Entertainment

Could Lin-Manuel Miranda Save ‘One Day At A Time’? Let’s Hope So

The internet was devastated when Netflix announced that they were canceling “One Day at a Time” after three seasons. The show meant so much to so many people who saw their families reflected on screen for the first time in their lives. The anger from fans was exacerbated because the cancellation announcement came just months after it was reported that Netflix dropped $80 million to stream “Friends,” which nobody asked for. Lin-Manuel Miranda did not take the news lightly and things are hopefully changing with his charge to save the show.

Netflix recently announced that they were canceling “One Day at a Time” and fans reacted with justifiable rage.

Who here has heard of “The Ranch”? Has anyone watched any of the shows? Is “The Ranch” better known than “One Day at a Time”? Who knows. However, it is clear that Netflix will continue to give paying subscribers content that many people seem so confused about.

Enter Lin-Manuel Miranda with a ray of hope for all ODAAT fans.

Ummm…que?! Is Lin-Manuel Miranda taking his name and fame to bring ODAAT back from an eventual death at the hands of Netflix? Miranda has been a driving force in Hollywood to uplift and celebrate Latino talent and Latino projects through his music and his acting. He gave people of color a chance to tell the story of one of America’s founding fathers with “Hamilton” and it changed the way people look at musicals forever.

His announcement immediately made fans scream with excitement about the work he does.

Who remembers the day the “Brooklyn Nine-Nine” got canceled by Fox? It was a devastating time for fans of a show that was a relative hit. Well, Miranda was the champion of saving that show and people are truly leaning on him to save ODAAT. It’s almost as if he understands that diverse shows, as studies have shown, perform as well as or better than majority white cast shows. People want to see themselves represented.

Even the cast members of ODAAT are giving us hope that we can still #SaveODAAT.

Rotten Tomatoes gave the show glowing reviews and even gave the second and third seasons highly-coveted 100 percent scores. That is not something to take lightly. The show was more than a sitcom; it was a window into the American family we rarely see on television.

The topics they covered are real. Whether it is coming out as LGBTQ+ in an immigrant family or dealing with colorism within the Latino community or figuring out how to best handle your mental health issues, this show was real. Losing this kind of representation touches on several communities who are being told their stories just don’t matter as much as reruns of 90s sitcoms.

Celebrities are pushing for other networks and studios to consider giving ODAAT a new home.

Yes to all of this. We can only hope someone at Amazon, Hulu, NBC, ABC, the CW, or any network wakes up to the possibility of saving the show. There is a built-in fanbase that will follow the show wherever it goes. Not only will people watch it, a different company might do a better job of promoting the show to give it even more eyeballs.

Then we saw Miranda interacting with the creator of ODAAT Norman Lear.

Talk about a mic drop. Everyone on Twitter is getting behind the #SaveODAAT campaign and it is so beautiful to watch. Netflix clearly underestimated the reaction they would get from the show, or they knew what they were doing. Why else would they try to tell the underrepresented community the show served that their stories matter?

Actions say a lot more than words. Netflix’s action to cancel a show with wide appeal and an activated fanbase is disheartening. However, seeing Miranda and a worldwide activation on Twitter to save the show proves that we need more representation like this.

Not to mention, legend Rita Moreno is not someone you can simply cancel.

Moreno is America’s abuelita. She has given us representation for decades and her role as Lydia was so incredible and nostalgic for anyone who was raised with their abuelita in the house. She showered the Alvarez children with the same kind of unfiltered and unimpeded love we experienced from our own abuelitas. How dare you try to push her out?

She’s ready to play ball and with Miranda joining the fight it is only a matter of time till ODAAT prevails.

We’re all counting on you, Miranda. You can do this. You can save this show. This show it important and necessary for million right now. Thank you for taking up the fight.

READ: Netflix Canceled ‘One Day At A Time’ And Fans Are Livid With The Network’s Decision

A Studio Executive Wanted Julia Roberts To Play Harriet Tubman In A Biopic

Entertainment

A Studio Executive Wanted Julia Roberts To Play Harriet Tubman In A Biopic

Focus Features

Gregory Allen Howard, the screenwriter, and producer of Harriet, a historical drama based on Harriet Tubman’s life starring Cynthia Erivo, said in 1994 when he began working on the project, a studio executive wanted Julia Roberts to take on the title role. 

