Entertainment

This Mariachi Version Of Grease’s ‘Hopelessly Devoted To You’ Will Make You Want A Latino ‘Grease’

Hopelessly Devoted To You – Mariachi Cover – MES

What’s up Grease fans!!!! We have come a long way since making our first recordings and I have learned a lot about this whole process. Hope you all enjoy our re recorded version of Hopelessly Devoted To You from the motion picture Grease.

Posted by Mariachi Entertainment System on Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Mariachi Entertainment System is nailing one cover after another.

Mariachi Entertainment System (MES) started with the objective to create mariachi covers of video game songs but that has quickly evolved. To date, MES has created covers of music from “The Nightmare Before Christmas,” “Legend Of Zelda,” and, now, “Grease.” Their musical renditions of some of the most known songs garnered the group much attention with more than 29,000 subscribers to their YouTube channel. Though they have strayed from the video game music idea they originally had, people aren’t mad that the band is giving “Hopelessly Devoted To You” the mariachi makeover.

Some people are calling the remake of the song better than the original.

Mariachi Entertainment System / Facebook

If only “Grease” would have been a Mexican production. Imagine the soundtrack that project would have created.

Their videos and choice of songs is earning them some dedicated fans.

Mariachi Entertainment System / Facebook

We all know that adding Latino flare to anything will always make it better.

They even have fans asking for them to release a full album.

Mariachi Entertainment System / Facebook

So, let us know.

You can watch the original “Grease” version of the song below.

Just about any big event hosted by Latinxs is bound to have three things: delicious food, drinks to get the party going, and some great tunes. Mariachi performances are especially a party favorite. In fact, they can be found at all kinds of events such as quinceañeras, festivals and even funerals. While the genre has been popular in Mexico since the 18th century, we’ve started to see women make their mark on Mariachi music. These mujeres bring beauty, talent, stage presence and innovation to a genre of music that often excluded them. As a matter of fact, they’re proving that Mariachi is a girl’s game.

Here are some more badass all-mujer Mariachi bands that put your tio’s old favs to shame.

1. Mariachi Margaritas

@mariachimargaritas / Instagram

These Brownsville beauties are spreading their brand of Mariachi music all across South Texas. While they’ve toured through the Rio Grande Valley area, Mariachi Margaritas has also dipped down into Guadalajara, Mexico. During that time, they played alongside Mexican celebrities Pedro Fernandez, Pablo Montero and Flor Amargo.

2. Flor de Toloache

@flordetoloache / Instagram

Back in 2008, Flor de Toloache made history as New York City’s first all-female mariachi group. This group’s members embody the diversity of the Latinidad; hailing from Germany, the United States, Puerto Rico, Mexico, Columbia, Cuba, Italy and Australia. Not to mention, Flor de Toloache even won a Latin Grammy in 2017 for their Ranchero album “Las Caras Lindas.”

3. Mariachi Las Catrinas

@mariachilascatrinas / Instagram

Located in Los Angeles, this Mariachi band is committed to bringing fun and musica to the masses. Their brand of Mariachi has enabled the band to toured all over California. Additionally, Las Catrinas have preformed many times across Mexico.

4. Mariachi Las Adelitas

@mariachilasadelitas / Instagram

Located in London, Mariachi Las Adelitas proves that the Latinidad truly is international. Having toured all over the world, this band has played for the Mexican and U.S. Embassies in the UK, IKEA, the British Museum, and Disney.

5. Mariachi Mujer Latina

@mariachimujerlatina / Instagram

This Mariachi band from Guadalajara has performed throughout North America from Vancouver to California to all over Mexico. In fact, Mujer Latina even performed on live television and have appeared on “Luján en Vivo” and “Cantares y Costumbres.”

6. Mariachi Rosas Divinas

@rosasdivinas / Instagram

Mariachi Rosas Divinas was founded in 2004 as Dallas’s first and only all-woman Mariachi band. While they’ve played all over Texas, their brand of musica has taken them across the states from Chicago, Michigan, Oklahoma and Louisiana.

7. Las Colibrí

@lascolibri / Instagram

Inspired by the iconic beauties of 40s and 50s Mexican cinema, these Hummingbirds have a stylish flare all their own. Like traditional early 20th century Mariachi, Las Colibrí similarly features an all-string instrumental arrangement.

8. Mariachi Pasión

@mariachipasion / Instagram

Mariachi Pasión started in a music class at Arizona State University in 2002. Their first gig was a performance for a member’s relative. However, they’ve come a long way; playing for former Mexican President Vicente Fox, George Lopez, Edward James Olmos and the Phoenix Suns.

