Entertainment

Mexico City Has Been Chosen To Host The First Ever Spotify Music Awards And We Can’t Wait

A lot of people in Mexico City use Spotify which is why it made sense for the company to launch their new annual awards show there. The inaugural event will take place on March 5, 2020. Unlike other music award shows, where a select group of members decides the winners, the platform will allow fans to dictate the victors using streaming data — and it appears to be centered around Mexico and Latin America. 

Having the awards show obviously will encourage users to stream their favorite artists more often but launching the show in Mexico City will cement the brand as one that can recognize the importance of musical audiences outside of the United States. The Spotify Awards will be aired live on TNT and will be aimed at Spanish-speakers in Latin America. 

Mexico City is a Spotify City.

Spotify released a video to promote the award show and it is entirely in Spanish and filmed in Mexico. 

“A multicultural mecca of nearly 22 million residents, the greater Mexico City metropolitan area is more populous than both the greater Los Angeles and greater New York City areas, respectively,” the streaming service declared.

According to Variety, Mexico City has the highest concentration of users in the world, more than any other city including New York, Paris, Chile, Santiago, and London. In 2018, Spotify declared the city the “streaming music capital” just five years after launching the service in Mexico. 

“Mexico City has evolved in a few short years from being Spotify’s first-ever Latin American market, in 2013, to our largest listener base worldwide today. Since we launched in Mexico City, Spotify has opened international artists’ eyes to this global music epicenter as a place to expand their reach and connect with new audiences,” Spotify said 2018. 

Artists appear to be flocking to Mexico City because they know they have a solid fanbase there.

The brand seems certain that Mexico City a trendsetting cultural mecca. It noted that the diverse population and their tastes made the city an epicenter for both established and new artists. The company noted the headliners for the 2018 Corona Capital music festival, like Imagine Dragons, Robbie Williams, and Nine Inch Nails, had their music streamed the most in Mexico City. 

The devotion of chilangos, seems to be pulling in aspiring artists to the city to broaden their audience. 

“We’re seeing a wave of touring artists, like genre-bending singer-songwriter Mon Laferte from Chile and alt-rock band Diamante Eléctrico from Colombia, flock to Mexico City to connect with fans and make their mark,” Spotify said. 

Users don’t just decide the awards, they decide the categories.

Spotify has 248 million users worldwide, and the fate of their inaugural award show depends on them. At the Spotify Awards, user-generated data will determine the finalists, winners and the categories. 

“Thanks to streaming and the true audience size of Mexico, users are in the front seat like never before. We decided to celebrate this by recognizing what users love based entirely on their listening. The Spotify Awards is all about this, giving everyone an opportunity to be part of the show,“ Mia Nygren, Spotify’s Managing Director for Latin America, said in a statement. 

It will be interesting to see how this all plays out considering Latinx artists have been dominating streaming services for the last few years and Spotify included some of those genres in their press release. 

“That’s right: your streaming choices — whether hip-hop or rock, reggaeton, band, or cumbia — matter,” they wrote.  “Your plays, patterns, and habits will help determine the award categories, finalists, and winners, for the Spotify Awards by providing a true reflection of what fans are listening to.”

This could mean far more interesting categories that just “Best Rock” or “Best Rap” — Latinx streamers could possibly be establishing more diverse awards categories like “Best Reggaeton” or “Best Cumbia,” with their listening habits alone. Moreover, the show is airing in Spanish which has to mean that the Spotify Awards are going to look a whole lot different than the 2020 Grammy Awards, and perhaps even the 2019 Latin Grammy Awards, where many reggaeton artists felt snubbed. We’ll just have to find out on March 5. 

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Selena Gomez Releases New Spanish-Language Single ‘De Una Vez’ and Teases Full Spanish Album: ‘I’m Targeting My Heritage’

Entertainment

Selena Gomez Releases New Spanish-Language Single ‘De Una Vez’ and Teases Full Spanish Album: ‘I’m Targeting My Heritage’

Photo via selenagomez/Instagram

Good news, Selenators! Word on the street is that Selena Gomez will soon be dropping her first-ever Spanish language album. The rumors started after Gomez dropped a surprising (and beautiful!) new Spanish-language single, “De Una Vez”.

Soon after the single dropped, rumors of a full Spanish-language studio album began to swirl when murals promoting “De Una Vez” and a yet-unreleased single “Baila Conmigo” popped up across, Mexico.

To make matters even better, Selena already dropped “De Una Vez”‘s music video.

The lush and imaginative video has been garnering praise for its inclusion of Latin American visuals and symbols. Gomez hired Tania Verduzco and Adrian Perez to direct her video–a husband and wife team who hail from Mexico and Spain, respectively and go by the moniker Los Pérez.

Of hiring Spanish speakers to direct her video, Gomez revealed to Vogue online that the decision was intentional. “If I was going to completely immerse myself into a project inspired by Latin culture, I wanted to work with native Spanish speaking creators,” she said.

