Entertainment

Fans Of ‘Mexican Dynasties’ Can’t Stop Talking About Raquel Calling A Child Ugly To His Face

Bravo is at it again with a new reality show that people can’t stop talking about. “Mexican Dynasties” is only two episodes in and people can’t get enough of the personalities who are making the show everything people want to watch. Some people just can’t get enough of the show and the cast of characters while others just can’t get over the casting of those representing Mexico. Here’s a quick glimpse into what people have to say about the show.

“Mexican Dynasties” is the newest reality show to hit the Bravo airwaves.

If you think it feels a lit like Netflix’s failed attempt at a Mexican reality show, you’re right. Bravo’s “Mexican Dynasties” is giving viewers a chance to check out the lives of some of Mexico’s rich and famous. It has all of the drama, over-inflated egos, and WTF moments people have come to expect from Bravo’s long list of over-the-top reality shows.

The latest moment on everyone’s lips is that of Raquel Bessudo calling a child ugly.

Bessudo was joining brother and sister Oscar and Paulina Madrazo for some food and games. Oscar already had a bone to pick with Bessudo because she kept saying that Oscar’s children, which were born via a surrogate, were adopted because he is gay. Even though they managed to patch that moment up between the two of them, Bessudo happened to put her foot back in her mouth.

While Bessudo was meeting Oscar’s children again, Paulina’s son, Nicolás, also came out to the dining room to meet Bessudo. Upon seeing the child, Bessudo said, “¿Es el feo, verdad?” (“He’s the ugly one, right?”) The comment obviously impacted Nicolás who went to a room and began to cry because she called him ugly.

Latino viewers immediately came to Bessudo’s defense.

Credit: @CM12_ / Twitter

Many of us in the Latino community have grown up hearing certain words used in loving ways. For example, some times your parents or grandparents calling you gordito or gordita was done with love and not any mal-intent. Clearly, that is a generational thing since many of younger Latinos don’t typically use these terms for their loved ones.

Yet, some viewers are making Bessudo an enemy because of how she made the child feel.

Credit: @BravoLove12 / Twitter

Obviously, you shouldn’t be calling children ugly. The real surprise was how the rest of the people in the room just let it slide by without a so much as a shrug. It has a feeling of colorism because Bessudo couldn’t stop doting over Oscar’s fair-skinned and light-haired children. Paulina’s son, “the ugly one” has noticeably darker skin and hair.

This underlying sentiment is exacerbated because of the hostility white Mexicans have shown to “Roma” star Yalitza Aparicio. The disparaging comments made about Aparicio since the release of “Roma” has ignited a discussion about colorism in Mexico placing indigenous people at the forefront of the conversation.

Oscar tried to comfort Nicolás by letting him know that Bessudo didn’t mean that he was actually ugly.

Credit: @briitt23_ / Twitter

“I love kids and kids love me,” Bessudo told the camera in her confessional.

Oscar then leads the kids to their room and that’s when Nicolás breaks down crying.

Nicolás: “She said that I’m ugly!”

Oscar: “What?”

Nicolás: “When I said hi to her, she said, ‘You are the ugly one.'”

Oscar: “Wait, wait, wait. How did she say it?”

Nicolás: “She said, ‘Oh, you’re the ugly one’ right when I walked by her.”

Oscar: “Nico, that’s a way of saying you’re so beautiful, you know? ‘Ay, ya llego el feo. Oh, here’s the ugly one. Oh, you’re the ugly one.’ Meaning that all of you are stunning and beautiful.”

Nicolás: “Why would she say that?”

Oscar: “Trust me. She didn’t say it in a bad way.”

When asked by the producers why she called Nicolás ugly, her response left some viewers stunned.

Credit: @Becktul / Twitter

She straight up acted like she didn’t know who she called ugly.

Producer: “Why did you call Nico ‘the ugly one?'”

Bessudo: “Who is Nico?”

Aside from that moment, people are torn about the representation of the show.

Credit: @kat617919 / Twitter

Much like the criticism lodged against Netflix’s “Made In Mexico,” people are disappointed at the lack of color represented in the show. The main cast is predominately white Mexicans with blond hair and fair skin and many think it is giving a whitewashed representation of the country.

It is turning some viewers off from the start of the show.

Credit: @AlexandriaEliz7 / Twitter

Others have made the argument that people of all different skin tones call Mexico home. That is true but people are exhausted with the perpetuating narrative that darker skinned Latinos are always the help.

The clear winners of “Mexican Dynasties” are the housekeepers who keep things real.

They are not holding back with their commentary during the show. They are literally saying everything that everyone watching the show is already thinking. They make the show so much more bearable for everyone watching.

What do you think about “Mexican Dynasties”? Are you watching the show or are you just checking Twitter for all the chisme about the cast?