9. Veronica Robles’ Female Mariachi

@veronicaroblesmariachi / Instagram

Veronica Robles started Boston’s first all-mujer Mariachi band in 2000. Widely recognized by music authorities as the most authentic representation of Mexican music in New England, Robles is know by fans as La Mera or The Real One. Moreover, her assembled band is made up of extremely talented women from around the world.

10. Mariachi Las Alteñas

@mariachilasaltenas / Instagram

This Tejana group was founded in 2002 in San Antonio, a positively city rich in Mexican culture and arts. While Las Alteñas preform their songs, they also interpret them for their audiences using elaborate choreography.

11. La Victoria

@music.la.victoria / Instagram

La Victoria is a trio of L.A. Chicanas who blend Mariachi traditions and contemporary life into their music. Created with their violin, guitar and guitarrón, this music embodies the a simple but powerful approach to Mariachi music.

12. Mariachi Guerrera Quetzalli

@guerreraquetzalli / Instagram

Texas’ Mariachi Guerrera Quetzalli is a ten mujer-strong San Antonio Mariachi band. Additionally to providing beautiful music for their fans, their goal is to empower women in the genre of Mariachi music.


Read: Mandy Gonzalez and Lin-Manuel Miranda Pair Up With Broadway Stars To Make Charity Record for Separated Families

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This Artist Has Been Breaking Barriers As A Non-Traditional Mariachi

Entertainment

This Artist Has Been Breaking Barriers As A Non-Traditional Mariachi

On a recent episode of ABC’s game show To Tell The Truth, three celebrity panelists were tasked to uncover the identity of a real mariachi singer.

Each contender embodied “non-traditional” attributes of mariachi culture either through physical appearance or language barriers, leaving the panelists stumped.

When it came time for the big reveal, with a humble smile 53-year-old Timoteo “El Charro Negro” stood up wowing everyone. Marveled by his talents, Timoteo was asked to perform unveiling his smooth baritone voice.

While not a household name in the U.S., his career spans over 25 years thriving on the catharsis of music.

Timoteo “El Charro Negro” performing “Chiquilla Linda” on Dante Night Show in 2017.

Originally from Dallas, Texas, Timoteo, born Timothy Pollard, moved to Long Beach, California with his family when he was eight years old. The move to California exposed Pollard to Latin culture, as the only Black family in a Mexican neighborhood.

As a child, he recalled watching Cantinflas because he reminded him of comedian Jerry Lewis, but musically he “got exposed to the legends by chance.”

“I was bombarded by all the 1960s, ’70s, and ’50s ranchera music,” Timoteo recalls to mitú.

The unequivocal passion mariachi artists like Javier Solis and Vicente Fernandez possessed heavily resonated with him.

“[The neighbors] always played nostalgic music, oldies but goodies, and that’s one thing I noticed about Mexicans,” Timoteo says. “They can be in their 20s but because they’ve grown up listening to the oldies it’s still very dear to them. That’s how they party.”

For as long as he can remember, Pollard “was born with the genetic disposition to love music,” knowing that his future would align with the arts.

After hearing Vicente Fernandez sing “Lástima Que Seas Ajena,” an awakening occurred in Pollard. While genres like hip-hop and rap were on the rise, Pollard’s passion for ranchera music grew. It was a moment when he realized that this genre best suited his big voice.

Enamored, Pollard began to pursue a career as a Spanish-language vocalist.

El Charro Negro
Photo courtesy of Timothy Pollard.

At 28, Timoteo began learning Spanish by listening and singing along to those artists he adored in his youth.

“When I decided that I wanted to be a mariachi, I didn’t think it was fair to exploit the culture and not understand the language,” he says. “If I’m going to sing, I need to be able to communicate with my audience and engage with them. I need to understand what I’m saying because it was about honor and respect.”

Pollard began performing local gigs after picking up the language in a matter of months. He soon attracted the attention of “Big Boy” Radio that adorned him the name Timoteo “El Charro Negro.”

Embellishing his sound to highlight his Black heritage, Pollard included African instruments like congas and bongos in his orchestra. Faintly putting his own spin on a niche genre, Pollard avoided over-saturating the genre’s sound early in his career.

Embraced by his community as a beloved mariachi, “El Charro Negro” still encountered race-related obstacles as a Black man in the genre.

“There are those [in the industry] who are not in the least bit thrilled to this day. They won’t answer my phone calls, my emails, my text messages I’ve sent,” he says. “The public at large hasn’t a problem with it, but a lot of the time it’s those at the helm of decision making who want to keep [the genre] exclusively Mexican.”

“El Charro Negro” persisted, slowly attracting fans worldwide while promoting a message of harmony through his music.

In 2007, 12 years into his career, Pollard received a golden ticket opportunity.

