Entertainment

Maluma, Daddy Yankee And J Balvin Slam The Latin Recording Academy For Lack of Representation at 2019 Latin Grammys

The Latin Grammy award nominees are in, and reggaetoneros are not happy. 

The Latin Recording Academy revealed the nominees for their 2019 award show. The lack of reggaeton and urban artists nominated in the show’s main categories such as; Song of the Year, Album of the Year and Record of the Year, stirred controversy. 

Some of the biggest Latin artists of the likes of J Balvin, Daddy Yankee and Maluma, have publicly spoken out. They’ve taken to social media to call out the Latin Grammy Awards for excluding reggaeton and trap musicians from top categories and for a lack of representation. 

The omission of artists like Maluma, Ozuna, Bad Bunny, Daddy Yankee or Nicky jam is surprising to say the least.

Credit: Maluma / Instagram

Maluma was one of the first to take to Instagram to express his discomfort after not receiving any nominations for his album 11:11:

“A huge disappointment to not even get one nomination to a Latin Grammy, so much effort, the best album of my LIFE”, “I’m definitely confused and don’t know what to think. The only thing that’s clear is that the biggest prize of all is to see concerts packed and an audience that loves you and identifies with you. I love you people, but I can’t hide this fucking feeling that hurts inside”.

Other reggaetoneros took to social media with a unified message: “Sin Reggaetón no hay Latin Grammy”, ‘without Reggaeton there’s no Latin Grammys’.

Credit: nickyjampr / Instagram

Daddy Yankee who did receive a nomination for Best Urban Fusion/Performance for “Con Calma”, also expressed his disapproval of the way the genre was treated:

“Despite being nominated, I don’t agree with the way the genre and many of my colleagues were treated.” he wrote in Spanish, “Remember one very important thing, your platform wasn’t what created this movement; this goes beyond a prize, this is culture, credibility, relevance, and RESPECT. #sinreggaetonnohaylatingrammy”.

J Balvin, who racked up eight nominations last year and was the most nominated artist at the 2018 Latin Grammys, posted the photo of the crossed out Grammy logo too. He captioned the image “For the culture and the movement,” Nicky Jam, Karol G, and other artists posted the image to Instagram too.

J Balvin also took to his Instagram to explain why many artists were so upset about the nominations.

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Frente a los Latin Grammy

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Balvin was a double nominee this year, with nominations for Best Urban Song with songs “Con Altura”, a collaboration with Rosalía, and “Caliente” with De La Ghetto, but was shut out of Record of the Year. His album with Bad Bunny “Oasis”, was not eligible for the 2019 Latin Grammys but will qualify in 2020. He followed up his initial “Without Reggaeton there’s no Grammys” post with a video to explain what the hashtag was all about:

In a statement to The Associated Press, the Latin Recording Academy said that they have “followed a strict voting process for the past twenty years” when it comes to considering nominees. 

“The members, through their votes, select what they believe merits a nomination. The Academy has never influenced their decisions, have always honored, and respected their elections, even if there are people who do not agree with the results,” the statement continued. “Nevertheless, we hear the frustration and discontent. We invite the leaders of the urban community to get involved with the Academy, to get involved with the process, and to get involved with discussions that improve the Academy.”

Nicky Jam y and Karol G, who earned last year’s award for best new artist, earned zero nominations on this occasion while other artists like Bad Bunny and Ozuna were restricted to categories such as Best Urban Song, Best Urban Music Album and Best Urban Fusion/Performance. 

The Latin Grammys controversy isn’t too different to hip-hop’s longstanding issues at the Grammys, where rap and R&B stars rarely win in the top four categories, such as ‘Best Artist’.

The Latin Grammy Awards are set to take place on November 14 in Las Vegas. Rosalía is nominated for five awards, including Album of the Year for El Mal Querer, and Camila Cabello‘s Spanish-language Alejandro Sanz collab, “Mi Persona Favorita,” is up for Record of the Year, Song of the Year, and Best Pop Song.

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Maluma Lands Cover Of “Elle” And Talks About Why It’s So Hard To Make New Friends

Entertainment

Maluma Lands Cover Of “Elle” And Talks About Why It’s So Hard To Make New Friends

Jeff Kravitz/MTV VMAs 2020/Getty Images for MTV

It seems like Maluma has long gotten the short end of the stick. As J Balvin and Bad Bunny rocketed to international superstardom, Colombian pop star Maluma hasn’t quite enjoyed the same level of mainstream recognition that they have. I mean who can forget his snub at the 2019 Met Gala…that was just heartbreaking to watch.

