Entertainment

Mon Laferte Goes Topless At 2019 Latin Grammys To Protest Violence In Chile

Mon Laferte stunned everyone on the red carpet of the 2019 Latin Grammys in Las Vegas last night. The 36-year-old singer-songwriter and winner of Best Alternative Music Album appeared topless to make a political statement about police brutality in Chile. 

There have been violent protests in Chile after the government announced a new hike in subway fares during a time when wealth inequality has left many Chileans wanting. No doubt, Mon Laferte’s move was attention-grabbing — she’s making headlines and bringing the struggle of her people to the public’s attention in the process. 

Mon Laferte bares it all to make an important statement. 

Laferte appeared on the red carpet wearing a long black trench coat with black pants and a green bandana tied around her neck. She stunned photographers when she stepped forward, opened her coat, and revealed that she was completely topless. Written across her decollete in capitalized letters was “En Chile Torturan Violan Y Matan,” or “In Chile, they torture, rape, and kill.” 

On Instagram, she captioned a photo with her nipples censored to meet Instagram’s nudity guidelines, “My free body for a free country.” In another pose, Laferte shared that Instagram banned the hashtag #monlaferte because photos of her bare breasts circulated on the social platform. 

Laferte won Best Alternative Music Album for the album Norma. She dedicated the award to Chile in her speech. 

“I want to thank my colleagues … and especially to the public, the people, the fans that are there; without people nothing could happen,” the “El Beso” singer said. 

Laferte released a new protest single with Guaynaa, “Plata Ta Tá.”

Laferte’s new single with Puerto Rican artist Guaynaa, “Plata Ta Tá” is about fighting for your rights. The single artwork is a censored photo of her breasts. 

 “This generation has the revolution, with their cell phone they have more power than Donald Trump,” Laferte sings on the track. 

The reggaeton track is an anthem sure to get you hyped at the next protest.  “Go out, go out / go fight, go fight / Let’s make the world listen,” Guaynaa chants in his verse. 

Chileans protest the government’s increase in subway fares. 

Chileans began demonstrating against the government’s subway fare hike in October, but things quickly escalated as police began to use force, killing at least 20 people so far. One million people took to the streets of one of the wealthiest countries in Latin America to protest economic inequality. 

“The promise that political leaders from the left as well as right have made for decades — that free markets would lead to prosperity, and prosperity would take care of other problems — has failed them,” according to the New York Times

Protests have gone on for weeks. President Sebastián Piñera decided against the fare increase but he also deployed the military on civilians for the first time since the country became a democracy in 1990. The protest continued and the President promised better social programs on TV, but the demonstrators were not convinced. 

Violence has escalated in Chile with reports from the Associated Press saying police have begun shooting protestors in the eyes with shotgun pellets. At least 230 people, according to the country’s main medical body, have lost sight after being shot in the eye while demonstrating last month. At least 50 people will need prosthetic eyes. 

 “This means that the patient doesn’t only lose their vision, but they lose their actual eye,” said Dr. Patricio Meza, vice president of the Medical College of Chile. “We are facing a real health crisis, a health emergency given that in such few days, in three weeks, we have had the highest number of cases involving serious ocular complications due to shots in the eye.” 

Chile’s congress agreed to reform the country’s constitution. 

Today, Chile’s congress agreed to reform the nation’s constitution in hopes of ending the ongoing protests that have been run amuck with police brutality. “This has become possible thanks to the citizens who have been mobilized,” Chilean Senate President Jaime Quintana announced at a news conference in Santiago today. 

Quintana promised the new constitution would “build a true social contract” that would be “100 percent democratic,” according to CNN. The referendum will ask voters if the current constitution, created in 1980 by the dictator Augusto Pinochet, should be replaced. 

“This agreement is a first step, but it is a historic and fundamental first step to start building our new social pact, and in this, the citizenry will have a leading role,” said Interior Minister Gonzalo Blumel.

There will be different models for the body proposed. Voters will be asked if they prefer the body consist of elected representatives, political appointees, or a mix of both, according to Al Jazeera. Whether the new promises will be enough to satisfy the unrest in Chile will remain to be seen. 

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Chilean Actor Jorge López Is The New Netflix Heartthrob Every Needs To Know About

Entertainment

Chilean Actor Jorge López Is The New Netflix Heartthrob Every Needs To Know About

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Netflix has a good eye in finding and showcasing some incredible talent in Latin America. The streaming giant produces shows like “La Casa de las Flores” and “Siempre Bruja.” “Élite” is another Spanish-language show produced for Netflix and one of the newest members in Chilean heartthrob Jorge López. Let’s take a moment to appreciate López.

Chilean actor Jorge López is one star that is one the rise.

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Ni tan malo 👾

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The 28-year-old is one of the actors in Netflix’s “Élite.” The drama is about three well-to-do teenagers living in Spain and the usual telenovela drama and situations ensue.

López plays Valerio Montesinos Hendrich for Netflix’s “Élite.”

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📸💋 #Elit3 @icanteachyou

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Valerio is the brother of Luceria Montesinos Hendrich, played by Danna Paola. His addition to the show just shows the growing role of Latin American talent in Netflix productions. The show was produced in Spain and is currently in its third season.

López got his first big break thanks to Disney Channel Latin America.