READ: Here Are Some Reality Stars Who Are A Better Follow Than Kim Kardashian

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Sasha Calle Is Officially The DC Universe’s First-Ever Latina Supergirl

Entertainment

Sasha Calle Is Officially The DC Universe’s First-Ever Latina Supergirl

The DC Universe just got a heck of a lot more Brown.

This week, it was announced that 25-year-old actress Sasha Calle is poised to be the franchise’s newest superstar. Known for portraying Lola Rosales on “The Young and the Restless,” the actress will take on the role of Supergirl in the DC film franchise.

Her first appearance as Supergirl expected to debut in the upcoming movie “The Flash.”

Calle, who is of Colombian heritage, is set to become the first Latina ever to play the role of Supergirl.

Calle earned her first breakout role in 2018 after being cast in the long-running CBS daytime drama “The Young & The Restless” as a food truck owner and the youngest sister of brothers in the midst of a toxic rivalry.

Calle earned a Daytime Emmy nomination in the Outstanding Young Performer in a Drama Series category last year for her part in the series.

“On behalf of everyone at ‘The Young and the Restless,’ we’d like to congratulate Sasha Calle on making history and being chosen to play the first Latina Supergirl,” the daytime drama’s executive producer Anthony Morina and co-executive producer/head writer Josh Griffith shared in a statement. “The role of Supergirl is a perfect fit for someone of Sasha’s immense talent, and we wish her all the best as she takes on this groundbreaking role.”

According to Deadline, Calle beat out 425 actresses for the part of Supergirl.

Andy Muschietti director of The Flash gave Calle the good news about her role over Zoom.

“Can I freak out for a second?” Calle asked before announcing the news to someone offscreen. “I got it,” she said to the person off-camera while doing a dance in her chair. Turning back to Muschietti, Calle admitted “I’m probably not going to stop crying all day.”

Calle shared the moment to her Instagram admitting she was still processing the big news.

“A Latina superhero?!” Calle wrote of the news in Spanish. “On what planet?! Well, on this planet! What joy and what pride.” Thanking her mom, Calle wrote, “I adore you with everything I have. You are an example of a superhero.”

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This Teacher Received A Nissan Pickup Truck Decked Out As A Mobile Classroom

Things That Matter

This Teacher Received A Nissan Pickup Truck Decked Out As A Mobile Classroom

Like students around the world, kids in Mexico have been forced to take school online or tune into programming on public TV in order to learn. But that’s just the kids who are lucky enough to have access to Internet or a TV. Many students live in rural areas and lack the adequate resources to continue their studies amid the global pandemic.

But thankfully, there are many good samaritans out there (aka compassionate teachers) who have invented their own ways to bring the classroom to kids wherever they are.

A Mexican teacher was gifted a decked out pickup truck by Nissan.

Since schools were forced to close last year in April, Aguascalientes special education teacher Nallely Esparza Flores, has been driving four hours a day to educate students one-on-one at their homes from her truck bed, outfitted with a small table and chairs.

News of her project spread across social media, eventually reaching the corporate offices of Nissan México. This week, the company surprised Esparza with the gift of a new pickup truck specially outfitted with a small open-air mobile classroom built into the truck’s bed.

“Today I feel like my labors and the help that we give each day to children and their families is unstoppable,” she said on Twitter Wednesday, sharing photos of her new vehicle. “My students no longer have to take classes in the full heat of the sun,” she said.

Nissan representatives said they decided to give Esparza the adapted NP300 model, 4-cylinder truck after hearing her story because she was “an example of perseverance and empathy.”

“When we learned about the incredible work of this teacher, we got together to discuss in what way we could contribute to this noble work,” said Armando Ávila, a vice president of manufacturing.

The mobile classroom is pretty legit and will allow Esparza to continue her good deed.

Esparza inside her new classroom.

The decked out Nissan pickup truck has three walls (the other is a retractable sheeting) and a ceiling made with translucent panels to protect teacher and student from the elements while letting in natural light.

It also has retractable steps for easy access to the classroom, electrical connections, a whiteboard and an easily disinfected acrylic table and benches that are foldable into the wall to provide space. The table also has a built-in plexiglass barrier to allow social distancing.

Access to education in Mexico is highly inequitable.

Esparza, like many teachers across the country, found that not all distance learning was equal. Many of her students in Cavillo were from poor families without internet access. So she used social media networks to keep in touch with such students via cell phones, but even that was not necessarily an available option for all — and not ideal. Finally, she decided to solve the problem by hitting the road in her pickup truck.

According to the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), only 58% of students in Mexico had a home computer – the lowest percentage among all OECD countries. And only about one third (32%) of the school computers in rural schools in Mexico were connected to
the Internet, compared to more than 90% for schools located in urban areas.

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