The obvious issue being that Harriet Tubman is one of the most celebrated black women in American history — she almost made it on the twenty-dollar bill before Donald Trump came along — and Roberts is a white woman. The executive didn’t think anyone would notice. 

Allen recalled in a Q&A how different Hollywood was 25 years ago when he first began writing Harriet.

“I was told how one studio head said in a meeting, ‘This script is fantastic. Let’s get Julia Roberts to play Harriet Tubman,’” Howard explained. “When someone pointed out that Roberts couldn’t be Harriet, the executive responded, ‘It was so long ago. No one is going to know the difference.’”

Howard retold the story in a recent essay for the Los Angeles Times. He noted that there was a sole black person in the room when the incident happened.

“Fortunately, there was a single black person in that studio meeting 25 years ago who told him that Harriet Tubman was a black woman,” Howard wrote. “The president replied, ‘That was so long ago. No one will know that.’”

It’s no surprise it would take Howard 25 years to get his Harriot Tubman script told the way he wanted. The screenwriter credited the recent blockbusters starring black icons for paving the way for his film to finally get made. 

“When 12 Years a Slave became a hit and did a couple hundred million dollars worldwide, I told my agent, ‘You can’t say this kind of story won’t make money now.’ Then Black Panther really blew the doors open,” Howard said.

Tubman lived a full life despite being born into slavery. She died at 90 years old, a free woman having liberated at least 700 slaves, and as an America hero. Harriet took her last breath in 1913, thus the idea that viewers wouldn’t remember her is moot. 

Many Twitter users of color took this anecdote as an opportunity to lament about Hollywood’s constant white-washing.

Sociologist Nancy Wang Yuen shared four photos in response. One of Angelina Jolie’s portrayal of Afro-Cuban Mariane Pearl, Mike Meyers as an Indian guru, Jake Gyllenhaal as a Persian, and Johnny Depp as a Native American. All are white characters playing a different race, while opportunities and roles for people of those races remain few and far between. 

“Julie Roberts as Harriet Tubman? Rebel Wilson is writing and producing a teen K-pop movie. Meanwhile, me and my friends can’t put two nickels together to get our indy features made or seen,” another user commented. 

Some users roasted the scenario by putting images of Julia Roberts on twenty-dollar bills or claiming they could possibly play Roberts in a film despite being a person of color. 

“I just heard that Chiwetel Ejiofor only got the part in 12 Years a Slave because Julia Roberts turned it down. Damn,” another user joked. 

Jordan Crucchiola, the associate editor of Vulture, decided to look on the bright side: an incident like this should stop anyone’s imposter syndrome short. 

“If you’re chasing a Hollywood dream and feel doubtful you’ll ever make it, remember there are executives getting paid shit loads of money to suggest JULIA ROBERTS should play Harriet Tubman. A jar of cockroaches is more qualified than some of these people so DON’T GIVE UP,” Crucchiola wrote on Twitter. 

Howard documented his struggle to get Harriet made in his LA Times essay.

Howard is perhaps best known for writing the screenplay for Disney’s Remember the Titans, but Harriet was always his passion project. 

“I wanted to turn Harriet Tubman’s life, which I’d studied in college, into an action-adventure movie. The climate in Hollywood, however, was very different back then,” Howard told Focus Features.

The screenwriter suggested that Hollywood executives were unable to see stories about black people or starring black leads as profitable. 

“The number of doors slammed in my face, the number of passes, the number of unreturned phone calls, canceled meetings, abandonments, racist rejections, the number of producing partners who bailed, are too many to list,” Howard wrote. “And later I foolishly used my status as a commercial screenwriter to get meetings and then sneaked in a pitch for Harriet Tubman’s story. Bait and switch.” 

With marginalized voices breaking barriers in Hollywood, Howard was finally able to get his film made. 

“As someone who has been in this business for decades, I am enjoying the warmth of the Hollywood climate change, and the diverse stories that are bathing in that sunlight, happy that Harriet’s other journey is now finally complete,” he wrote. 

These Are Our Favorite Latinx Comedians Who Have Comedy Specials On Netflix Right Now

Entertainment

These Are Our Favorite Latinx Comedians Who Have Comedy Specials On Netflix Right Now

Riase El Show / Netflix

Spanish is a rich and exuberant language that lends itself to creative use of words. In Latin America, using words in double entendre or doble sentido is a way of expanding the communicative capacities of español. And the comedians listed here let our darkest fears and deepest desires come out bursting as laughter. 