And indeed, Verduzco and Perez tried to infuse as much Latin spirit into the video’s conception as possible.

“Magical realism has always been part of the Latin culture, whether it be in art or telenovelas,” Gomez told Vogue. “I wanted [to capture] that sense of a supernatural world.”

They accomplished this sense of magical realism by utilizing motifs from Mexican folk art, like Milagro, which is symbolized by the glowing heart that is beating within Gomez’s chest throughout the video.

“We wanted to play with powerful language and images. We designed the heart—we call it the Milagro in Mexican culture—and its light to be a metaphor for the healing throughout the story,” Verduzco told Vogue.

Selena Gomez fans are especially excited about this project because Gomez has long hinted at her desire to release a Spanish-language album.

Back in 2011, Gomez tweeted about her plans to eventually record an entire album in Spanish. “Can’t wait for y’all to hear the Spanish record;) it’s sounding so cool,” she wrote.

She retweeted the sentiment on Thursday with the comment: “I think it will be worth the wait”–which many fans took as confirmation that a full studio album is on its way.

It’s worth noting that Gomez has already dipped her toe into the Latin music scene with 2010’s “Un Año Sin Lluvia” and 2018’s DJ Snake, Ozuna and Cardi B collab, “Taki Taki”.

As for the difficulty of recording songs in a second language, Gomez said that it was a practice that came naturally.

“I actually think I sing better in Spanish. That was something I discovered,” she said in an interview for Apple Music. “It was a lot of work, and look, you cannot mispronounce anything. It is something that needed to be precise, and needed to be respected by the audience I’m going to release this for.”

She continued: “Of course I want everyone to enjoy the music, but I am targeting my fan base. I’m targeting my heritage, and I couldn’t be more excited.”

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The Mexico City House From Netflix’s “Roma” Is Up For Sale And Could Be Yours For The Right Price

Entertainment

The Mexico City House From Netflix’s “Roma” Is Up For Sale And Could Be Yours For The Right Price

Rodrigo Arangua / Getty Images

Every so often the locations filmed in some of our favorite movies become famous in their own right. Think about the dinosaurs from Peewee’s Big Adventure, the Circus Liquor store from Clueless, or the San Francisco mansion from Full House, close your eyes and you can probably picture them crystal clear.

For the Netflix film Roma, one of its biggest stars has been the house in which many of the film’s scenes were shot. In fact, it’s become a bit of a tourist destination in its own right. And now, as it comes on the market, people are flocking to the property for a chance to see it up close.

The house from Roma is on sale and people are flocking to see it.

Besides being a chronicle of a family during a turbulent moment in history and conveying a complex look at class and gender, Alfonso Cuarón’s award-winning Roma is also that rare film where its primary location feels like a character unto itself. In this case, it’s the Mexico City house where the film’s characters live; over the course of watching, you might feel like you live there yourself.

Now, the house in question is on the market — and cinema buffs and architecture fans alike might be intrigued.

The now famous house doesn’t really standout among the neighboring homes – except for a commemorative plaque.

Credit: Rodrigo Arangua/ Getty Images

Although the house is located in one of the city’s most popular neighborhoods – Roma – it’s located in a quiet corner of the colonia and doesn’t really stand out from any of the other houses. Although upon further inspection, you’ll see a plaque that commemorates the most celebrated Mexican film in decades, Roma.

In the 2018 film, Tepeji 22 stood in for Alfonso Cuarón’s boyhood home, and its facade and patio featured in some of the most memorable scenes.

Cuarón spent the first years of his life in the house across the street, Tepeji 21, but preferred the light in the house opposite to shoot his film and the family agreed. The production designer, Eugenio Caballero, changed the window grilles and retiled the patio, which serves as the set piece for the film’s first scene introducing the film’s protagonist, Cleo, the family’s maid, as she washes dog waste from the floor with soapy water.

The home was painstakingly recreated a set to match Cuarón’s memories.

Credit: Carlos Somante / Roma / Netflix

In a Netflix documentary about the making of the film, Cuáron describes how he tried to find as much of the original furniture as he could, contacting relatives across Mexico to ask them to borrow pieces. And it worked, since so many people who saw the film spoke about its authenticity and beauty.

The home’s owners have put it up for sale but aren’t publicly disclosing the price.

When Roma was nominated for 10 Oscars – and won three, including one for Best Director – the Monreal family (who own the property) welcomed tourists who tracked the movie’s locations through Roma and the rest of the city.

“It hurts,” Monreal told The Guardian, of the decision to sell the house, preferring to keep the reasons for the sale private. “It has given us great satisfaction, we love it. You can’t measure everything that we have lived through here, everything this house has given us: shelter, closeness, a united family.”

Despite the rumors that are swirling across social media, the Monreal family has not publicly shared the asking price for the house. A listing for a four-bedroom house on the same street, which is only two blocks long and not much changed since the 1970s, cited an asking price of about US$760,000.

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