entertainment

Latinos Have A Long History Of Being Nominated At The Academy Awards With Some Major Wins

Getty Images

“Roma” is obviously the talk of the town leading up to the Academy Awards ceremony, but Latino talent has made itself heard for decades. Actors, directors and cinematic craftspeople have been nominated and sometimes been declared the winners. For example, Mexican directors have won four out of the last five Best Director Oscars. Here’s a list of some of the standouts of Latino origin in Oscar’s famed history. This year “Roma” could indeed make history as the first Spanish-language film to win as Best Picture.

Here’s a brief look into the history of Latinos are the Oscars and the wins and nominations that validated our work in the industry.

Salma Hayek: nominated for “Frida”

Category: Best Actress in a Leading Role

Year: 2002

Credit: Frida / Miramax Films

Now that the can of worms concerning Harvey Weinstein is open and that we know that he bullied Salma all throughout the production of this film, we are even prouder of her. She gave us a performance for the ages despite the dire circumstances in which she had to embody Mexico’s most famous painter.

Guillermo Del Toro: nominated for “Pan’s Labyrinth” (El laberinto del fauno)

Category: Best Foreign Language Film

Year: 2006

Credit: Pan’s Labyrinth / Estudios Picasso, Wild Bunch, Tequila Gang

Del Toro first got the spotlight with this amazing fantasy film. He didn’t win, losing to the German “The Lives of Others,” but he certainly made an impact.

 

Adriana Barraza: nominated for “Babel”

Category: Best Actress in a Supporting Role

Year: 2006

Credit: Babel / Paramount Pictures

The veteran telenovela actress impressed us with her portrayal of a nanny caught in the midst of a terrible twist of fate. Her character was tender, yet brave.

Benicio del Toro: win for “Traffic”

Category: Best Actor in a Supporting Role

Year: 2001

Credit: Traffic / Compulsion Inc.

We can forgive this Puerto Rican actor his fake Tijuana accent. Through his imposing figure, he could really communicate the violence and despair involved in the cartel wars, north and south of the border.

Guillermo Del Toro: win for “The Shape of Water”

Categories: Best Director and Best Picture

Year: 2018

Credit: guillermo-del-toro-shape-of-water-bts. Digital image. Variety.

His reimagining of fairy tales set in the Cold War era is an impressive feat, a lovely ode to the monsters he loves. It is a spectacular achievement in film.

Alfonso Cuarón: win for “Gravity”

Category: Best Director

Year: 2014

Credit: cuaron_gravity. Digital image. Variety

This movie is a miracle. Not even Stanley Kubrick had made us feel like we were in space. Cuarón’s mastery of cinematic space left the Academy speechless and for good reason.

Alejandro González Iñárritu: win for “Birdman”

Categories: Best Director and Best Picture

Year: 2015

Credit: birdman-alejandro-gonzc3a1lez-ic3b1c3a1rritu. Digital image. Variety.

The Mexican director had already been nominated for “Babel,” but with “Birdman” he actually had fun! And it shows. His take on the state of the movie industry won the top prizes in the 2015 ceremony and established him as a powerhouse in Hollywood.

Alejandro González Iñárritu: win for “The Revenant”

Category: Best Director

Year: 2016

Credit: therevenantinterview-932×501. Digital image. Deadline.

Oops, I did it again. Yes, the director repeated the feat with this extremely violent yet beautiful film that also gave Leonardo DiCaprio his first Oscar after tons of nominations.

Juan J. Campanella: win for “The Secret in Their Eyes” (El secreto de sus ojos)

Category: Best Foreign Language Film

Year: 2010

Credit: The Secret in Their Eyes / Tornasol Films

This is perhaps one of the best Latin American films ever made. A brainy and emotional take on the scars that the military dictatorship on Argentina left for people to deal with. Ricardo Darin is in his element, a true acting legend.

Demián Bichir: nominated for “A Better Life”

Category: Best Actor in a Leading Role

Year: 2012

Credit: A Better Life / Summit Entertainment

An important film about migration gave Bichir the opportunity to shine. He is an illegal worker who fights the system in order to be able to care for his son. Heartbreaking. Brace yourselves for a year or two in the not-so-happy ending.