Netflix is investing heavily on Latin American original content, particularly in Mexico, Argentina and Colombia, where the stand up industry is more developed. Through humor, Latino comedians have a knack for talking about touchy subjects in Latin America, such as the traumatic historical past (including processes of colonialism and military dictatorships), gender and sexual diversity, and machismo. However, they do this with pointy comments and provocative acts that are designed to trigger strong reactions (some of them incite strong responses by being overtly open and even a bit inappropriate). If you wanna practice your Spanish, here’s a few titles that you def need to check out. 

Mexico: Franco Escamilla, Bienvenido al Mundo

Credit: Bienvenido Al Mundo / Netflix

Contemporary Mexico is a place of many contradictions, and some would argue even highly divided. Franco Escamilla uses crass humor to talk about his parenting experiences in a moment in which issues such as gender roles, woke culture and globalization have made Mexico a confusing but fascinating place to grow up. 

Mexico: Franco Escamilla, Por la Anecdota

Credit: Por La Anecdota / Netflix

Yes, Escamilla makes the list twice due to the variety of his repertoire. In this earlier show he laughs at himself and his many social shortcomings. This act is a provocation that invites us to rethink what masculinity means today, and how ridiculous it can be when it tries to hang on to senseless tradition. 

Argentina: Fernando Sanjiao, Hombre

Credit: Hombre / Netflix

If you speak Spanish you know how different Argentinian Spanish can be. It takes words from Italian and German… and Argentinians, particularly from Buenos Aires, tend to speak in a dramatic and very expressive way. Sanjiao speaks about masculinity and fatherhood in a hilarious way, talking about anything from the mysterious disappearance of Tupperware lids to how painful tango can be. And like any Argentinian he talks about therapy. 

Colombia: Arango y Sanint, Riase el Show

Credit: Riase El Show / Netflix

These two old timers are a true institution in their native Colombia. They can be judged as using a bit too much political incorrectness as they mock Argentines, dirty old men and everyday Colombians. If you wanna share a laugh with your old man, get a couple of drinks, put this on and build some memories.

Colombia: Alejandro Riaño, Especial de Stand Up

Especial de Stand Up / Netflix

Anyone who grew up in or has visited Bogota will ROFL with Alejandro’s witty social commentary. He is a bit of an ass at times, but he does it for the sake of his provocative style. He discusses issues that define  cosmopolitan life in the Colombian city, such as the dating scene, soccer fanaticism and styles of dancing. 

Mexico: Simplemente Manu Nna

Credit: Simplemente Manu Nna / Netflix

Manu Nna is a non-binary comedian who is open about the challenges and humor associated with being an LGBTQ person in Mexico City. Many Nna draws from Mexican popular culture and references old musicians like our eternal Juanga, as well as telenovelas and the way in which they have shaped the melodramatic psyche of Mexicans for generations.

Argentina: Lucas Lauriente, Todo lo Que Sería

Credit: Todo Lo Que Seria / Netflix

One of the oldest tricks in comedy is making fun of age, particularly if it concerns your own journey into adulthood and grumpiness. Lucas makes fun of different generations, placing himself as a middle-aged man who is starting to realize that hope is perhaps dead. His rants about millennials are particularly funny in their senselessness. 

Argentina: Malena Pichot, Estupidez Compleja

Credit: Estupidez Compleja / Netflix

Pichot takes the feminist flag to raise questions about sex, abortion, inclusive language and those men who just didn’t get the memo that the 19th century was over. A lot of cringe worthy moments that will make you rethink gender dynamics.

Colombia: Liss Pereira, Reteniendo Líquidos 

Credit: Reteniendo Líquidos / Netflix

Some Colombian women are truly hilarious when it comes to explaining the crazy expectations that society places on them (Sofia Vergara, anyone?). Apparently they have to look good and do everything as traditional gender roles are shifting and they also make up an important chunk of the productive force. Liss Pereira navigates the tribulations and involuntary comedic moments that pregnancy brings, Move over Kylie Kwong, we have a new reina embarazada in da house!

Mexico: Carlos Ballarta, Furia Ñera

Credit: Furia Ñera / Netflix

The ultimate dude comedian. He created a persona based on the iconic grunge legend Kurt Cobain. Ballarta does plenty of deprecating humor both about himself and the city of Guadalajara, where he lives with his family. He is real good on stage, and uses his imposing physical presence to give a clumsy but witty vibe.