Entertainment

Could Lin-Manuel Miranda Save ‘One Day At A Time’? Let’s Hope So

The internet was devastated when Netflix announced that they were canceling “One Day at a Time” after three seasons. The show meant so much to so many people who saw their families reflected on screen for the first time in their lives. The anger from fans was exacerbated because the cancellation announcement came just months after it was reported that Netflix dropped $80 million to stream “Friends,” which nobody asked for. Lin-Manuel Miranda did not take the news lightly and things are hopefully changing with his charge to save the show.

Netflix recently announced that they were canceling “One Day at a Time” and fans reacted with justifiable rage.

Who here has heard of “The Ranch”? Has anyone watched any of the shows? Is “The Ranch” better known than “One Day at a Time”? Who knows. However, it is clear that Netflix will continue to give paying subscribers content that many people seem so confused about.

Enter Lin-Manuel Miranda with a ray of hope for all ODAAT fans.

Ummm…que?! Is Lin-Manuel Miranda taking his name and fame to bring ODAAT back from an eventual death at the hands of Netflix? Miranda has been a driving force in Hollywood to uplift and celebrate Latino talent and Latino projects through his music and his acting. He gave people of color a chance to tell the story of one of America’s founding fathers with “Hamilton” and it changed the way people look at musicals forever.

His announcement immediately made fans scream with excitement about the work he does.

Who remembers the day the “Brooklyn Nine-Nine” got canceled by Fox? It was a devastating time for fans of a show that was a relative hit. Well, Miranda was the champion of saving that show and people are truly leaning on him to save ODAAT. It’s almost as if he understands that diverse shows, as studies have shown, perform as well as or better than majority white cast shows. People want to see themselves represented.

Even the cast members of ODAAT are giving us hope that we can still #SaveODAAT.

Rotten Tomatoes gave the show glowing reviews and even gave the second and third seasons highly-coveted 100 percent scores. That is not something to take lightly. The show was more than a sitcom; it was a window into the American family we rarely see on television.

The topics they covered are real. Whether it is coming out as LGBTQ+ in an immigrant family or dealing with colorism within the Latino community or figuring out how to best handle your mental health issues, this show was real. Losing this kind of representation touches on several communities who are being told their stories just don’t matter as much as reruns of 90s sitcoms.

Celebrities are pushing for other networks and studios to consider giving ODAAT a new home.

Yes to all of this. We can only hope someone at Amazon, Hulu, NBC, ABC, the CW, or any network wakes up to the possibility of saving the show. There is a built-in fanbase that will follow the show wherever it goes. Not only will people watch it, a different company might do a better job of promoting the show to give it even more eyeballs.

Then we saw Miranda interacting with the creator of ODAAT Norman Lear.

Talk about a mic drop. Everyone on Twitter is getting behind the #SaveODAAT campaign and it is so beautiful to watch. Netflix clearly underestimated the reaction they would get from the show, or they knew what they were doing. Why else would they try to tell the underrepresented community the show served that their stories matter?

Actions say a lot more than words. Netflix’s action to cancel a show with wide appeal and an activated fanbase is disheartening. However, seeing Miranda and a worldwide activation on Twitter to save the show proves that we need more representation like this.

Not to mention, legend Rita Moreno is not someone you can simply cancel.

Moreno is America’s abuelita. She has given us representation for decades and her role as Lydia was so incredible and nostalgic for anyone who was raised with their abuelita in the house. She showered the Alvarez children with the same kind of unfiltered and unimpeded love we experienced from our own abuelitas. How dare you try to push her out?

She’s ready to play ball and with Miranda joining the fight it is only a matter of time till ODAAT prevails.

We’re all counting on you, Miranda. You can do this. You can save this show. This show it important and necessary for million right now. Thank you for taking up the fight.

READ: Netflix Canceled ‘One Day At A Time’ And Fans Are Livid With The Network’s Decision

Emmy Nominations Snub Latino Actors Again Despite Great Roles This Year

Entertainment

Emmy Nominations Snub Latino Actors Again Despite Great Roles This Year

Rachel Luna / Getty Images

Once again, the Emmy nominations have overlooked the Latino roles that made the years memorable. From Rita Moreno to Mj Rodriguez, there were roles the covered a lot of Latino culture, and yet there was no mention from the Emmys.

The Emmy nominations are out and it is another slap in the face to the Latino community.

Latino representation in Hollywood has been a major issue for decades. Recently, there has been more and more pressure to equalize the representation of media to better reflect society. However, the Emmys still don’t get it. Instead, the only Latino recognized by the Emmys is Alexis Bledel as a Guest Actress in a Drama for “A Handmaid’s Tale.”