Anthony Quinn: nominated for “Zorba the Greek”

Category: Best Actor in a Leading Role

Year: 1965

Credit: Zorba the Greek / Twentieth Century Fox

The Mexican actor is a true Hollywood legend and this is perhaps his most famous role. Ask your abuelito and he wi will start singing and dancing to Greek music. Believe us.

Fernanda Montenegro: nominated for “Central Station” (Central Do Brasil)

Category: Best Actress in a Leading Role

Year: 1999

Credit: Central Station / Audiovisual Development Bureau, Ministerio da Cultura, BEI Comunicações

The veteran Brazilian actress was vulnerable and heroic in her portrayal of a woman who cares for a lost child.

 

Catalina Sandino Moreno: nominated for “Maria Full of Grace”

Category: Best Actress in a Leading Role

Year: 2004

Credit: Maria Full of Grace / HBO Films

This Colombian actress came out of nowhere to gather a nomination for portraying a drug mule who also happens to be pregnant. She is wise beyond her years.

Rita Moreno: win for “West Side Story”

Category: Best Actress in a Supporting Role

Year: 1962

Credit: West Side Story / The Mirisch Corporation

What an energetic Latina goddess! If you haven’t watched this classic musical, do it a la voz de ya!

Gabriel Figueroa: nominated for “The Night of the Iguana”

Category: Best Cinematography

Year: 1965

Credit: The Night of the Iguana / MGM

The veteran Mexican cinematographer shot this John Huston movie and showed everyone why the Golden Era of Mexican cinema had produced such amazing images.

Rodrigo Prieto: nominated for “Brokeback Mountain”

Category: Best Cinematography

Year: 2005

Credit: brokeback-mountain-lg. Digital image. MovieStillsDB

Alongside Guillermo Navarro and Emmanuel Lubezki, Prieto has shown that Mexican cinematographers are a force to be reckoned with. He worked with Ang Lee to produce majestic images of the American West as the backdrop of perhaps the most celebrated mainstream queer romance of all time.

Guillermo Navarro: win for “Pan’s Labyrinth”

Category: Best Cinematography

Year: 2006

Credit: Pan’s Labyrinth / Estudios Picasso, Wild Bunch, Tequila Gang

What an amazing win for Navarro. He had been working in the Mexican film industry for quite some time, but it was his careful rendition of Guillermo Del Toros feverish imagination what got him the coveted statue.

Fernando Meirelles: nominated for “City of God”

Category: Best Director

Year: 2003

Credit: 7AN54PJB6VFS7N6R6KJULBL2RU. Digital image. Los Angeles Times.

Energetic and punchy: “City of God” injected new energy to Brazilian cinema and made Hollywood look at a forgotten national film industry. Meirelles went on to build a fruitful career in Hollywood.

Carlos Saura: nominated for “Tango”

Category: Best Foreign Language Film

Year: 1999

Credit: Tango / Adela Pictures

The most Argentinian film you can think of. Elegant costumes, dramatic plots and dance moves that will make you sweat. With this nomination, Saura established himself as the leading director of his generation.

Claudia Llosa: nominated for “The Milk of Sorrow” (La teta asustada)

Category: Best Foreign Language Film

Year: 2010

Credit: The Milk of Sorrow / Generalitat de Catalunya – Institut Català de les Indústries Culturals (ICIC)

This Peruvian movie deals with the problems and joys of being a Latin American woman. A great film about the new role of Latinas, who are mothers, carers and independent women.

Emmanuel Lubezki: win for “Gravity,” “Birdman,” and “The Revenant.”

Category: Best Cinematography

Years: 2013, 2014, 2015

Credit: Emmanuel-Lubezki-Failing-Mentorless.com_-e1457105662609. Digital image. Mentorless.

After having gone home Oscar-less five times, Lubezki took three in a row. He has worked with the best directors in the world, including Tim Burton, Terrence Malick and obviously Cuarón and González Iñárritu.


