Entertainment

We Know They Are Latino, But What Are Their Latino Roots?

We all tend to know which celebrity is Latino, but do you know the different Latino roots of some of your favorite stars?

The New Cinderella Remake Tapped Camila Cabello To Play The Princess And Billy Porter To Be The Fabulous Godmother

Entertainment

The New Cinderella Remake Tapped Camila Cabello To Play The Princess And Billy Porter To Be The Fabulous Godmother

This year, two 90s classics were remastered and re-launched. The CGI version of The Lion King and the live-action of Aladdin sent movie theaters into a frenzy. And with the success they had in the box office, Disney has announced a few more classics to be retold in the coming years. With live-action remakes taking over the world, interest in all things Disney is skyrocketing. So Sony Studios is giving us a new Cinderella live-action with a modern touch that sounds fairly different from the last remake from 2015, which was firmly traditional and palatable.

Here’s what we know about the latest re-imagining of the classic fairytale set to premiere on February 5, 2021.

Sony’s 2021 Cinderella already has an all-star cast

credit Instagram @camila_cabello

Few details are known about the plot yet, but according to The Hollywood Reporter, “Sony is putting the project on the fast track for production,” so more details will likely be released soon. Unlike 2015’s Cinderella starring Lily James, this will not be a Disney production. The Hollywood Reporter noted that the remake will be produced James Corden, and that the Grammy-nominated Camilla Cabello has been cast to play the part of the rags-to-riches princess, Cinderella. The singer is also said to be heavily involved in the music for the film, she might even inject some of her son cubano into the kids’ classic, but either way, we’re in for a treat. 

“Playing Cinderella is, honestly, a dream for me,” Cabello told “Entertainment Tonight” in August. “It’s a little bit terrifying, but I’m so excited because anybody that knows me knows I’m obsessed with musicals.” “I’m really happy that we’re at a point now in a culture where ‘Aladdin’ or ‘The Little Mermaid’ … little girls can see themselves being represented,” the pop singer added. “I think that is so important, and it’s about time.” The 22-year-old (how is she only 22!) is also working on a new album, so she has a big year ahead. 

The voice behind Frozen princess Elsa, will play the evil step-mother.

Credit Instagram @Idinamenzel

Deadline reported earlier this month that Idina Menzel, is set to assume the role of Evelyn, Cinderella’s evil stepmother. Menzel voiced Elsa, the princess behind Frozen’s iconic viral song, ‘Let It Go‘. She is also a Tony and Grammy Award-winning actress who is a Broadway mainstay from shows like Rent and Wicked

Bibidi-Bobbidi-boo, we’re getting a fabulous fairy godmother!

Credit Instagram @theebillyporter

Sony’s upcoming rendition of the classic tale just got a lot more fabulous with the announcement of the new fairy godmother. Billy Porter confirmed his involvement with the film during a panel at the 20th New Yorker Festival. And if you’re anything like us, you have to agree that his theatricality both on and off-screen more than qualify him for the role. The actor shared his excitement via the New Yorker’s Instagram stories where he first broke the news. “I have a couple movies that I’m working on,” Billy said. “I’m gonna be playing the fairy godmother in the new Cinderella movie with Camila Cabello.” In September, Porter became the first openly gay black man to win the Emmy for best actor in a drama for his work on Pose. Prior to that, he earned a Tony and a Grammy for his role in Broadway’s Kinky Boots. 

The new imagining of the poor girl turned princess grew from an original idea by Carpool Karaoke’s James Corden.

Credit Instagram @thelateshow

The film is set to be a modern musical rendition of the classic, all-too-traditional fairytale. The idea for the new take on Cinderella grew from an original idea from James Corden, the late-night talk show host who has made major musical inroads thanks to his popular “Carpool Karaoke” segments. Corden is producing the project with Leo Pearlman, his partner at Fulwell 73, the production banner that has found success with documentaries such as The Class of ’92, the BAFTA-nominated Bros: After the Screaming Stops and Karaoke. The new rendition will be written and directed by Kay Cannon, who is known for her writing and producing work on the movie series Pitch Perfect and 30 Rock. Cannon got her start working on NBC’s 30 Rock, for which she earned three Emmy nominations. 

She made her directorial debut with Blockers, a female-centric losing-your-virginity comedy whose cast included Kathryn Newton and John Cena. 

All other plot details are being kept in a shoebox, but the story is described as a modern reimagining of the traditional tale of the orphaned girl with an evil stepmother, with a musical bent thrown in for good measure. Camila’s part in the movie would be her debut into film and we’re certain that it won’t be her last adventure in the silver screen. The new Cinderella film is just one of many Disney movies getting rebooted, and we can’t wait to see what this non-Disneyfied version has in store.