Although he’s just landed the cover of Elle magazine (the first time it’s ever featured a man), many are still asking why a pop star as talented and gorgeous as Maluma hasn’t reached the same level of fame? Well, in his interview with Elle, we get a few answers to some of world’s most pressing questions for Maluma.

Maluma has become the first ever man on the cover of Elle magazine.

Colombia’s superstar reggaetonero landed the cover of Elle’s February 2021 issue, becoming the first man to ever achieve the honor – and he shared a lot about his life – from his music, his 2020 experiences and his friendship with Jennifer Lopez.

And Maluma himself also seemed excited about the cover. “IT’S MALUMA BABY!!!!! Thank u @elleusa for making me the first male on the cover of the magazine, this means a lottttt to me!” he wrote on social media alongside the cover photo, which features the global superstar rocking green hair.  

“Let’s keep dreaming and achieving,” he added. 

Although the Colombian singer-songwriter’s world tour was suspended last year due to the coronavirus pandemic, Maluma’s popularity has continued to skyrocket. (He even dropped a collab with The Weeknd last fall.)

In the interview, he reflected on 2020 and how it’s impacted him and his career.

Credit: MICAIAH CARTER / Elle

“2020 has been a very difficult year for all of us, but I feel like this was my best year so far, musically, artistically, and personally,” Maluma told Elle, and he couldn’t be more right.

“I was talking the other day with my parents, and they were very happy because I’ve stayed a long time in Colombia, but they were also a little bit worried because they didn’t know what was going to happen with my work,” he continued, reflecting on the time he’s spent at home amid the pandemic. “My job is being on tour, but for me this has been very positive, being here in Colombia. I feel very connected again with myself.”

The singer also opened up about building connections with others, especially in the music industry.

“I don’t really like having new friends,” he said. “I try to make friends in the industry, but it is very hard. Sometimes I feel like they want to be my friends, but once I show them my back, they stab me.” 

“I prefer staying safe with my friends, where I always feel comfortable. When I didn’t have any money, they were there for me, inviting me to their house for lunch. They’re the ones who were laughing at me, and now they are enjoying my success,” he continued. “That’s life—just being grateful for everything that has happened.”

Though he didn’t name names, many were quick to speculate about who Maluma may be referring to.

While Maluma didn’t explicitly name anyone in the industry, Anuel AA appeared to diss him in Bryant Myers’ “Gang-Ga” remix in 2019. In the song, Anuel rapped, “Nunca flow Maluma / Siempre real G,” in which Anuel essentially meant he had a “real flow.”

The Puerto Rican artist added more fuel to the fire by writing on Instagram, “Flow Maluma = Pa las baby.” Around that time, Bad Bunny also tweeted Anuel’s verse.

Maluma later addressed the lyrics during an interview with Molusco, saying, “No me importa, la verdad. No me importa,” which translates to “I don’t care, in all honesty. I don’t care.” He joked for Anuel and Bad Bunny to call him, adding, “I don’t know why they did it. I’m still confused.”

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Music’s Biggest Night Is Officially Postponed As COVID-19 Wreaks Havoc On California

Entertainment

Music’s Biggest Night Is Officially Postponed As COVID-19 Wreaks Havoc On California

Kevin Winter / Getty

The 2021 Grammys won’t be taking place as expected at the end of the month. According to Rolling Stone, the Grammys have been postponed indefinitely thanks to the extreme surge of COVID-19 cases in the Los Angeles area – which is where the Grammys take place year after year.

The shocking surge in cases of COVID-19 have forced the Grammys to postpone the award show.

It was announced just this week that Los Angeles County – which is currently experiencing one the worst outbreaks in the world – is seeing someone die of COVID-19 every 15 minutes. Meanwhile, a reported 7,600 people in LA are hospitalized with COVID symptoms.

As many Angelenos – and Americans across the country – remain under strict stay-at-home orders, it would definitely not seem right to move forward with a glitzy award show that would risk making the outbreak worse.

As a result, the Grammys are planning a limited production event to take place in March, according to The Fader. In other words, no live audience and only performers and presenters on-site. Nominees and winners would likely accept their awards remotely like many of last year’s award ceremonies during the first wave of the pandemic.