READ: ‘Roma’ Leads With Ten Oscar Nominations Including For First Time Actress Yalitza Aparicio

Share this story with all of your friends by tapping that little share button below!

Here Are Some Of The Afro-Latinos Who Continue To Impact The Music Industry

entertainment

Here Are Some Of The Afro-Latinos Who Continue To Impact The Music Industry

amaralanegraaln / princessnokia / Instagram

These stellar musicians and artists are showing the beats, language and fashion of their Afro-Latino roots through a variety of music styles. Celebrate Black History Month by getting to know these eight influential Afro-Latino musicians.

1. Oscar D’Leon

When you’re dancing salsa classics such as “Llorarás” or  “Qué bueno baila usted” with your familia at your prima’s wedding, thank salsa grand maestro Oscar D’Leon. The Venezuelan salsa singer has been singing his way to the top of the salsa charts for decades, and his mega-watt smile is also a welcomed asset to Operation Smile, of which he is an ambassador for.

2. Ozuna

One of the most popular reggaetoneros who is having a major 🔥 moment right now is Puerto Rican reggaeton and Latin trip artist, Juan Carlos Ozuna Rosado, aka Ozuna. He recently made history for the Billboard Latin Music Awards by being nominated for 23 awards, the most of any Latin artist thus far. Catch him on nominated tracks including “Taki Taki” and “Te Boté.”

3. Chocquibtown

Colombian hip-hop group Chocquibtown might be under the radar to some music enthusiasts, but the group is internationally-acclaimed and award-winning, so they’re moving like the silent g in lasagna.

The group’s name pays homage to the Colombian department of Chocó, which has many inhabitants of African descent.

4. Vakeró

https://www.instagram.com/p/Bt3K5eMFeLz/

Manuel Varet Marte, known by his stage name, Vakeró, is an urban Latin artist from the Dominican Republic. He has told Billboard he is proud to be associated with the African part of his Afro-Latino roots, saying in Spanish to call him “negro”, not “moreno.” Don’t get it twisted.

5. Ibeyi2

View this post on Instagram

💫💥

A post shared by ibeyi (@ibeyi2) on

This French, Afro-Cuban and Venezuelan duo mixes electronic beats with hip-hop, piano, a little bit of French and a side of Yoruba (a language brought to Cuba from West African slaves.) Equally stunning and talented Ibeyi2 is probably best known for being in Beyonce’s ‘Lemonade’ special on HBO. Now that is what you call #BlackGirlMagic.

6. Princess Nokia

This Afro-Puerto Rican rapper is giving rap music the royal treatment. Her brand of feminism is both on display through her lyrics AND her activism. This go-getter is both a founder of Smart Girls Club AND recently announced she would be starting her own YouTube channel to promote self care, wellness and beauty. YES, QUEEN. YYESSSS!!

7. Amara la Negra

Afro-Dominican singer Amara la Negra has been a fixture in Latino households since she was a child. First she appeared on TV on the classic show, Sábado Gigante, and now she is scoring millions of views through YouTube and was a recognizable face on Love & Hip Hop: Miami. She is using the insults people have thrown at her for not being Latina enough, or not being black enough, and showing that Afro-Latinos ARE enough. She told Rolling Stone in a recent interview, Somewhere along the way, I started to feel this energy in my body – this need to empower other women, this need to liberate people. This need to talk.” And now people are definitely listening through her music.

8. Celia Cruz

The absolute, unquestionable QUEEN of salsa is and always will be the beloved Celia Cruz. Perhaps the first Afro-Latin artist to break through the class ceiling of identity and showcase to the world what it means to be black and talented, Celia Cruz put her country of Cuba and her style of salsa on the map. Her legacy continues on to this day, with musicians still revering her as one of the greatest Latina singers OF ALL TIME.

Did we miss any of your favorite Afro-Latino musicians? Let us know in the comments!!

Paid Promoted Stories

  1. In such situations, is certainly best to hold back and see for for years and
    finally move concerning. When individual shop for a gift, one approach is to ensure that he / she will love the gift. https://cuci.today/