Entertainment

Here’s How Lizzo Took A Coward’s Voicemail Breakup And Turned It Into A Number One Song

Not long before Lizzo took a DNA test that revealed she was in fact, 100 percent that b*tch, sis left her heartbroken like the rest of us mortals. Turns out that shitty ex-boyfriends happen even to the best of us. 

In case you missed it, Lizzo got personal with Billboard and revealed that the song actually came from a bad breakup. The singer-rapper-flutist disclosed that “Truth Hurts” —an anthem against good-for-nothing mencame from heartbreak and tears; “That’s how hit records are made. They’re made from the heart. They’re made from tears. They’re made from fears. And they’re made from happy endings.”

Lizzo went into the studio after receiving an upsetting voicemail and didn’t even want to be there.

The singer told Billboard that when she went into the studio to record, two years ago, she had just been dumped…over the phone, and didn’t even want to be there. “I was so upset and depressed and sad,” she remembers. The singer went on to retell how she had just received a voicemail from a guy telling her not to call him anymore because he was getting back together with his ex. Gives more meaning to the words “Don’t text me, tell it straight to my face,” right?

As Lizzo was telling producer Ricky Reed all about the Minnesota Vikings player in her DMs and having to wash her ex out of her hair, she noticed as she was talking, that Reed was writing. When she asked what he was doing, he replied, “I hope you know you just wrote a song.” Everything fell into place from there.

She kept coming up with lyrics about the person who hurt her, “I don’t know what type of magical honey was in my throat when I woke up that morning, but shit!”

Credit: lizzobeeating / Instagram

She admits she “hated” the beat at the beginning, which was a sample from an artist named Tele. But once Reed added drums, Lizzo quickly changed her mind. The lyrics began to flow, “I literally kind of went in the booth and laid down everything, verbatim, that I had said about this person who had hurt me,” she said. Lizzo even compared it to playing tag, saying that she kept coming up with lyrics that she had to run back and forth into the booth to record. “I was like, ‘fuck, everything that’s coming out of my mouth is the song today. I don’t know what type of magical honey was in my throat when I woke up that morning, but shit!’”

Good thing she went into the studio that day, because what started out as a shitty day, quickly turned into a life-changing moment. “We put the hoe out two years ago, and it did good, a lot of people liked it,” she said. “… But two years later, they put that shit in a Netflix movie [Something Great]. Now the whole world found it. It’s a hit record, baby.” 

The song became one of the best summer songs of 2019 after being included in the Netflix film “Someone Great.”

The Hot 100 No. 1 song mixes big diva vocals with relatable stream-of-consciousness lyrics about womanhood, self-worth, and even the mundane. After the song’s initial release in September 2017, it’s had a massive revival to become one of the best summer songs of summer 2019 after being included in the Netflix film “Someone Great in a memorable scene featuring stars Gina Rodriguez and DeWanda Wise.

“I think Lizzo, and especially with all the new stuff that’s coming out, is so much about self-love and empowerment and being a woman and being comfortable in your own skin and being comfortable being the baddest bitch you can be,” said “Something Great” writer-director, Jennifer Robinson, to Thrillist about the song inclusion in the film. “All three of these women are on different journeys, and they are each their own bad bitch.”

After Lizzo’s VMA performance, “Truth Hurts” rose to No. 1 the Hot 100.

Truth Hurts, debuted at #50 on the Billboard Hot 100 the week of May 18, 2019, which was Lizzo’s first chart-topper. It later peaked at #26. Then quietly climbed over the next four months. The week before Labor Day, “Truth Hurts” had reached an apparent ceiling of No. 3, already far better than anyone could have expected.

On August 26, Lizzo performed a medley of “Truth Hurts” and “Good as Hell” at the MTV Video Music Awards which was arguably the highlight of the night. Surrounded by ass-baring backup dancers and a giant digital butt that celebrated women’s curves, and reinforced Lizzo’s comedic persona, the performance helped boost her in streams. The week after the VMAs, “Truth Hurts” saw an increase of 102 percent in digital sales, making it rise to number one on the Hot 100 that week. 

With “Truth Hurts,” the Detroit-born, Minneapolis-based, and classically trained artist created an ode to self-love after the tough end of a relationship. Women everywhere have felt the effects of screaming “You coulda had a bad bitch, non-committal” on a night out. The meaning behind the song is that heartbreak really doesn’t matter because you are “100 percent that b*tch” who puts “the ‘sing’ in single.”

READ: Lil Papi Of ‘Pose’ Is Breaking Hearts And Changing Relationship Standards Every Episode

Mariah Gives A Little More ‘Perreito’ This Quarantine

Entertainment

Mariah Gives A Little More ‘Perreito’ This Quarantine

The voice behind “Perreito,” Mariah Angeliq, gives an inside scoop on what she has coming up in her next projects and what she’s doing at home during the quarantine.