This year’s Grammys were expected to feature big moments for the Latin music industry.

Bad Bunny was expected to pick up awards and was rumored as a performer. Other Latino nominees included J Balvin, Camilo, Arca and Lido Pimienta. Meanwhile, Selena was also scheduled to receive a posthumous Lifetime Achievement Award that her family was planning to accept on her behalf.

Original Story Posted November 10, 2020:

Seriously, it was just last year that some of the world’s most popular artists – reggaetoneros and trap artists like Bad Bunny and J Balvin – were completely ignored. I mean it was so serious there was even a hashtag: “Sin Reggaetón, No Hay Grammy.”

At the 2019 Latin Grammy Awards, the top award categories very conspicuously left out these very artists. However, this year they’re dominating all the categories and bringing in a record number of nominations.

The 2020 Latin Grammy nominations are in and they definitely do a better job at representing the community than last year’s.

In 2019, the Latin Grammy’s went viral but really for all the wrong reasons. social media exploded as Latin artists posted images of the Grammy logo with a large red “X″ across it, with words on the image reading in Spanish: “Without reggaeton, there’s no Latin Grammys.” Balvin even skipped the live show and Bad Bunny, who won best urban music album during the telecast, told the audience: “With all due respect, reggaeton is part of the Latin culture.”

This definitely forced the Grammy’s to reconsider this year’s awards.

“Over the last year, we continued engaging in discussions with our members to improve the awards process and actively encouraged diverse Latin music creators to join and participate,” Latin Academy President and CEO Gabriel Abaroa Jr. said in a statement, calling this year’s nominees “a group that reflects the constant evolution of Latin music.”

To honor Latin rap and reggaeton performers, the Latin Grammys added new categories this year, including best reggaeton performance and best rap/hip-hop song.

J Balvin leads the pack with an astonishing 13 Grammy nominations.

In announcing this year’s nominees, J Balvin is in the lead with 13 total nods, including two nominations Album of the year, thanks to his own album Colores and his collab with Bad Bunny, OASIS.

The Colombian reggaetonero has a chance to win his first album of the year prize — a category with 10 contenders – and his chances look pretty good. However, even if he doesn’t pick up that, he’s in the running for several other awards.

Bad Bunny is close behind with nine nominations for what was a record-breaking year for the artist.

Bad Bunny is included in the Album of the Year category for his album YHLQMDLG (which was this year’s best-selling Latin album), however, his surprise album, LAS QUE NO IBAN A SALIR, wasn’t recognized in any category.

In the Best Urban album category, Bad Bunny’s YHLQMDLG is up against Anuel AA’s Emmanuel, Benito’s Oasis with J Balvin, Balvin’s Colores, Feid’s Ferxxo: Vol. 1 M.O.R., Ozuna’s Nibiru, Sech’s 1 of 1, and rising Puerto Rican rapper Myke Towers’Easy Money Baby.

Meanwhile, the Album of the Year category could get pretty interesting with this caliber of nominees.

This year’s Album of the Year category prove what an incredible year 2020 was for Latin music. We were blessed with hit after hit which was all the more important considering what a traumatic year it’s been.

Bad Bunny and J Balvin are both competing for the award. San Benito’s YHLQMDLG faces off against Balvin’s Colores and their joint album OASIS. Meanwhile, albums from Camilo (Por Primera Vez), Ricky Martin (PAUSA EP), and Kany García (Mesa Para Dos), are all up for the same award. What’s extra special about this category this year is that it’s also featuring three nominees from the LGBTQ community.

This year’s top-selling record, “Tusa”, is also up for a Grammy.

Colombian reggaetonera Karol G along with Trinidadian rapper Nicki Minaj are nominated for this hit song that has just blown up the airwaves this entire year.

“Tusa” is the sole Latin trap nominee in the song of the year category, where 11 tracks are in contention. It’s a departure for Karol G, who didn’t receive a single nomination last year and was part of the group of uber-successful Latin trap and reggaeton artists who were dissed in top categories like album, song and record of the year. This year, the Colombian performer who was named best new artist in 2018 has four nominations, including two shared with Minaj.

It’s encouraging to see the academy actually reflect what is happening in Latin music. The inclusion of this larger variety of artists helps illustrate just how diverse the Latin music industry really is. But to see who actually takes home the awards will be a different story. The Latin Grammy Awards will air live from Miami on Nov. 19 on Univision.

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