López was cast as a main character on the Disney Channel Latin America telenovela “Soy Luna” in 2016. Over the course of two years, López was in 220 episodes of “Soy Luna.” We got to see López show off his singing and dancing chops while in “Soy Luna” and it further solidified his future in the entertainment business.

Now, let’s just take a moment to appreciate the man behind the characters.

Everyone tries to do the cool, almost candid pool shot with the shirt ever so carelessly opened. It is fair to say that López delivered on this look. He was able to hit the pose just right and we are all better for having this pop up on social media.

You’ve gotta appreciate a man who can accessorize his outfit without going overboard.

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Fresquito el bad bunny

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Legit, where do we get that fan? It just seems like one of those things that we need in our repertoire. Fans are super in and there is nothing wrong with wanting to jump on a bandwagon, especially if it is fashion. Right?

The actor is stunning even when he is rocking an overload of fake tattoos.

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🎃

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Of course, the tattoos are the first things you will notice in this photo are all of the tattoos. But we have some questions. What is going on with the fak blood from the ear? What is this for? That nail polish, however, is *chef’s kiss*.

People who can embrace their less than gorgeous side are truly beautiful creatures.

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🥱

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Being goofy is just as sexy as looking sexy. López is a great example of what that kind of effortless sexy looks like. It is about confidence and it is obvious that this man is just dripping with confidence, as he should. Just look at him.

Thank you, Netflix. We appreciate being able to get to know López a little more.

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@suspiciousantwerp the love never disappears

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You can check out “Élite” on Netflix to see more of López. We could all use a new novela to watch right now to get ourselves out of our current routines.

READ: Look At These 25 Maluma Thirst Posts That We Definitely Double Tapped

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Chile Is Testing Out Immunity Cards For People Who Have Been Cured Of The Virus

Things That Matter

Chile Is Testing Out Immunity Cards For People Who Have Been Cured Of The Virus

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Chile is asking itself the same question that many of us are asking ourselves: when is “this” going to end, when will we be able to return to the life we knew before the pandemic, or at least how to begin to recover what used to be normal life.

For governments, the priority seems to be jump starting their economies amid a global pandemic. Some states in the U.S. are already reopening non-essential businesses (like gyms and beaches…really?!) while countries like Mexico are allowing most businesses to stay open so long as they practice social distancing measures.

Chile – which was in the throes of a nationwide lockdown – has decided to take a different approach. The government there plans to allow those in low risk groups and those who have already been infected with the virus and have recovered to return to near normal activities. But at what cost?

Chile plans to issue the world’s first Coronavirus immunity cards.

The country’s health officials confirmed plans to be the first country to issue coronavirus “immunity passports,” which would allow individuals who have recovered from COVID-19 to go back to work. Health Ministry Undersecretary Paula Daza said that 4,600 people have recovered from the deadly virus. According to officials, those citizens can “help the community enormously” by getting back to work. Chile has tested more people for the coronavirus than any other country in Latin America.

In principle, people who have tested positive for COVID-19 and have been symptom-free for 14 days or more will be eligible for antibody testing. Chile has a population over more than 19 million people, so the roughly 4,600 people who would receive these ‘immunity cards’ make up a very small segment of the population.

If the strategy works, the ID cards could – little by little – help Chile reopen its economy and get its population back to work. But the strategy isn’t without risks.

From a flourishing black market to several unknowns related to the Coronavirus – the government’s plan has many risks.

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If there is an ID card that would enable to you to take to the streets, get back to work, and return to a somewhat normal life – you would want it right? And so will many others – including those who have not yet developed any anti-bodies to the virus and are still at-risk. That’s what has many officials worried about Chile’s ID plan. It could create a black market for fake immunity cards.

Not only does this pose a threat of at-risk populations getting fake immunity cards – but since they’ll likely be available at a cost most Chileans can’t afford, this leaves only the privileged able to get them.

Chile says they will certify immunity, but does it even exist?

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The idea that a person who recovers from COVID-19 can be immune to the virus has its foundations in the way the human body reacts to thousands of other viruses that we live with in our daily lives.

Since there is no specific treatment for COVID-19 at this time, the goal is to keep the patient as stable as possible while his or her immune system copes with the virus. To this extent, it is understood that those who manage to recover have developed the necessary antibodies to do so. Some recovered patients are having their antibodies ‘harvested’ to inject into other patients still battling the disease.

However, the World Health Organization has explicitly discouraged the issuance of immunity cards because the presence of antibodies simply indicates that the body has reacted to the virus, not necessarily proof of immunity.

So far, Chile has had a well-planned response to the pandemic and has escaped much of the turmoil of other countries in South America.

Local governments have instituted rolling quarantine orders in different locations based upon number of new cases, access to medical care, and the percentage of elderly residents. They also instituted complete lockdowns, closed the borders to all travel, and instituted overnight curfews to limit people’s movements. The measures seem to be working.

Chile has seen roughly 12,000 confirmed cases of the virus but less than 200 deaths. The country has also initiated widespread testing, which is why the government is so confident in its plan to issue these immunity cards.

“We are doing well, so far, but it’s too soon to declare victory,” said Paula Bedregal, a public health expert and professor at the medical school of Universidad Catolica de Chile. “We aren’t in winter yet, when things can get more complicated, and the virus is starting to appear more among more vulnerable groups.”

Bedregal added that real information is lacking in some of the poorest areas, making it harder to know if the system in place will continue to succeed.

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