 

Becky G Gets Called Out For Cultural Appropriation And Latinx Twitter Users Have Thoughts

Entertainment

Becky G Gets Called Out For Cultural Appropriation And Latinx Twitter Users Have Thoughts

The hashtag #HowDoMexicansTalk is trending on Twitter as social media users squabble about Becky G and J-Hope’s new song “Chicken Noodle Soup”. The trilingual song —an homage to the early 2000’s hit by DJ Webstar and Young B (who now goes by Bianca Bonnie), featuring AG aka The Voice of Harlem— sent Twitter into a frenzied debate on cultural appropriation and whether or not Becky G is putting on a ‘blaccent’.

The “Chicken Noodle Soup” remake sparked a heated conversation around cultural appropriation on Twitter, and the Latinx community had stuff to say. 

The much-anticipated collab between Becky G and K-pop singer J-Hope, resulted in a big Billboard Social 50 gain for Becky and has racked up over 50 million views in just 5 days. The 2006 hit remake even started a whole dance challenge after J-Hope shared a video of himself recreating the choreography on TikTok, millions of fans followed suit, posting their own videos with the hashtag #CNSChallenge. But the new “Chicken Noodle Soup” also sparked a heated conversation on cultural appropriation in the Latinx community online.

It’s not the first time BTS’ J-Hope is involved in a debate about appropriating other cultures.

credit instagram @bts_jhope

J-Hope himself has been the subject of criticism for cultural appropriation around one of the hairstyles he sported towards the end of the video. In most of the video of “Chicken Noodle Soup”, J-Hope rocks his natural hair with blonde highlights, but during the second half, he wears a twisted hairstyle that many believe resembled dreadlocks. It’s not the first time the BTS star finds himself involved in debates of this nature —especially given K-pop’s already fraught history with appropriating black culture. 

One twitter used called the song “anti-black” and accused Becky G of using a ‘blaccent’.

credit twitter @rudeboiluna

On this occasion however, the subject of debate and heated comments was ‘Sin Pijama’ singer Becky G. One outspoken account on black Latinx issues called the song “anti-black” and accused the Mexican-American singer of using a “Caribbean blaccent.” “La Mala” or @rudeboiluna, questioned Becky G’s Spanish accent in a tweet that went viral: “Non-black people of color cannot survive without appropriating black diaspora,” she wrote.

Other twitter users were quick to disagree with “La mala” and so, the rhetorical question ‘How do Mexicans talk’ started to trend as part of the debate, questioning whether there’s only one ‘correct’ way for Mexicans to speak Spanish. When asked, “La mala” responded: “like a Mexican. tf.”

Thousands of commenters asked “How are we supposed to sound in order to be legitimized as Mexican-American?”

The hashtag was a response to Luna’s argument that all Mexicans should sound the same given that Mexico has a population of nearly 130 million and is a multicultural nation that greatly identifies as ‘mestizo’ given that it’s composed of many ethnic groups complete with their own different languages. Another user asked “How do you think Mexicans sound? Do you think we [go] buRRito and tAcO all the time?”  Luna replied, perhaps in poor taste, perhaps just making light of her own ignorance, “yea lol.”

credit Twitter @jin_butterfly

@rudeboiluna’s account has since been suspended following the heated tweets on behalf of BTS’ loyal army and the Mexican community who defended their views. Thousands of Latinx commenters chimed into the argument, a debate that greatly asked: “How are we supposed to sound in order to be legitimized as Mexican-American?”. The fact is that no one’s ethnic identity needs to be legitimized by anyone. No one has the right to invalidate another person’s cultural identity or expressions. 

“You don’t look Latina” or “You don’t even speak Spanish, “are some remarks that second- and third-generation-born American Latinos hear way too often. 

credit Twitter @somexicans

Becky G is part of a troupe of Latinx artists who have been questioned for not “looking” Latino enough, or “sounding” Latino enough. The actor and singer, has shut down the ignorant claims many times before, most famously in an essay published on Popsugar.com: 

“You don’t look Latina” or “You don’t even speak Spanish.” These are the remarks that us second- and third-generation-born American Latinos often hear. The truth is, the lack of language knowledge does not lessen the Latin blood running through our veins or the stories our last names carry. There is no “look” to the passion Latinos carry within them. Although my Spanish is flawed and I didn’t grow up in Mexico, I take pride in my roots. My family’s history and the fact that all the traditions and morals passed down have shaped me to be who I am today is what it means to be a second-generation-born Mexican-American for me.”