El Charro Negro
Pollard (left) seen with legendary Mexican artist Vicente Fernandez (right) in 2007. Photo courtesy of Timothy Pollard.

In a by-chance encounter with a stagehand working on Fernandez’s tour, Pollard was offered the chance to perform onstage. The singer was skeptical that the offer was legit. After all, what are the chances?

The next day Pollard went to his day job at the time and said, “a voice in my head, which I believe was God said, ‘wear your blue velvet traje tonight.'”

That evening Pollard went to a sold-out Stockton Area where he met his idol. As he walked on the stage, Pollard recalls Fernandez insisting that he use his personal mic and band to perform “De Que Manera Te Olvido.”

“[Fernandez] said he did not even want to join me,” he recollects about the show. “He just was kind and generous enough to let me sing that song on his stage with his audience.”

The crowd applauded thunderously, which for Pollard was a sign of good things to come.

El Charro Negro
Timoteo “El Charro Negro” with Don Francisco on Don Francisco Presenta in 2011. Photo courtesy of Timothy Pollard.

In 2010, he released his debut album “Me Regalo Contigo.” In perfect Spanish, Pollard sings with great conviction replicating the soft tones of old-school boleros.

Unraveling the rollercoaster of relationships, heart-wrenchingly beautiful ballads like “Me Regalo Contigo” and “Celos” are his most streamed songs. One hidden gem that has caught the listener’s attention is “El Medio Morir.”

As soon as the track begins it is unlike the others. Timoteo delivers a ’90s R&B love ballad in Spanish, singing with gumption as his riffs and belts encapsulate his unique sound and story.

Having appeared on shows like Sabado Gigante, Don Francisco Presenta, and Caso Cerrado in 2011, Timoteo’s career prospered.

Timoteo hasn’t released an album since 2010 but he keeps his passion alive. The singer has continued to perform, even during the Covid pandemic. He has high hopes for future success and original releases, choosing to not slow down from his destined musical journey.

“If God is with me, who can be against me? It may not happen in a quick period of time, but God will make my enemies my footstool,” he said.

“I’ve continued to be successful and do some of the things I want to do; maybe not in a particular way or in particular events, but I live in a very happy and fulfilled existence.”

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Organizers Hire Mariachis To Play In Front of Ted Cruz’s House After Fallout From Cancun Vacation

Things That Matter

Organizers Hire Mariachis To Play In Front of Ted Cruz’s House After Fallout From Cancun Vacation

Photo via JackTheRiot/Twitter

You know the old saying: “If Ted Cruz can’t go to Mexico, bring Mexico to Ted Cruz.” At least we think that’s how the saying goes.

After catching major blowback from both sides of the aisle for going on vacation when his state was in crisis, some Texans don’t feel like accepting Sen. Cruz’s apology.

On Sunday, a Texas man hired a mariachi band to play in front of Ted Cruz’s house.

A crowd of Cruz’s neighbors gathered around the band while they played beautiful traditional mariachi songs. A group of protestors stood in front of the band, holding up signs that read “Cruz’s lives cost lives” and “Smash fascism!”

As a recap, Ted Cruz drew the ire of the entire country when he left a snow-drenched Texas to vacation in Mexico while his constituents were dying. According to reports, an estimated 32 Texans have died due to the freezing temperatures and continuous power outages in the state.

Once his trip went public, Cruz quickly returned home and placed the blame on his school-age daughters.

“It’s unfortunate, the fire storm that came from it. It was not my intention,” he told ABC13. “In saying yes to my daughters to somehow diminish all the Texans that were going through real hardship.”

Later, texts between Cruz’s wife and their neighbors were leaked. The texts showed his wife, Heidi Cruz, describing their house as “FREEZING” and asking the group if anyone was up for an impromptu trip to Cancun. She proposed they all stay at the Ritz-Carlton.

The man that organized the protest, Bryan Hlavinka, tweeted out a video of the protest with the caption: “There was a little fiesta in front of la casa de @tedcruz today.”

He posted another video of the band arriving at Senator Cruz’s house. “Just a typical Sunday. Mariachi band in tow,” said Hlavinka. “On our way to Ted Cruz’s house because he feels so bad about missing his vacation.”

Another similar page raising money for a Thursday mariachi visit to Ted Cruz’s house was also recently posted on GoFundMe. The description of the fundraiser is not without its fair share of sarcasm.

“Senator Cruz, being an amazing dad, dropped off his family in Cancun in the middle of a major crisis and came back to Texas to continue serving his constituents,” wrote the page’s organizer, Adam Jama. “We want to thank Senator Cruz for his leadership and pay for an amazing Mariachi band to perform for him. No one should go to Cancun and not listen to Mariachi.”

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