Entertainment

Miguel Was Once A Preacher And Then He Discovered The Power Of His Own Music

We all know Miguel as the R&B heartthrob shaking up the genre with his indie pop and soul influences. His breakout album, Kaleidoscope dream (2012) put him on the map, right alongside contemporaries. Frank Ocean, Kendrick Lamar, and The Weeknd.

Before he made it on the map, he was kind of a shy kid, and deeply religious. If you thought he was born a sex god, you’re wrong. He confesses that he was a “very late bloomer” in life.

Born as Miguel Jontel Pimentel, the singer is just 33 years old.

CREDIT: Credit: @miguel / Instagram

He was born and raised in San Pedro, California, a beach town. His mother is African-American and his father is Mexican-American. His parents divorced when he was eight years old, and lived under his mother’s roof.

Miguel has written songs about the struggle of being Afro-Latino.

CREDIT: Credit: @miguel / Instagram

In “What’s Normal Anyway?,” he sings Too proper for the black kids / Too black for the Mexicans.”  He told NME that he used to really struggle with that growing up but he’s in acceptance around his identity today.

In 2017, Miguel traveled to Zamora to visit his Mexican side of the family for the first time.

CREDIT: Credit: @miguel / Instagram

His own grandmother used to sing at the radio station that they ended up visiting. He sang his cover of “Contigo” by Los Planchos as a tribute to his Nana. “I haven’t felt the kind of nervousness that I did at the radio station. Ever. You want to make your family proud. And I think that’s a different kind of pressure,” he said according to Latino USA.

His mother didn’t let him go to parties.

CREDIT: Credit: @miguel / Instagram

“My mother was really into her religion, and I was, too, to be honest with you,” he tells The Guardian. “But at the same time I was torn, because as a kid you want to do things. And my mom was very keen on keeping me away from temptation. “

Miguel didn’t really have any friends in high school.

CREDIT: Credit: @miguel / Instagram

“I was not a part of the social scene in high school. I wasn’t going to parties, I wasn’t drinking, I wasn’t smoking, I definitely wasn’t smoking weed, I wasn’t having sex,” he tells all to The Guardian. “Late bloomer. Really late bloomer.”

Feeling out of place both ethnically and socially was the inspiration for “What’s Normal Anyway?”

CREDIT: Credit: @miguel / Instagram

When his musician brother Nicholas listened to the song for the first time, he wept. “On top of the normal inadequacies and insecurities that you feel in your adolescence,” he tells The Guardian.

You add the layer of wanting to connect with people and then having to keep a safe distance based on what you’re being taught, your spirituality, and that adds a whole other confusing layer. As much as people knew me, it’s not like I had friends.”

It was his Mexican father who introduced him to music and encouraged him to live a little.

CREDIT: Credit: @miguel / Instagram

His father, who is a teacher, would tell him about all the crazy things he did at his age and encouraged him to step out of line. Miguel was too afraid to betray his mother and the religiosity he was so entrenched in.

Miguel would go door to door preaching the bible as a teenager.

CREDIT: Credit: @miguel / Instagram

His mother is a preacher as well and always wanted him to grow up to become a preacher. She never expected he would become a famous musician.

When he went to college, he discovered sex, drugs, and music.

CREDIT: Credit: @miguel / Instagram

He stopped going to church and bible studies and started forming his own path. “I’m still very much in touch with my spirituality. I never gave up on God,” he told The Guardian. “I just found my own way.”

Today, Miguel is a Grammy award winning artist (and sex symbol, let’s be real.)

CREDIT: Credit: @miguel / Instagram

Since his first album release, “All I Want is You,” he’s released three more albums, all of which have reached mass critical acclaim. Critics love to compare his vocals to Prince, and he ships it.

His most swoon-worthy quality? Dedicating his awards to his Nana.

CREDIT: Credit: @miguel / Instagram

Caption: “dedicating this award to my Nana, thank you @almaawards

Miguel also uses his platform for good.

