entertainment

Mexico Is Becoming A Major Source Of Talent And Production For Netflix

narcos / romacuaron / Instagram

Mexico has long been a source for original stories and great talent when it comes to film and television. The country has also long exported some of best minds behind the camera, five out of six of the last best director Oscars have gone to Mexican filmmakers Alfonos Cuarón, Alejando Iñárritu and Guillermo del Toro. That’s why it’s no surprise streaming giant Netflix is increasing production in Mexico with more than 50 projects in different stages of production over the next two years. With award-winning projects like “Roma” and fan favorite series like “Narcos: Mexico,” Netflix is just tapping into the emerging talent and stories that Mexico has to offer.

While there has been streaming services prior to offer Spanish content, none have the reach and audience like Netflix.

With the expansion and investment in Mexico, Netflix is ushering in a new era for filmmakers, actors and a global audience that will get to view the work. The incoming projects include five new projects, a musical inspired by the music of Pedro Infante, a series of documentaries about the U.S.-Mexico border executive produced by Gael García Bernal, American Jesus, based on a comic by Mark Millar and a anticipated series about Selena. The increase in production is noticeable. As of 2017, only seven Netflix productions were made in Mexico.

“The richness of talent in front of and behind the camera in Mexico was key in our decision to begin our local production strategy four years ago,” Netflix Chief Executive Ted Sarandos said at a publicity event in Mexico City last month.

Netlfix is planning to open a new office in Mexico City to help increase production there.

The expansion to film and produce in Mexico comes natural for Netflix. It was the place where it first started producing non-English original programming when it expanded internationally to Latin America in 2011.

The numbers also show that international expansion is the way to go for the streaming service. More than half of Netflix’s audience is now international, and international subscriptions are growing faster than domestically. In the last quarter of 2018, Netflix added 1.5 million U.S. subscribers and 7.3 million international subscribers — a record increase. Netflix executives declined to release the number of subscribers it currently has in Mexico.

It’s also benefited those living in Mexico by providing job opportunities.
Over 100,000 Mexicans have already worked on Netflix Originals and this will only increase in the coming years.

Lenard Liberman, the CEO of LBI Media, the parent company to Burbank-based, Spanish-language EstrellaTV Networks says the combination of Netflix and Mexico is good sign for consumers.

“The fact that you have a Netflix now and you have independent producers producing, it’s created more diversity and more interesting formats,”
Liberman told The Hollywood Reporter. “Where it used to just be novella novella novella, the fact that there are so many platforms now looking for great content means that there’s a lot of people being creative.

Netflix is giving Mexico a platform to tell it’s stories and give actors from the region a chance to be exposed to a huge audience.

What made productions like “Roma” and “Narcos: Mexico” so successful was the authenticity it provided viewers. Part of that authenticity comes from the on-site location filming that Mexico brings.

The focus on production in the country has also exposed millions to stories and actors who audiences might have never been to introduced to. Erik Barmack, who recently left Netflix to start his own production company after serving as the vice president for international originals, says no matter where the production is filmed or where a story comes from, audiences will always love great content.

“People from around the world are used to watching things subtitled and dubbed — they’re just looking for stories,” Barmack told the LA Times. “They’re not thinking, what’s coming from the U.S. They’re just asking, ‘How do I find the most interesting things from around the world?’”

READ: Once Again, A Study Shows Latinos Continue To Lack Representation In Hollywood

Here’s Your Reminder Of The Caesar Salad’s Mexican Roots

Culture

Here’s Your Reminder Of The Caesar Salad’s Mexican Roots

Taste.com

Those who don’t know any better give Mexican food a bad rap for being cheap and greasy. However, the Mexican culinary world expands far past Taco Bell and Taco Cabana. Authentic Mexican food is fresh, bold, delicious and versatile.

In fact, Mexico is responsible for one of the biggest fine dining staples there is.

Mexico is, in fact, the birthplace of the creamy and crisp Caesar salad.

Twitter / @oucrimsongirl

As the story goes, the Caesar salad was created in Tijuana, Mexico by an Italian restaurateur named Caesar Cardini. It was 1924 when Cardini established his restaurant in the tourist destination to cater to American guests escaping prohibition. While no one really knows the true story, most agree the salad was created over 4th of July holiday weekend.

