Entertainment

We Need To Talk About The Instagram Comments J Balvin And Maluma Leave Each Other

Platonic and honest friendships between dudes can be so cute and downright awesome. The Urban Dictionary, the pinnacle of internet wisdom, defines “bromance” as “the complicated love and affection shared by two straight males.” We have our issues with the restrictive nature of this definition, but OK, we’ll go with it. The entertainment industry is full of relationships marked by “complicated love and affection.” Can we think about Ben Affleck without Matt Damon? Or our own Latino superstars Gael García Bernal without the other great Mexican actor of his generation, Diego Luna? (we mean, just look at them… the definition of Latino bromance right there). 

Well, a recent bromance in the music scene has sparked the imagination of millions. Colombian reggaeton powerhouses J Balvin (his full telenovela name is José Álvaro Osorio Balvín) and Maluma (nombre de culebrón: Juan Luis Londoño Arias) share a close bond. It is a true bromance that strips away any sense of competition between the two artists. Perhaps, because they share the same Colombian background and deep passion for music, J Balvin and Maluma have struck a friendship despite having a significant age difference of nine years. J Balvin was born in 1985 and Maluma in 1994. Perhaps Maluma finds in J Balvin a mentor, someone who is slightly more experienced in life and the many ups and downs of fame. The media has often played out a sort of rivalry between the kings of reggaeton, but these are only ill-founded rumors. Fact is, these two dudes love each other. 

These are some of the things we love about this pair and why we hope que su amistad sea rica, honesta y duradera. Enter the frase célebre of our dear Laura Quiñones from the legendary Carrusel, but with a twist: “ay, qué bromántico.”

They are both proud children of the city of Medellín and it shows.

Credit: maluma / Instagram

J Balvin and Maluma are the faces of contemporary Colombia, and, just like Shakira a few years ago, they have helped wash away the harmful stereotypes that still subsist in popular culture. More so, they were both born and raised in the city of Medellín, which in the 1980s and 1990s became the infamous epicenter of the drug trade. J Balvin and Maluma are the perfect poster boys for the post-Escobar Medellín: creative, energetic and stepping firmly into the future. In one of the handful of photos together they have posted on social media, Maluma wrote: “Medellin pal mundo cucho!! Medellin tiene mucha luz para dar!!” (From Medellin to the world!! Medellin has a lot of light to give!!). Great artists go back to their roots. 

They both built their careers from the ground up, as second acts to legends like Daddy Yankee.

Credit: daddy-yankee-maluma-j-balvin. Digital Image. Telemundo.com

This photo was taken in Mexico City in 2016 when Maluma’s and J Balvin’s stars were just aligning and they were crossing over to international stardom outside of the Spanish-speaking market. This photo is a true delight: the past and present of a genre that has defined Latino music today. Who could have guessed they’d be such major artists today.

Igual de excéntricos, they are both equally quirky.

Credit: maluma / jbalvin / Instagram

Both artists have created enigmatic personas that redefine Latin American masculinity. Going against traditional macho stereotypes, both take care of their appearance and choose styles that shine, form the clothes down to their often unique haircuts. They are more Lady Gaga than Daddy Yankee, and we say this in the best possible way.

They believe in musical collaboration and admire each other.

Credit: maluma / Instagram

Look at those big smiles: not an ounce of professional jealousy. They have both praised each other’s musical prowess and have hinted at a possible further collaboration, which would be like the Super Bowl and the Oscars together for reggaeton fans worldwide. 

In fact, they are now teasing at an imminent full-on collaboration! They celebrated J Balvin’s cumple and increased our thirst in the process.

Credit: maluma / Instagram

This is not a drill, we repeat, this is not a drill… this is what Maluma posted just a week ago to celebrate his amigacho‘s birthday. “We will soon bring something”, he writes. Se nos cuecen las habas to know what these two are plotting. They are playful… but come on, don’t play with us!

This teasing is just making us crazy, but they love it and we are sure they are having tons of fun a nuestras expensas!

Credit: maluma / Instagram

We love how happy they always look together, smiling and living the high life. Here, Maluma is like “So what up, shall we release something together?”. 

They are not afraid to also tease each other on social media.

Credit: maluma / Instagram

One of the ways in which the singers slay notions of conservative Latino masculinity is by calling out each other on their good looks. This is not common for two openly straight dudes, particularly in Latin America, and sensationalist media looks for a few dollars publishing rumors who are unfounded and insulting to the queer community. It is the twentieth-first century, people! 

Will the wait finally be over? We would love this bromance even more.

Credit: maluma / Instagram

According to E! Latino, the singers met on April  2018 and their first collaboration, a remix of “X”, the song made famous by Nicky Jam and J Balvin, now Maluma and Ozuna, was released on June 29 of that same year. We would love this pair to collaborate much further, perhaps writing something together.

Se llevan pesado, pero se aguantan, like all good brothers from another mother.