CREDIT: Credit: @miguel / Instagram

Caption: “This dude put his is whole career, everything he worked his whole life for on the line to shed light on injustice in this country only to be treated unfairly and black balled and he hasn’t stopped. Cant think of anyone better suited to deliver this message.”

Fun fact: He usually wears a calavera on his ring finger.

CREDIT: Credit: @miguel / Instagram

He told The Guardian, “I always wear this ring on this finger, the skull with a sombrero. The skull is a reminder that we don’t live forever.” As for the sombrero? “Well, you know, I’m Latino, so it just felt right.”

He has “Amar hasta la muerte” tattooed on his body.

CREDIT: Credit: @miguel / Instagram

“Which means ‘Love me to death’ or ‘Love till death’, depending on how you interpret it,” he told The Guardian.

He’s been with model and actor Nazanin Mandi for over a decade.

CREDIT: Credit: @miguel / Instagram

Yeah. We’re swooning. The guy is committed. You might recognize her from his music video for “Coffee.”

The two got married in late 2018.

CREDIT: Credit: @miguel / Instagram

If you follow @miguel at all, you also know that he’s obsessed with her butt. Like, every post with her is about her butt. 😂

They both have queen of diamonds tattoos.

CREDIT: Credit: @miguel / Instagram

They’ve never revealed the meaning, but we know that they do want to have kids at some point. Making every Mexican dad proud at this point.

While Miguel is definitely in the social scene these days, his spirituality looks different.

CREDIT: Credit: @miguel / Instagram
He’s a big fan of transcendental meditation. “It’s good to take a breath from everything and just center yourself. That is the best way of describing it,” he told Hot 93.7 station.

The goal of his music is to leave fans feeling encouraged.

CREDIT: Credit: @miguel / Instagram

After a tour, he told The Guardian, “I know the fans go away with something greater than just music. Yes, they come and hear the songs they like – I’ve got a great band, all my stuff is great – but the most important thing is, they leave encouraged. They leave believing in themselves.”

“I want to give people as much of myself as possible.”

CREDIT: Credit: @miguel / Instagram

Soak it all up on with his latest drop “Wildheart” released under RCA Records.

READ: Miguel Has Chosen His Side In The Major League Soccer Battle For Los Angeles

Ranchero Star ‘Paquita La Del Barrio’ Was Hospitalized Due To Pulmonary Complications

Entertainment

Ranchero Star ‘Paquita La Del Barrio’ Was Hospitalized Due To Pulmonary Complications

We still haven’t recovered from the passing of ‘El príncipe de la canción’ José José and we’re already being hit with more bad news. After much speculation on social media, it has been confirmed that the controversial and iconic singer Paquita La del Barrio was hospitalized this week for pneumonia and pulmonary thrombosis. 

Paquita La del Barrio changed the genre of Bolero music forever with her salty man-hating lyrics and ‘borrachera’ worthy songs.

credit Instagram @paquitaofficialb

In her over 50 years of creating music, ‘La Guerrillera del Bolero’, Paquita la del Barrio has gifted us with endless beautifully shady catchphrases to use on shitty exes; “Rata de dos patas”, “Cucaracha del infierno” and “¿Me estas oyendo inútil?” to name a few. Her man-hating words changed Bolero music for women and will be sung in tequila-induced ‘borracheras’ until the end of time. Paquita’s controversial, and sometimes salty lyrics have earned her a few enemies, to say the least, but the truth is that Paquita La del Barrio shattered glass ceilings in the genre of Ranchero, a world of male-dominated, misogynistic music, just by speaking her mind through music.

The feminist ranchera canceled a show for the first time in her career, due to health complications.