However, the J.Lo/Shakira halftime show was nominated for four awards.

The halftime show made history with at least 1,300 calls to the FCC complaining of the perceived overly sexualized nature of the show. Now, the performance is nominated for outstanding variety special (live), outstanding directing for a variety special, outstanding lighting design/direction for a variety special and outstanding music direction.

Yet, in the time of “One Day at a Time,” “Vida,” “Gentefied,” and “Pose” how did this happen?

There are so many shows highlighting the evergrowing representation of the complete Latino experience. There are obviously so much more to cover and bring to light, yet with the massive successes of the Latino-led shows right now, many are disappointed in the Emmys clear lack of representation.

“But not Rita Moreno, who has been killing it on One Day at a Time for four seasons. Not Laura Gómez, whose performance in Orange Is the New Black’s excellent final season was alternatively haunting and inspiring — and as timely as it gets,” Laura Bradley wrote for the Daily Beast about Bledel being the lone Latino acting nomination. “Not Melissa Barrera or Mishel Prada of Vida, a series that pushed past stereotypical Latinx stories to discuss deeper, more nuanced issues that pervade our community before it was canceled too soon.”

It is a frustrating reminder to the Latino community that so much work still needs to be done.

Latinos today have shows that they can point to as showing their experience. We have characters and actors we cling to because of their representation. The shows are also successful. “One Day at a Time,” for example, was removed for Netflix and a global effort started to save the show. Twitter was buzzing with people across the globe trying to get Netflix to reverse course on the sudden and devastating cancelation. Fortunately, Pop TV come through and saved the beloved show to keep bring us stories from the Alvarez family.

The Latino community deserves better and we need to keep making noise.

Latinos are a diverse and growing community in the U.S. We have stories that still need to be told and we have stories that are being told. They are being told with authenticity and passion. The lack of Latino representation at the Emmys is something that we are all very aware of. It is necessary to make sure that we all have a seat at the table.

Basically, it is time for the Emmys to do better.

Latino roles are out there and thriving. It is long past time for them to get the recognition they deserve.

READ: Indya Moore Told Reporters On The Red Carpet That They Do Not Identify As Latina And Here’s Why

People Have A Lot Of Opinions About The Argentina Episode Of Netflix’s ‘Street Food: Latin America’

Culture

People Have A Lot Of Opinions About The Argentina Episode Of Netflix’s ‘Street Food: Latin America’

Manuel Velasquez / Getty Images

Netflix has a new food show out and it has everyone buzzing. “Street Food: Latin America” is bringing everyone the sabor of Latin America to their living room. However, reviews are mixed because of Argentina and the lack of Central American representation.

Netflix has a new show and it is all about Latin American street food.

Some of the best food in the world comes from Latin America. That is just a fact and it isn’t because our families and community come for Latin America. Okay, maybe just a little. The food of Latin America comes with history and stories that have shaped our childhood. For many of us, it is the only thing we have that connects us to the lands our families have left.

The show is highlighting the contributions of women to street food.

“Street Food: Latin America” focuses mainly on the women that are leading the street food cultures in different countries in Latin America. For some of them, it was a chance to bring themselves out of poverty and care for their children. For others, it was a rebellion against the male-dominated culture of cooking in Latin America.

However, some people have some strong opinions about the show and they aren’t good.

There is a lot of attention to native communities in the Latino community culturally right now. The Argentina episode where someone claims that Argentina is more European is rubbing people the wrong way right now. While the native population of Argentina is small, it is still important to highlight and honor native communities who are indigenous to the lands.

The disregard for the indigenous community is upsetting because indigenous Argentinians are fighting for their lives and land.

An A Jazeera report focused on an indigenous community in northern Argentina who were fighting to protect their land. After decades of discrimination and humiliation, members of the Wichi community fought to protect their land from the Argentinian government grabbing it in 2017. Early this year, before Covid, children of the tribe started to die at alarming rates of malnutrition.

Another pain point in the Latino community is the complete disregard of Central America.

Central America includes Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Belize, and Panama. Central America’s exclusion is not sitting right with Netflix users with Central American heritage. Like, how can five whole countries be looked over during a Netflix show about street food in Latin America?

Seems like there is a chance for Netflix to revisit Latin America for more food content.

There are so many countries in Latin America that offer delicious foods to the world. There is more to Latin America than Brazil, Mexico, Peru, Argentina, Colombia, and Bolivia.

READ: This Iconic Mexican Food Won The Twitter Battle To Be Named Latin America’s Best Street Food