Credit: reggaetoncolombiano / Instagram

In a video posted in February this year by the artists from the Colombian capital city Bogota, which might signal that they secretly wrote new material together, J Balvin mocks Maluma’s new haircut. He says: “Por fin se cortó el pelo, ya lo pueden presentar en la casa” (“He finally cut off his hair, you can take him home and introduce him to your family”). We should point out that Maluma cut off his famous cabellera for a good cause.

They seem to be aware of everything that the other does on social media, like good BFFs.

Credit: maluma / Instagram

The perfect frenemiesIn this photo, which has nearly a million likes, Maluma teases J Balvin: “Someone tell him who is the real daddy”. We can guess that Maluma didn’t really like that comment about his lost mane, eh?

We love to witness the beginning of a beautiful friendship.

Credit: jbalvin / Instagram

They are both young men (J Balvin, the oldest, just turned 34 this month), so they will likely remain friends for years and years to come. Music careers, particularly in genres like reggaeton, which depends as much on talent as it does on youth, tend to be short. We can just imagine what they will look like as a pair of viejitos watching videos of their best years and, hopefully, smiling over their many collaborations. Se vale soñar.

READ: 21 Things You Didn’t Know About Reggaeton Star J Balvin

Stevey Harvey Made a Tacky Joke About Miss Colombia and the Internet Isn’t Having It

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Stevey Harvey Made a Tacky Joke About Miss Colombia and the Internet Isn’t Having It

Dailymail / Twitter

After the 2015 Miss Universe disaster where Steve Harvey erroneously crowned Miss Colombia? who? the winner of the pageant when Miss Philippines Pia Wurtzbach was actually the winner, we assumed that Harvey would try to be on his best behavior from now on. But of course, Steve Harvey being Steve Harvey, he couldn’t play it straight for too long. And, once again, he’s embroiled himself in another controversy–again, involving Miss Colombia.

From the get-go, Harvey started off his hosting gig awkwardly, immediately addressing his 2015 headline-making mix-up. He then proceeded to make an off-color joke about the fiasco. “Colombia’s gotten over that. They’ve forgiven me,” he quipped. “Well, not all of them. The cartel’s still tripping a little bit”. 

As if this opening joke weren’t offensive enough, Harvey continued to rag on Colombia when announcing that Miss Colombia Gabriela Tafur had qualified for the Top 20. 

After being announced, Tafur approached Steve Harvey, joking with him a little about his his famous absentmindedness. “Yes, I’m here,” she joked. “Are you sure you read correctly? Should I go back?”.

Harvey admitted to Tafur that he was “struggling” with his hosting duties, to which Tafur replied, “You’re forgiven”. Sensing an opportunity to shoe-horn in another narco joke, Harvey said: “You’ve forgiven me, not the cartel…They’re not handling it the same way.”

Tafur, although she looked as if she were trying to be a good sport and smile it off, appeared to become a bit more frozen after he cracked the joke. It also should be noted that the audience didn’t seem to respond well to the joke–there was little laughter to be heard coming from the crowd.

The backlash to Harvey’s joke was swift, with Colombians accusing the comedian of perpetuating negative stereotypes about  their beloved South American country.

The truth is, pageantry is an important aspect of many Latino cultures–especially ones in South America. Part of the reason that many of these women join pageants is to be a positive representation of their country for the rest of the world. 

There is even a “National Costume Show” portion of the competition where contestants dress up in outfits that illustrate an authentic aspect of the culture of their home country. No country is perfect and the pageant isn’t meant shouldn’t be turned into a platform to single out a country and bring attention to its flaws.

Miss Colombia, for her part, took to Twitter herself to drag Harvey for his offensive joke. 

Although many people still associate Colombia drugs, gangs, and violence, its murder rate has fallen to 25% in the last 25 years. In 2016, the Colombian government and the guerrilla Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia signed a peace treaty with the goal of putting an end to a violent civil war that has last 52 years. The treaty included switch illegal crops like coca with alternatives, hopefully minimizing opportunity for drug traffickers. Since then, Colombia’s homicide rate has dropped to an all-time low

Not only was the audience unimpressed with Harvey’s inappropriate joke, but Twitter was too.

It’s one thing to slip up once, make an inappropriate joke, and then stop after you’ve learned the error of your ways. Harvey continued to make Colombia the butt of his jokes and he crossed the line. 

This person made a point to call out Steve Harvey for trying to embarrass Colombia on a worldwide stage. 

Miss Colombia is chosen to be a representative about the best parts of her country. Tafur has nothing to do with cartels. 

This person explained how Harvey’s “joke” was disrespectful to actual victims and survivors of cartel violence.

Believe it or not, cartel violence is an epidemic in Colombia. We guarantee that if Harvey experience the violence in person, he wouldn’t be making light of the situation on international TV.

In an event as globally inclusive as Miss Universe, it’s imperative to recognize that no country is perfect.