Francisca Viveros Barradas a self-proclaimed warrior against ‘machismo’ culture, canceled a show scheduled for this Saturday in Matamoros, Tamaulipas, due to health complications. Francisco Torres, her manager —also known as Paquito— said in a public statement for the press, that Paquita had complained of ongoing chest pains which eventually landed her at Hospital Angeles Lindavista in Mexico City. “Siempre te imaginas lo peor,” he said. It was later discovered that the pain was caused by a pulmonary embolism and pneumonia. The 72-year-old singer was checked into intensive care for a 24-hour watch.

Torres confirmed that Paquita’s health first raised concerns on October 8,  “She started with discomfort, her blood pressure, she said her chest hurt. That night the situation worsened, she couldn’t stand, she complained about chest pain, and the first thing that came to mind was ‘her heart’. A doctor came,  prescribed medication and administered her a sedative, we thought she’d be better by morning. But she wasn’t.”

The singer’s health is now improving and she’s no longer in ICU.

Credit Instagram @paquitaoficialb

‘Paquito’ went on to describe how the star’s health continued to deteriorate; “The next day she still had chest and back pain,” he said, “we decided to call an ambulance and take her to the emergency room.” Paquita La del Barrio’s manager explained that doctors diagnosed the singer with pulmonary damage due to the varying weather conditions the 72-year-old had been exposed to during her tour of the United States. “We know that weather conditions in the U.S. are more extreme, that was added to her condition, she resisted until her lungs collapsed,” Torres confirmed that Paquita la del Barrio was in ICU on October 10 but is now stable and her health is improving. It seems like the singer is recuperating just fine, but will still need time to heal, which is why she was forced to cancel the concert scheduled for this weekend. 

‘La Guerrillera del Bolero’ has sung against machismo for over forty years, and although she’s received a lot of criticism, her words have resonated with audiences worldwide.

https://media.giphy.com/media/4WF1hyGS2osH6/giphy.gif

Way ahead of her time, Paquita has fought machismo singing from the stage for more than four decades. At 72, the feminist ranchera has released 33 albums which have been classified by the genre as “duros contra ellos” for her harsh words against men. Amongst her many shade-throwing songs are “Tres veces te engañé”, “Las mujeres mandan”, “Viejo raboverde”, “Hombres malvados” and many more. Her most famous hit “Rata de dos patas”, which has become somewhat of a hymn against men, was the song that sky-rocketed Paquita to fame. After this song went public, she went from singing at bars in the popular Mexico City neighborhood ‘Guerrero’, and moved on to perform on stages internationally.

Paquita’s life has been far from easy, and her story has been turned into a bio-series by Imagen Televisión.

credit Instagram @paquitaoficialb

Paquita is an idol for many Latino women who were touched by her words. But her life wasn’t always so glamorous. The singer’s life has already been immortalized in a bio-series broadcasted by Imagen Televisión. Through the series, we found out that she married a 42-year-old man when she was just fifteen. She had two children with him only to find out that the ‘rata de dos patas’ had been cheating on him all along and had another family in a different town. Her love life has clearly not been as successful as her career —which is true of a lot of women in many different industries. The singer, however, is now an artist consolidated as one of the most famous feminist performers Mexico has ever seen. 

Selena Quintanilla’s Family Decided That ‘Fiesta De La Flor’ Will No Longer Take Place In Corpus Christi, Where Is It Moving To Next?

Entertainment

Selena Quintanilla’s Family Decided That ‘Fiesta De La Flor’ Will No Longer Take Place In Corpus Christi, Where Is It Moving To Next?

Even after her death, Selena Quintanilla’s music has lived on. The iconic Tex-Mex superstar left a legacy that is still very much alive. Her music is still being played on the radio and streamed online, her face is sold on T-shirts and other merch around the world, her story continues to inspire new TV and Movie projects. And yet, for some reason, the Quintanilla’s Fiesta de la Flor Festival —an annual music event in honor of Selena— isn’t being held at Selena’s hometown Corpus Christi, or at all.