Supposedly, the dish was completely improvised. Cardini is said to have thrown together several ingredients he had at his disposal and it created the fresh, delicious gourmet salad.

Twitter / @ladelandleaf

According to What’s Cooking America, the original recipe used a base of romain lettuce leafs. Additionally, garlic, parmesan cheese, croutons, boiled eggs, olive oil and Worcestershire sauce were added.

Rumor has it that it was Cardini’s brother, Alex, that added anchovies in 1926. He named his remix the “Aviator’s Salad.” Still, this anchovy-filled dish was so popular that it became known as the official Caesar salad.

Parts of this story is hard to prove, but it comes with a famous witness to offer some legitimacy to it.

Twitter / @keatonkildebell

The famous English chef, Julia Child, shared her first encounter with the iconic salad. In her book, “From Julia Child’s Kitchen,” the chef recounted her experience in a Tijuana restaurant. She wrote:

“My parents, of course, ordered the salad. Caesar himself rolled the big cart up to the table, tossed the romaine in a great wooden bowl, and I wish I could say I remembered his every move, but I don’t. They only thing I see again clearly is the eggs. I can see him break 2 eggs over that romaine and roll them in, the greens going all creamy as the eggs flowed over them. Two eggs in a salad? Two one-minute coddled eggs? And garlic-flavored croutons, and grated Parmesan cheese? It was a sensation of a salad from coast to coast, and there were even rumblings of its success in Europe.”

It’s popularity in Europe cause people to mistakenly think the Caesar salad is Italian.

Twitter / @Kylie_greenlee
Twitter / @2FlyT

However, the dish is 100% authentically Mexican cuisine. To recognize the delectable salad, in 1953, it was declared “the greatest recipe to originate from the Americas in 50 years” by the International Society of Epicure. We wouldn’t expect anything less from this Mexican classic.

Walmart Launches 24-Hour Delivery Service In Mexico, You Can Literally Text What You Want To Their WhatsApp Number

Things That Matter

Walmart Launches 24-Hour Delivery Service In Mexico, You Can Literally Text What You Want To Their WhatsApp Number

You may not give WhatsApp a second glance in the App Store, but in other countries, it’s the messaging app of choice.

It’s so big in Mexico, for instance, that Walmart Mexico is now accepting grocery delivery orders for its Superama supermarkets sent via the messaging app.

Walmart and WhatsApp team up to bring 24-hour home delivery to the masses.

Credit: @zyiteblog / Twitter

WhatsApp, the free text-messaging service owned by social media platform Facebook, is ubiquitous throughout Mexico. Superama shoppers can text an order to a WhatsApp number run by Walmart.

According to Walmart, customers can send their orders through WhatsApp to a number owned by Walmart – they don’t even have to type their list out. Many people have already tested the service and apparently, you can send the number a photo of a handwritten list and got a response from a representative immediately.

Yup, you can literally text the WhatsApp number a photo of your handwritten list.

Credit: @ChargedRetail / Twitter

Superama is charging about $2.55 for delivery within 90 minutes or $2 for orders with longer turnaround times. It also accepts payment in cash or card on delivery.

The Walmart-owned grocery chain, which makes up 92 of the retail giant’s 2,459 stores in Mexico, already takes orders through its website and app.

Clearly, though, it’s hoping that WhatsApp’s ubiquitous presence in the country will encourage more potential customers to give grocery delivery a shot.

And apparently, the representatives at the other end of that WhatsApp conversation are super helpful.

Credit: @dainabethcita / Twitter

Like who doesn’t want a response from Walmart full of emojis and helpful suggestions on buying the best of the best?! Everyone, that’s who!

Walmart already offers delivery through its own app, online, and via CornerShop.

Credit: @viajandoperdido / Twitter

But many are excited for the whole new market that this opens up and the novel use of an app that millions of people already use on a daily basis.

You could literally switch between a conversation with you tia about your novio and then chat with a representative at Walmart about which type of cereal you want delivered to your door.

Reactions across Twitter have been overwhelmingly positive.

Credit: @tridevgurung / Twitter

Many pointed out that people don’t have the smartphones required to run complicated apps – WhatsApp is a simple messaging service – meaning that mobile delivery service could be available to a wider audience.

READ: 20 Latino Brands That Are Clearly Superior To All Others

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