old Matenopoulos. Debbie reportedly drew Walters’s ire when she couldn’t quite hold her own among the original five, including Joy Behar, Star Jones, and Meredith Vieira. Matenopoulos was frequently mocked on Saturday Night Live for being ditzy. Plus, she apparently partied too much for the boss’s taste. “After Debbie had gotten written up in ‘Page Six’ for taking her top off at Hogs & Heifers, Barbara counseled her on not tarnishing her name as a public figure.” Matenopoulos was fired in 1999 and replaced by hard-hitting journalist Lisa Ling.

Elisabeth Hasselbeck versus Rosie O’Donnell

O’Donnell only appeared for two brief stints on The View, but still managed to lock horns with ex-Survivor contestant Elisabeth Hasselbeck in a viral nearly 10-minute-long on-air debate about the Iraq War in 2007. (O’Donnell had pressed Hasselbeck to back her up that she had never equated American troops with “terrorists”; Hasselbeck balked.) “Here’s how it gets spun in the media: ‘Rosie, big, fat, lesbian, loud Rosie, attacks innocent, pure, Christian Elisabeth,’” O’Donnell later said. She left the show that year: “The day it happened, I was definitely crying,” O’Donnell told Variety

Whoopi Goldberg versus Rosie O’Donnell

O’Donnell and Goldberg clashed in 2009, when O’Donnell expressed her disagreement with Goldberg’s assertion that director Roman Polanski hadn’t committed “rape rape,” despite having pled guilty to statutorily raping then-13-year-old Samantha Geimer in 1979. Goldberg supposedly sent O’Donnell an “angry letter,” and O’Donnell says she responded diplomatically, writing her own letter apologizing for any hurt feelings.

But when O’Donnell returned to The View in 2014 and offered up contributions to the daytime talk show — like starting the morning meeting a half-hour earlier and covering the Bill Cosby rape allegations — Goldberg shut down her ideas, she claimed. And the tension played out on television, too.

Barbara Walters versus Jenny McCarthy

Walters tapped McCarthy to join The View in 2013, a year before Walters herself left the show. According to McCarthy, this made for a power struggle. “Imagine a woman like Barbara Walters,” McCarthy said in Ladies Who Punch. “It’s her last year, and she doesn’t want to leave…. And I’m the new bitch there.” The two reportedly fought over who would moderate debates, and also sanitary products, with Walters reportedly demanding McCarthy change her outfits and, once, chastising her over a tampon left in a toilet (one McCarthy says was not hers).

Joy Behar versus Meghan McCain

The honor of splashiest feud in the modern era of The View goes to stalwart Behar and Meghan McCain. In 2018, they got into it over Trump once again: “I really come here every day open-minded, just trying to explain it, and it’s not a fun job for me every day,” McCain said. When Behar made a pitying “aww” sound, McCain snapped: “Oh, don’t feel bad for me, bitch, I’m paid to do this, okay?” After a little more back and forth, Whoopi Goldberg threw to a commercial break: “I just need everybody to take a beat.”