Mariah Angelique Pérez, known in the music industry as Mariah Angeliq, is a US-based reggaeton and trap artist that has hustled to quickly place herself at the top of the urban music genre.

The 20-year-old artist already has one hit single under her belt, “Perreito,” which has made everyone rush to the dance floor. Latido music interviewed the artist, who was born in Miami, to talk about what she’s up to during quarantine. She also shared another secret that you’re about to find out. 😉

Q: Mariah, you’re only 20 years old yet you have a huge career in the industry…How did this happen?

A: When you’re really young, sometimes people don’t pay much attention to you. The music industry is complicated, nonetheless, I let my music speak for itself.

Q: You ran away from home and your musical career began, what was that experience like?

A: Haha, it was hard but I had to do it. My mom was very overprotective with me and she didn’t let me do what I wanted, but I knew I had the talent to make it, to grow in music if that’s what I decided to do. When I took that risk was when I met Nelly, El Arma Secreta, and that’s when I realized that you have to risk it all to be who you really want to be.

Q: How did you become so close to El Arma Secreta?

A: I met Nelly in the studio, back when I only sang in English. He saw something in me that he liked, so we started working together and Nelly said something like, “we have to have her sing in Spanish!” and that was that.

Q: How have you been dealing with the quarantine and everything surrounding COVID-19?

A: I always try to look on the bright side of things. I’ve written a lot of songs during quarantine, I’ve been concentrating on myself, my career, and the good that can come from this moment.

Q: Has the quarantine affected any plans?

A: Yes, I think for all artists. 2020 is the year when I was most active in concerts and events and well, everything seems to be on pause for the moment. To give you some perspective, I opened up Premio Lo Nuestro and that was a huge step in my career and as soon as this is over I’ll be back for more.

Q: You’ve had a few releases these last few months, can we expect more music from Mariah as an antivirus?

A: Yes, I’ve had a few releases, canciones cabronas. Not too long ago I released “Y Que Paso?” beside Brray and the track goes hard and as for quarantine, you’re going to see a lot more. I have a whole lineup of songs for you to enjoy at home right now, even some big collaborations with Ñengo Flow and Lyanno, están cabronas.

Chosen by Pandora as one of their “Latino Artists to Follow in 2020,” Mariah Angeliq has managed to be seen in the urban music scene as a promising artist in the genre, and as she mentioned, there’s even more to come this quarantine.

Nothing left to do now but prepare ourselves and enjoy a little “Perreito” during quarantine.

Click here to learn more about Mariah. 

The Music Industry Has Stepped Up As The Pandemic’s Most Generous Donor

Entertainment

The Music Industry Has Stepped Up As The Pandemic’s Most Generous Donor

The music industry has been among the most affected by COVID-19, but, as businessman Stephen Brooks says, it has responded with great “generosity.”

Even though the growth in revenue in the music industry doesn’t compare with that of audiovisual productions or video games, it has been the industry that has demonstrated the most altruism during the global COVID-19 crisis.

“Everyone from the artists to the businesses have been hit hard by the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic,” Stephen Brooks, creator of the online music channel Latido Music, told Efe.

Nonetheless, he affirms that “they have demonstrated such generosity that brings honor to our art. I’ve never been more proud to belong to the global music family.”

This pride is due to the response of artists towards the crisis, as they were among the first entertainment figures to support the creation of funds to help the working class, provide concerts on social media, and give donations to help fight the pandemic.

Ricky Martin was among the first to come forward and, through his Instagram, has insisted to his followers the importance of staying home and donating to foundations that are helping to fight the virus.

The virtual concert phenomenon began with Juanes and Alejandro Sanz, whose approach was then followed by Panamanian artist Sech and Jorge Drexler, from Uruguay, who hoped to bring their music to the homes of their fans. Eventually, businesses both small and large and TV channels followed their lead.

Anglo-Saxon artists have also started their own initiatives. Rihanna announced that she had donated five million dollars through her Clara Lionel Foundation, “for food banks in high-risk communities and elderly citizens in the US, as well as the purchase of tests and materials to help the sick in Haiti and Malawi.”

Streaming platforms have also opened up their wallets, donating to funds destined to help workers in the industry who, for the most part, worked for them. Spotify donated 10 million dollars and launched an initiative that would match the donations from their listeners.

The data collected from reports run by companies like Nielsen and Billboard indicate that the growth in music has remained stable in comparison to other sectors of the entertainment business, which have been struggling. “Some have even declined. There are indicators that point to a slight user decline in music platforms and on Youtube.” 

Even then, the spirit of musicians doesn’t let up and every day they keep announcing new events on social media and organizations in need of support to help fight the pandemic. 

Click here to learn more about the music industry’s generosity during the pandemic.