The Quintanilla family announced that the yearly festival honoring Selena’s legacy will no longer be held in Corpus Christi.

credit Instagram @fiestaflorcc

Corpus Christi is synonymous with Selena Quintanilla. The coastal Texas city is where the singer lived and died, it’s also where her family continues to live to this day. In Corpus Christi, Selena fans can visit a museum dedicated entirely to the Queen of Tex-Mex. And for the past five years, the city had also been host to the family held festival, ‘Fiesta de la Flor’. The Quintanillas announced recently, however, that the festival will no longer take place in Corpus Christi. No word yet on where the festival might move to yet.

The news came in a media release from Q Productions.

Credit Instagram @abquintanilla

“Unfortunately, even beautiful journeys must come to an end. In Selena’s beautiful spirit, the Selena Foundation has contributed thousands of dollars to organizations in Corpus Christi for the betterment of the community. The Selena Foundation is committed to continuing Selena’s belief that the impossible is possible.” Much of the rest of the statement was dedicated to thanking a long list of organizations, including the Corpus Christi Convention and Visitors Bureau, for their support in the last five years.

No word yet on where the festival may land, if anywhere.

credit Instagram @fiestaflorcc

No further information was disclosed about where the festival might be taking place. Or whether it will happen at all. Why did they pull the plug from the Corpus Christi? Back in August, it was reported that the family had threatened to stop celebrating the festival in Corpus Christi because of money issues. It was speculated that the amount of money the city was generating from the festival was disproportionately larger than what the Selena Foundation was receiving. 

According to Corpus Christi Caller Times, this year, for the first time since the inception of the festival in 2015, Fiesta de la Flor did not bring in a profit. The festival generates an estimated “$10.8 million economic impact for the city every year,” yet the Selena Foundation has made less than $100,000 in the four years of the festival.

Corpus Christi Convention and Visitors Bureau CEO quit after being criticized for giving the Quintanillas a larger sum of money than what been agreed before.

credit Twitter @Kris6news

The Corpus Christi Convention and Visitors Bureau CEO Paulette Kluge said that the amount was unacceptable. She said that “the city is making millions of dollars.” Because the bureau is now taking $50,000 from the festival to the foundation, that concludes the festival has no profit to report for this year. “Everybody is benefiting except the Selena Foundation, and they said, ‘It is unacceptable, and if we don’t get something for the Selena Foundation, there will not be another Fiesta de la Flor,’ ” Kluge said, according to the Caller Times. “So I agreed to pay them $35,000 last year, which was all of our profits, and $50,000 moving forward.”

Paulette Kluge recently resigned to her post at the bureau after being criticized for changing the contract with the Quintanillas —raising the family’s profits for the upcoming festival by $15,000—  without input from other officials. Kluge had the legal power to rewrite a contract that she was instrumental in creating. But the CVB Board and City Council were not happy with the new terms. Kluge is credited with building a relationship with the Quintanillas which would later lead to the birth of Fiesta de La Flor.

The two-day festival celebrating the queen of Tejano, had been held in Selena’s hometown for 5 years.

credit Instagram @fiestaflorcc

The festival began in 2015 and has brought about $15 million in economic benefit to the city each year. Formerly sponsored by Citgo, the next festival had a new benefactor lined up. Hermann and Hermann, a law firm based out of Corpus Christi with offices in San Antonio and McAllen, signed on to be the 2020 sponsor.

Corpus Christi Caller Times reported that when reached for information, the Quintanilla family and Q Productions declined to comment. Which leaves us with many unresolved questions. There is no website for the foundation. A quick Google search showed a 2016 article in which it says that the foundation was formed to honor Selena’s legacy as well as give scholarships. However, the foundation has faced some tax issues in the past and is not considered a nonprofit.

And even though we don’t know for certain, why the family pulled the festival from Corpus Christi or when we’ll get to celebrate the Latina icon again, we will be looking forward to finding out where Fiesta de La Flor is going to next.