Colombians are tired of being thought of as narcos and drug addicts in the eyes of the world. 

This Twitter user was full of kind words for a woman who handled an uncomfortable situation with such grace

I like how @IAmSteveHarvey makes a joke about the cartel to #MissColombia and then cut to her package and she’s like “I’m a lawyer and have been fighting violence in my country.” Get it girl. And Steve, sit down man. #MissUniverse

Head Of Brazil’s National Arts Foundation Says Rock Music Causes Abortions

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Head Of Brazil’s National Arts Foundation Says Rock Music Causes Abortions

IMDB

One of President Jair Bolsonaro’s top officials, the head of Brazil’s National Arts Foundation Dante Mantovani says rock music leads to satanism and abortions. The right-wing conspiracy posits that the social theorist Theodore Adorno, who was influenced by Karl Marx, wrote the entire Beatles’ song catalog to destroy Western civilization. It is completely unfounded and totally fabricated.

Mantovani shared a video on his personal YouTube page explaining how rock music leads to abortions which leads to Satanism. The 11-minute video accuses Elvis Presley and John Lennon of being affiliated with the devil. 

Mantovani says rock music destroyed American values in the 1960s.

“Rock music leads to drugs, which leads to sex, which leads to abortions,” Mantovani said. “At the same time, the abortion industry feeds into something much more serious which is Satanism.” 

On December 2nd, Bolsanaro appointed Mantovani to oversee Funarte, an organization founded in 1975. Once under the Ministry of Culture, after Bolsonaro’s administration eliminated that agency, it is now under the subdivision of the Ministry of Citizenship according to CNN. The purpose of Funarte is to, “promote and incentivize the production, practice, development and diffusion of the arts throughout the country.”

Mantovani lambasted artists like John Lennon and Elvis Presley for introducing behaviors like “hip-shaking” that leads to satanism.  “Lennon openly said, more than once, that he made a pact with the devil — with Satan, in order to be famous and successful,” he says. “In the 1950’s this so-called Elvis Presley emerges with rock music that makes everyone bounce and shake their hips. This is when certain behaviors start being introduced — Elvis Presley, for instance, died of an overdose.”

This isn’t the first time Mantovani has disparaged rock music.

Mantovani seems to believe that there is too much rhythm in rock music which causes people to beat each other. 

“What happens with rock is that the rhythm is always very repetitive. When a musical genre is more based on rhythm it speaks more to the body than the soul,” Mantovani says in a video from 2018 named “Is Rock Music?” “That’s why you see in rock shows people jumping, sometimes hitting each other — in punk rock there is the tradition of people beating each other and then leaving as old friends.” 

The issue with Mantovani’s bizarre views is that they could influence polices. He will oversee initiatives for music events and he is responsible for allocating government funds to music and the arts. In the past, artists have been able to receive up to 60 million Brazilian reals ($14 million) in funding from the government, although Bolsonaro has recently slashed that number. 

The government official also blames the American CIA for spreading the psychedelic drug LSD at Woodstock 1969. 

“Woodstock, that festival from the 1960s that gather a bunch of people, where hippies took drugs and LSD — there are certain theories that suggest that the large scale distribution of the drug was actually carried out by the CIA,” he says in the video. 

Of course, Mantovani is willing to make exceptions for his personal favorites: Metallica and Angra. 

Mantovani claims Metallica and Angra are the exceptions to the rule because they’re good to listen to “when you’re driving in traffic” or “feeling a bit tired.” Angra bassist Felipe Andreoli responded on Instagram, saying he was embarrassed to even be affiliated with the head of Funarte. 

“So much ignorance, so much disinformation, SO EMBARRASSED to have my band associated in any way with this guy. I’m not going to waste my time attacking his comments because, those of us who live off of and know about rock music know that he is delirious,” CNN translated. “It scares me to see such a retrograde, fanatical person in such an important position for our country’s culture.”

Newsweek believes the conspiracy theory, that Adorno wrote the Beatles’ music with Marxist undertones, began to spread amongst the right in Brazil this September, a month before Mantovani made his video. Olavo de Carvalho a mentor of Bolsonaro and a right-wing extremist who once said Pepsi used stem cells from aborted fetuses as sweetener, spread the Beatles conspiracy. However, the conspiracy itself is fairly old.

“The theory seems to have originated with The Committee of 300, a book by supposed ex-MI6 agent John Coleman,” according to Rock Nerd. “This reveals how Adorno, in fact, masterminded the whole British Invasion of the 1960s, although apparently for that the Tavistock Institute (which Adorno had nothing to do with outside the works of conspiracists) was the work of Jesuits rather than Jews. Or perhaps, if you ask Henry Makow, the Illuminati.” 

Newsweek suggests it is unsurprising Mantovani would espouse such strange rhetoric when many in Bolsonaro’s administration seem to be obsessed with rigid, so-called traditional values.